The Underground Map


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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Camden Town ·
September
20
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Parkway, NW1
Parkway is one of Camden Town’s older roads - originally called ’The Crooked Lane’. Parkway, a tree-lined street, was developed from Crooked Lane in the 1820s and 1830s with three-storey houses on both sides. Until 1938, Parkway was known as Park Street.

Just after the Second World War, a Camden Town local reminisced:
“Park Street, which we now call Parkway, was full of shops instead of architects’ offices and estate agents as it is now. By eight in the morning the shop boy was busy cleaning the windows and polishing the outside brasses, sweeping and burnishing inside ready to open at nine and close twelve hours later for seven shillings and sixpence a week. Shops were graded. Fenn’s, the grocers at the corner of Delancey Street and Park Street, was a cut above the others, wrapping all purchases in brown paper, while most used newspaper.”

The street now has a mix of retail and restaurant uses with some small businesses.

»more

SEPTEMBER
7
2020

 

Gloucester Road, SW7
Gloucester Road is a main street in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Gloucester Road runs north-south between Kensington Gardens (at which point it is known as Palace Gate) and the Old Brompton Road at the south end. At its intersection with Cromwell Road is Gloucester Road underground station, close to which there are several pubs, restaurants, many hotels and St Stephen’s Church (built in 1867 and, notably, the church warden of which was the poet T. S. Eliot).

In 1612 or earlier it was called Hogs Moor or Hogmire Lane. It was a ’lane through marshy ground where hogs are kept’, a name that was still used until about 1850. and it was the site of an ultimately unsuccessful pleasure garden (and for a while a pick-your-own fruit and flower farm) in the late 18th century. At that time most of the vicinity was filled with nurseries and market gardens.

The road is now named after Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh who built a house there - Villa Maria (later Orford Lodge) - in 1805, on part of the pleasure garden...
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SEPTEMBER
6
2020

 

Argyle Road, N12
Argyle Road runs from Nether Street to Dollis Brook after which it is named Lullington Garth It follows the line of an old footpath which crossed the brook at what was called Frith Bridge.

The very short stretch of road between Nether Street and a footbridge over the railway was created in 1872 with the road beyond this bridge having been an early twentieth century construction.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
5
2020

 

Brickfield Cottages, WD6
Brickfield Cottages lie between Theobald Street and the railway Brickfield Cottages were built in 1858 by Charles Morgan, who owned the brickfield next door.

Further cottages were built in 1868 for railway workers but of interest to their further story is a parallel story of local Henry Robinson. who came into possession of some of them.

Robinson built the ’Red Road’ bridge over the railway - this linked Parkfield to Theobald Street and additional gave access for Tilehouse Farm to reach some of its fields cut off by the new line.

Robinson owned much of the land in Borehamwood and in 1871 built a parade of shops in Theobald Street almost opposite the entrance to Brickfield Cottages. The shops became known locally as ’Robinson’s Folly’ - they expected the venture to fail. But the venture didn’t and the shops remain in existence today.

Robinson gave two of the Brickfield Cottages to his daughter as part of her dowry.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
4
2020

 

Bounds Green
Bounds Green is an area in the London Borough of Haringey with a station on the Piccadilly Line Bounds Green was originally an overnight stop for travellers, being just short of the tollgate at Turnpike Lane. The name is derived from the former Bounds Green Farm near Cline Road.

Nowadays Bounds Green is a residential suburb, just north of Wood Green.

Bounds Green underground station opened in 1932 in an area previously known as Bowes Park - there is also a Bowes Park railway station.
»read full article




OCTOBER
18
2016

 

Wentworth Street (1901)
Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London. The earliest depiction of Wentworth Street appears c.1560, bounded by hedges. The area immediately east of Petticoat Lane (Middlesex Street) was built up by the 1640s with substantial houses divided by yards and gardens. The southern side of Wentworth Street had properties whereas the northern side formed the boundary of the Tenter Ground, an open space used for stretching and drying silk (there were several 'tenter grounds' in the immediate area).

The northern side east of Brick Lane formed the southern boundary of the Fossan Estate.

The street was so named after Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Cleveland who owned much land in the area in the 1630s and 1640s, although early maps call it 'Wentford Street' and 'Winford Street', probably both unintentional errors.

The entire length of Wentworth Street from Petticoat Lane to Brick Lane was strongly defined by buildings by the 1740s. By the 19th century, much of the street had fallen on hard times, ...
»more


OCTOBER
16
2016

 

Whitehall Close, WD6
Whitehall Close was named for the Whitehall Studios which formerly stood on the site. It was built in the early part of the 21st century after the final demolition of a cinema screen manufacturer which stood on the site before,
»read full article


OCTOBER
8
2016

 

St Benet Sherehog
St Benet Sherehog was a medieval parish church built before the year 1111 in Cordwainer Ward, in what was then the wool-dealing district. A shere hog is a castrated ram after its first shearing.
The church was originally dedicated to St Osyth. Sise Lane in the parish uses an abbreviated form of the saint’s name. The historian John Stow believed that the later dedication of "Benet Sherehog" was derived from a corruption of the name of Bennet Shorne, a benefactor of the church in the reign of Edward II.

The patronage of the church belonged to the monastery of St Mary Overy until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown.

Matthew Griffith chaplain to Charles I was rector from 1640 until 1642, when he was removed from the post and imprisoned after preaching a sermon entitled "A Pathetical Persuasion to Pray for Publick Peace" in St Paul’s Cathedral.

St Benet’s was one of the 86 parish churches destroyed in the Great Fire of London, and it was not selected to be rebuilt when the 1670 Act of Parliament became law. The parish was united to that of St Stephen Walbrook...
»more


OCTOBER
6
2016

 

Moss Hall Crescent, N12
Moss Hall Crescent was built on land of a house called Moss Hall. The Moss Hall estate begun to be sold piecemeal after its sale in 1833. Moss Hall Crescent arrived in the 1860s. Moss Hall was demolished in 1927.
»read full article


OCTOBER
4
2016

 

Plough Inn
The Plough at Kingsbury Green was established in 1748. One in nine houses in 18th century Kingsbury was an inn, with the Plough being one of them.

During the 19th and early 20th centuries Kingsbury, a picturesquely rural district a short distance from London, attracted many walkers and cyclists, and the Plough Inn, with its attractive gardens, was once the headquarters of thirteen cycling clubs. It was at the Plough, too, that four Frenchmen and their three performing bears used to stay.

It was rebuilt in 1932 and resited to the west, later known as the Carlton Lounge.
»read full article


OCTOBER
2
2016

 

RAF Bomber Command Memorial
The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial is a memorial commemorating the crews of RAF Bomber Command who embarked on missions during the Second World War. The controversy over the tactics employed by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War meant that an official memorial to the aircrews had been delayed for many years. Despite describing bombers as "the means of victory" in 1940, British prime minister Winston Churchill did not mention Bomber Command in his speech at the end of the war.

An appeal was made for £5.6 million to build the memorial, and funding came from donations made by the public, as well as substantial amounts from Lord Ashcroft and businessmen John Caudwell and Richard Desmond. Robin Gibb, the singer, became a key figure behind the appeal, working alongside Jim Dooley to raise funds and have the memorial built.

Liam O’Connor designed the memorial, built of Portland stone, which features a bronze 2.7 metre sculpture of seven aircrew, designed by the sculptor Philip Jackson to look as though they have just returned from a bombing mission and left their aircraft.

Alumi...
»more


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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.