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Battersea ·
July
6
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Zulu Mews, SW11
Zulu Mews lies within the curve of a Battersea railway. At time of writing it was the last street alphabetically in London. It arrived as the latest street in Battersea in 2010.

It had been an access road to the back gardens of Rowena Crescent but, London housing pressure being what it is, became filled with ten modern dwellings in a gated development.

The curious name comes about because Rowena Crescent was originally called Zulu Crescent when laid out in 1880. The nearby streets had all been named after 1870s British military victories. Rowena Cresent residents of the 1880s did not take to the name for the road.

When the 2010 developet was built, and needed a name, the original Zulu monicker was given to the new street.



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JULY
1
2020

 

Keeley Street, WC2B
Keeley Street has a dual history Little Wild^ Street came into existence around 1690 - there is a deed dated 1 September 1690 which refers to a "toft, peece or parcell of ground, being parcell of the garden late belonging to Weld House in or near Weld Streete … abutting towards the south to a new streete or passage of thirty foote in breadth there made or intended to be made, to lead out of Weld Streete towards Duke Streete and the arch in Great Lincolne’s Inn Fields." (N.b. Duke Street later became Sardinia Street).

There was a matching Great Wild^ Street which it lay off of. Towards the end of its history, the Little Wild Street Baptist Church and a school were notable buildings.

As part of the Aldwych scheme, Keeley Street was built over the top of Little Wild^ Street with its eastern end adjusted to reach Kingsway. All the existing buildings in the original street were demolished, leaving only its route.
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JUNE
26
2020

 

Lisson Grove, NW1
The southern end of Lisson Grove was the location of a hamlet and open space, both called Lisson Green Lisson Green is described as a hamlet in the Domesday book.

Originally Lisson Grove was part of the medieval manor of Lilestone which stretched north to Hampstead. Lisson Green broke away as a new manor in 1236 and had its own manor house.

’Lissing Green’ becames a recreation area for Londoners. By the 1790s, the Green was a large open space stretching down to Chapel Street and the Old Marylebone Road. Beside it on Lisson Grove, the Lissing Green/Lissom Grove village was part of a network of country lanes, on the east side of Edgware Road. At the southern end of the Green was the Yorkshire Stingo inn from whence stagecoaches set off for all parts.

Earlier, in 1771, Lisson Green was bought by James Stephens and Daniel Bullock, manufacturers of white lead. They set up the White Lead Manufactory next to the Nursery Garden, with unrecorded consequences to health. But until the late 18th century the district remained essentially rural.
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JUNE
24
2020

 

Castelnau, SW13
Castelnau was called Upper Bridge Road until 1889 leading as it did to Hammersmith Bridge Castelnau began in 1843 as 20 pairs of classical villas - Castelnau Villas - which were built along the road by Major Charles Lestock Boileau. In 1691, the 10th Baron of Castelnau and St Croix had fled France for England following persecution of the Huguenots. The family settled in north Barnes. Castelnau means ’new castle’ in the Occitan language given its name to Castelnau House which Charles Lestock Boileau built.

The church of Holy Trinity was consecrated in 1868 serving the now 800 residents of the area.

After the sale of the Boileau estate, other streets were laid out. In 1928 the London County Council created the 640 house Castelnau Estate. Streets were named after deans of St Paul’s as the cathedral was formerly owner of the manor of Barnes. In 1971 these passed to ownership of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.

During the 1960s, Castelnau House was demolished being replaced by a library.

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JUNE
23
2020

 

Langthorne Street, SW6
Langthorne Street is final step in the Alphabet Streets of Fulham The ladder of tree-lined streets known as the ’Alphabet Streets’ are located between the Thames and Fulham Palace Road.

The first of the streets is Bishops Avenue which was there before the others were created. There is this no ’A’ street since Fulham Palace already existed south of Bishops Avenue. Incidentally, there is also no ’J’ street.

The streets largely contain large semi-detached period homes.

Langthorne Street was built over the orchard of Mill Shot Farm in around 1902. In 1903 the London Borough of Fulham approved the Allen and Norris partnership to build houses in some of the streets.
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JUNE
30
2015

 

Red Lion Hill, N2
The contemporary Red Lion Hill connects Oak Lane and Central Avenue. It is a lot shorter than its former length as it used to cover most of what is now King Street.

Minor roads grew up along the edge of what was Finchley Common. Bow Lane, named from its shape, existed at Fallow Corner south of East End by 1814. Farther south there was a settlement at Cuckolds Haven by 1678, linked by causeways before 1814. Red Lion Hill was named by 1821 but most of its course became King Street by 1920.

During work in 1934, ten old cottages in Red Lion Hill were set alight to enable the local fire service to give a demonstration.
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JUNE
29
2015

 

Kensal House
There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original In the triangle between the canal and Harrow Road, a new Italianate villa stood by 1835. Called Kensal House and occupied by Alfred Haines in 1841, it was unusually large for its position.

In 1911, in association with the LCC, the Paddington & Kensington Dispensary for the Prevention of Consumption established an open air school for local tuberculous children, set in the estate of Kensal House.

Kensal House had an extensive garden and the Open Air School provided an education for children who would otherwise have been barred from normal school.

The original Italianate house survived in the 21st century, containing three storeys over a basement and of brick and stucco, the main façade having seven bays, a prominent cornice, and a Corinthian porch.

A 19th century wing has been added to the east and a modern one to the west. After serving as a school, the house was occupied by the Metropolitan Railway Surplus Lands Co. by 19...
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JUNE
28
2015

 

The Flora
The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10. The Flora was built in the 19th century from polychrome brick, and Pevsner notes its "angular window heads". The building is also notable for the contrasting brickwork above the windows and the floral motifs incorporated into the design.

The pub was known as The Flora Arms from 1881. In the nineteenth century, as The Flora Hotel, the building was the location for a number of inquests into deaths in the Queen’s Park area. Thomas Robinson Dipple was the publican for many years, from at least 1904 to 1921. Sometimes described as an "Irish" pub due to the large Irish community in the area, in the twentieth century the pub has been a favourite watering hole for supporters of the local football team Queen’s Park Rangers.

In April 1893, after QPR had beaten Fulham at at Kensal Rise in the final of the West London Observer Cup, the trophy was put on show in the pub.

The pub backs onto the Grand Union Canal.
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JUNE
27
2015

 

Beethoven Street School
Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate. In the playshed of the school in September 1885, the first woodwork class in elementary schools in London was opened. The instructor was J .T Chenoweth. As the expenditure was illegal, it was disallowed and the class was temporarily suspended.

The course re-started with money provided by the City and Guilds Institute and was later taken up by the London School Board as a model for other schools.
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JUNE
25
2015

 

Redcliffe Gardens, SW10
Redcliffe Gardens began life as Walnut Tree Walk, a pathway running through nurseries and market gardens. The street, built between 1865 and 1873, is characterised by a wide street, mature trees, ample front gardens and large gault brick houses arranged as detached houses, pairs, groups of three and terraces.

Redcliffe Gardens is home to Redcliffe School’s prep school.
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JUNE
24
2015

 

Harrow Road (1920s)
Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire. On the right of the image can be seen the pre-war Harrow Road Market. Beyond the market is North Paddington School.

The market, almost opposite Benjamins furniture shop, later became a wood yard.
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JUNE
22
2015

 

Westbourne Lodge
Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London. This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests.

The house was built before the railway was built but, at the time of the weeding, ran just beside the Lodge.

During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.

Comparing the 1857 photo with the 1900 map, you can clearly see the conservatory featured on the map.
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JUNE
21
2015

 

Coppetts Road, N10
By 1754 the modern Coppetts Road ran from Crouch End north towards Colney Hatch. By 1846 it was linked by a track south of Bounds Green brook to Colney Hatch Lane. At the northern end Coppetts Road met a route running westward from Colney Hatch shortly before it forked into two tracks crossing Finchley Common, later Woodhouse Road and Summers Lane. In the late 15th and early 16th centuries many copyhold lanes apparently led to individual holdings.

South of Bounds Green Brook there was only Coppetts Farm between 1783 and 1846.


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JUNE
20
2015

 

Ridler's Tyre Yard
Ridler's Tyres was situated in a part of Blechynden Street which no longer exists It was situated next to the railway bridge in Blechynden Street. This part of the street was redeveloped.
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JUNE
17
2015

 

The Apollo
The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction. It was first listed as a pub, having been built as such in 1869. The first licencee was Mr Edward Ashley.

Until after the Second World War, the pub was a typical Victorian-stlye boozer, just like many others throughout London.

In the 1950s, All Saints Road became a centre for the local West Indian population with the pub at its heart - it was possibly the first pub in Notting Hill where black people were able to be served without hassle.

In 1964, Ringo Starr was across Lancaster Road from the Apollo (on the north east corner) in the Beatles film ’A Hard Day’s Night’. Ringo first appears on St Luke’s Road. From there he’s chased by two screaming girls down Lancaster Road to All Saints Road, where he goes into a second hand clothes shop and comes out in beatnik disguise.

When All Saints Road became part of the heart of the Notting Hill Carnival, the Apollo obtained a bit of a reputation.

After a riot ...
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JUNE
16
2015

 

Kilburn Bridge Farm
Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s. Watling Street has long been running through Kilburn. The road stretched in Roman times from Dover to Wroxeter in Shropshire. Kilburn was a stopping point on the way to Willesden’s ‘Black Madonna’ shrine, and in turn a destination in itself to take the waters at the Kilburn Wells.
Around the turn of the nineteenth century, Kilburn Bridge Farm was reported as lying to the west side of Watling Street and consisting of 40 acres. It was worth £230 a year in 1795. The modern day site of the farm is just south of the junction between Kilburn Park Road and the Edgware Road.
The earliest mention of the farm dates from 1647 when a Mrs Wheatley leased 44 acres of pasture in five closes from the Bishop of London who owned the land.
In 1742, when Richard Marsh was tenant, the farmhouse and its yards stood by the road close to the Westbourne stream, with 39 acres in six fields to the south and west. It was named after the bridge where the Edgware Road crossed the stream...
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JUNE
15
2015

 

Cornwall Crescent, W11
Cornwall Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s. Development of this area had suddenly become more attractive with the opening in 1864 of the Hammersmith and City line of the Metropolitan Railway with a station on Ladbroke Grove, and the introduction in the early 1860s of cheap workmen’s fares.

By that time the Ladbroke family had disposed of the land, either by selling the freehold or by giving 99-year peppercorn rents. The land on which Cornwall Crescent lies was in the hands mainly of two merchant-turned developers, Stephen Phillips, and the speculator and ex-Calcutta merchant Charles Blake, who had already developed successfully several other parts of the Ladbroke estate. They in their turn gave building leases to a variety of builders. The normal pattern was no doubt followed, according to which the builder had to build houses meeting certain standards; he then received a 99-year lease of the houses, which he would let out, thus recovering his costs, but he had had to pay a ground rent to the landowner. In pr...
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JUNE
14
2015

 

St Lukes Mews, W11
St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11. St Luke's Mews runs across All Saints Road from St Luke's Road to Basing Street. The western half was originally called 'Lancaster Mews' and appears as such on the 1900 map.

It has been inhabited by Marsha Hunt of 'Hair', Lemmy of Motörhead, Chet Baker, Richie Havens, Joan Armatrading of 'Love and Affection' fame, and Paula Yates.

In Hollywood W11 the mews appears in 'The Man Who Knew Too Little' - Bill Murray thwarts a mugging attempt, and 'Love Actually' - Andrew Lincoln expresses his feelings for Keira Knightley with Bob Dylan-style placards.
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JUNE
12
2015

 

The Windsor Castle
The Windsor Castle dates from the 1820s but its main incarnation was as a classic Victorian public house, seminal in 1970s musical history. It started life as the building at one end of houses on the south side of the Harrow Road, then called Ormes Green.

When rebuilt about 1850, the new building was typical of the villa development in this part of Harrow Road. It has turrets on the top reminiscent of its namesake: the real Windsor Castle.

After passing about a hundred years as a classic local pub, it burst into musical significance.

It was renowned for early gigs by the Rolling Stones and the Who.

The pub was a punk rock venue in the mid to late 1970s. Playing there, among others, were Dr Feelgood, The Jam, U2 and the Psychedelic Furs. The 101`ers with Joe Strummer - his band prior to forming the Clash - played there. The inspiration for the ‘Protex Blue’ track is said to come from the contraceptive machine in the toilets of the Windsor Castle.

After moving considerably downmarket as a strip club, it closed in 2009.
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JUNE
11
2015

 

Spotted Dog
The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green. It was located near to what later was nos. 12-18 Cirencester Street and, on Roque's 1746 map, is the last building along the Harrow Road before Kensal Green.

It stood very close to Westbourne Farm. ,The farm was occupied by the actress Sarah Siddons from April 1805 to Autumn 1817, while her brother Charles Kemble lived in a smaller house nearby for part of the time.

Later it was called the Westbourne Green Tavern and kept by Eleanor Winter, a witness to the 1802 Paddington Canal Murder.

The pub had disappeared by the 1860s.
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JUNE
10
2015

 

Codrington Mews, W11
This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove. Given their uniformity, the houses must have been built all of a piece. They all have two stories. They are built of London stock brick with pitched roofs and decorative brickwork under the eaves. They have been much altered over the years, but those on the north side originally had almost certainly a double stable or stable and coach house below, and external stairs up to a door on the first floor, where there would have been accommodation for coachmen etc. This pattern survives only on No. 6 at the far end.

The mews was probably named after Admiral Sir Edward Codrington (1770-1851), who commanded a ship at Trafalgar, led the fleet at Washington and Baltimore in the American War and commanded the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia at the battle of Navarino.
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JUNE
8
2015

 

Chepstow Villas, W11
Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history. Chepstow Villas is a pleasant leafy street that runs between Pembridge Villas and Kensington Park Road. It is intersected by Ledbury Road/Chepstow Crescent; Denbury Road/Pembridge Crescent; and Portobello Road.

Until the 1840s, the whole area was agricultural land. But in around 1840 the demand for housing began to increase and the second great surge of housebuilding began on the Ladbroke estate. The Ladbroke family, the owners of the estate, had begun to sell off parcels of land to speculators. James Weller Ladbroke retained the eastern part of what is now Chepstow Villas (numbers 1-15 odds and 2-32 evens), but the central part, up as far as Portobello Road, passed into the ownership of Robert Hall of Old Bond Street. And after James Weller Ladbroke’s death in 1847, his heir Felix Ladbroke sold the western plot to a speculating parson from Bedfordshire, the Rev. Brooke Edward Bridges, and the latter then sold it on to another developer, Thomas Pocock. So there were ...
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JUNE
6
2015

 

Bulmer Mews, W11
Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate. The entrance to this mews is to the right of the Prince Albert pub in Pembridge Road. It runs down the backs of numbers 1-7 (odds) Ladbroke Road and presumably served as stabling for these and for the pub. It was probably first built up in the late 1840s or 1850s, and its original name may have been Victoria Mews – although it is already shown as a nameless alley on the 1862-5 Ordnance Survey map. By the time of the 1881 census, it had been named or renamed Prince Albert Mews or Albert Mews, a name it retained until into the 1930s, presumably because of its proximity to the Prince Albert pub. It seems then to have been renamed Bulmer Mews by association with nearby Bulmer Place, a road which ran roughly where the service road now is for the shops on the north-west side of Notting Hill Gate (and which disappeared in the great 1950s redevelopment of Notting Hill Gate).

Bulmer Place originally had two entrances, both through archways. One was in Pembridge Road down the s...
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JUNE
5
2015

 

Blenheim Crescent, W11
Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film. Blenheim Crescent runs from Portobello Road west across Ladbroke Grove and then curls round to the south to join Clarendon Road. The section between Portobello Road and Kensington Park Road consists of shops and cafés, including at one time the Travel Bookshop that inspired the 1999 film Notting Hill; the rest of the street is residential. The odd numbers are on the south side and the evens on the north. From Ladbroke Grove west, the whole crescent is now lined with magnificent mature cherry trees.

Until the middle of the 19th century, what is now Blenheim Crescent was open country. Plans began to be developed for creating a road in the 1840s. In preparation sewers were laid at any rate at the Clarendon Road end in about 1850, and some building leases were let. But the demand for housing had collapsed and the lessees probably failed to raise the necessary finance. Nothing much further happened until the 1860s, when the last great wave of development on the Ladbroke Est...
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JUNE
4
2015

 

Elgin Mews, W11
Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill. This small L-shaped mews runs from Ladbroke Grove along the back of the gardens of the north side of Westbourne Park Road before turning sharp right to emerge between Nos. 316 and 318 Westbourne Park Road. Unusually for the Ladbroke area, both entrances to the mews are through archways under buildings.

It was built in the 1860s (it does not appear on the 1863 Ordnance Survey map, but is already inhabited by the time of the 1871 census). Both sides of the mews were lined with small two-storey buildings, described in a 1960 Ministry of Housing report (quoted in old RBKC planning papers) as stables with accommodation above. There were no fewer than 28 units.

The 19th century inhabitants were mainly connected with horses - cab drivers, horse-keepers and grooms - but with a good sprinkling of labourers and minor tradesmen: a chimney sweep, a baker, a butcher’s assistant, a house painter etc. Whole families were packed into what must have been extremely cra...
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JUNE
1
2015

 

Manette Street, W1D
Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Manette Street is a small street in the Soho area of London, linking the Charing Cross Road to Greek Street. Dating from the 1690s, and formerly named Rose Street, it is now named after the fictional character of Dr Manette in Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Buildings on the street include the Foyles Building and the Pillars of Hercules pub, and Goldbeater’s House, which still has an arm-and-hammer sign outside it, a replica of the original described by Dickens in A Tale of Two Cities.

The House of St Barnabas has a chapel and garden facing onto Manette Street, and an entrance to The Borderline nightclub is accessed from Manette Street.

The street was associated with anarchism in the 19th century, in particular in association with the Rose Street Club, known for its popularity with radicals of all nationalities.
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