Metropolitan Borough of Westminster

Administrative area in/near Belgravia, existed between 1888 and 1965

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2017

The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1900 to 1965.

By royal charter dated 29 October 1900 the borough was granted the title City of Westminster. Westminster had originally been created a city and seat of the short-lived Diocese of Westminster in 1541. The diocese was suppressed in 1550, but the area was still known as a "city", although without official sanction.

Previous to the borough’s formation it had been administered by five separate local bodies: the Vestry of St George Hanover Square, the Vestry of St Martin in the Fields, Strand District Board of Works, Westminster District Board of Works and the Vestry of Westminster St James. The Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter had not been under the control of any local authority prior to 1900.

The borough was formed from eleven civil parishes and extra-parochial places: Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter, Liberty of the Rolls, Precinct of the Savoy, St Anne Soho, St Clement Danes, St George Hanover Square, St James Piccadilly, St Martin in the Fields, St Mary-le-Strand, St Paul Covent Garden and Westminster St Margaret and St John. In 1922 these eleven were combined into a single civil parish called City of Westminster, which was conterminous with the metropolitan borough.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

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Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

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Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Marble Arch Marble Arch station was opened on 30 July 1900 by the Central London Railway.
Marble Arch Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch.
Metropolitan Borough of Westminster The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1900 to 1965.
Odeon Marble Arch The Odeon Marble Arch (known as the Regal 1928-1945) was a cinema located opposite Marble Arch monument at the top of Park Lane, with its main entrance on Edgware Road.
Somerset House, Park Lane Somerset House was an 18th-century town house on the east side of Park Lane, where it meets Oxford Street, in the Mayfair area of London. It was also known as 40 Park Lane, although a renumbering means that the site is now called 140 Park Lane.
Speakers’ Corner Speakers’ Corner is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park.
St Georges Fields St George’s Fields are a former burial ground of St George’s, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road.
Tyburn Tyburn was a village of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch and the southern end of Edgware Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Close, W2 Albion Close dates from around 1830.
Albion Mews, W2 Albion Mews is a cobbled cul-de-sac that is approached through an entrance under a building on Albion Street.
Albion Street, W2 Albion Street was laid out over the Pightle field in the late 1820s.
Clarendon Place, W2 Clarendon Place is a street in Paddington.
Connaught Close, W2 Connaught Close is a cul-de-sac off Connaught Street.
Connaught Place, W2 Connaught Place is a street near to Marble Arch.
Culross Street, W1K Culross Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Dunraven Street, W1K Dunraven Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Frederick Close, W2 Frederick Close is a street in Paddington.
Green Street, E7 Green Street is a location in London.
Green Street, W1K Green Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1K Grosvenor Square was developed by Sir Richard Grosvenor from 1721 onwards.
Hampshire House, W2 Residential block
Hyde Park Place, W2 Hyde Park Place is a street in Paddington.
Hyde Park Street, W2 Hyde Park Street is a street in Paddington.
Hyde Park, W2 Hyde Park, as well as being a park, is an address for some park-located buildings
Jones Street, W1K Jones Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Lees Place, W1K Lees Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Lovers’ Walk, W1K Lovers’ Walk is a road in the W1K postcode area
Marble Arch, W1H Marble Arch is a major road junction in the West End, surrounding the monument of the same name.
North Audley Street, W1K North Audley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
North Carriage Drive, W2 North Carriage Drive is a road in the W2 postcode area
North Row, W1K North Row is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Park Lane, W1C Park Lane is a road in the W1C postcode area
Park Lane, W1K Park Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Park Lane, W1K Park Lane is a road in the W1J postcode area
Park Street, W1K Park Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Policeman’s Walk, W2 Policeman’s Walk is a road in the W2 postcode area
Portman Street, W1K Portman Street is a road in the W1C postcode area
Red Place, W1K Red Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Reeves Mews, W1K Reeves Mews is a road in the W1K postcode area
Shepherds Place, W1K Shepherds Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Stanhope House, W2 Residential block
Stanhope Place, W2 Stanhope Place is a street in Paddington.
Upper Brook Street, W1K Upper Brook Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Upper Grosvenor Street, W1K Upper Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Woods Mews, W1K Woods Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.


Belgravia

Belgravia is an affluent area of Westminster, north of Victoria Station.

Belgravia - known as Five Fields during the Middle Ages - was developed in the early 19th century by Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster.

The area had begun to be built up after George III moved to Buckingham House (now Buckingham Palace) and constructed a row of houses on what is now Grosvenor Place. In the 1820s, Richard Grosvenor asked Thomas Cubitt to design numerous grand terraces centred on squares. Most of Belgravia was constructed over the next 30 years.

Belgravia has many grand terraces of white stucco houses, and is focused on two squares: Belgrave Square and Eaton Square.

Much of Belgravia is still owned by the Duke of Westminster’s Grosvenor Group.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Montagu House, Portman Square
TUM image id: 1510140427
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Portman Square, W1H
TUM image id: 1510141130
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Marble Arch, 2016
Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=352348
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Somerset House, Park Lane: house (right) and stables (centre) in 1912, from junction of Park Lane and Oxford Street.
Credit: British History Online
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Speaker’s Corner, April 1987 Speakers here at this corner of Hyde Park nearest of Marble Arch may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police intervene only when they receive a complaint.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Michael E. Cumpston
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Montagu House, Portman Square
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A view of Tyburn (1750)
Credit: Old and New London: Volume 5. Edward Walford (1878)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Connaught Square, 2004
Credit: Andrew Dunn,
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Portman Square, W1H
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