Pynfolds, SE16

Road in/near Bermondsey

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(51.498317 -0.059417, 51.498 -0.059) 

Pynfolds, SE16

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Bermondsey · SE16 ·
FEBRUARY
5
2021

Pynfolds is a location in London.




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

Reply

   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bermondsey The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at ’Vermundesei’, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.
Brunel Museum The Brunel Museum is a museum at the Brunel Engine House in Rotherhithe.
St. Mary’s Church, Rotherhithe St Mary’s Church, Rotherhithe, is a Church of England parish church.
The Angel The Angel Public House is grade II listed and dates from the 1830s.

NEARBY STREETS
Adams Gardens Estate, SE16 Adams Gardens Estate is a location in London.
Albion Street, SE16 Albion Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Ann Moss Way, SE16 Ann Moss Way is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Apollo Business Park, SE16 Apollo Business Park is a location in London.
Aylton Estate, SE16 Aylton Estate is a location in London.
Banyard Road, SE16 Banyard Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bermondsey Wall East, SE16 Bermondsey Wall East is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bevington Street, SE16 Bevington Street was named after Samuel Bourne Bevington, the first mayor in 1900 of the new Bermondsey Borough Council.
Canada Estate, SE16 Canada Estate is a location in London.
Cathay Street, SE16 Cathay Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Cherry Garden Street, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
City Business Centre, SE16 City Business Centre is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Clemence Road, SE16 Clemence Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Clement, SE16 Clement is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Clements Road, SE16 Clements Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Clements Rod, SE16 Clements Rod is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Clements, SE16 Clements is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Collett Road, SE16 Collett Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Collingwood House, SE16 Collingwood House is a location in London.
Cottle Lane, SE16 Cottle Lane is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Culling Road, SE16 Culling Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Dartle Court, SE16 Dartle Court is a location in London.
Dickens Estate, SE16 Dickens Estate is a location in London.
Dixon’s Alley, SE16 Dixon’s Alley is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Drummond Road, SE16 Drummond Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Elephant Lane, SE16 Elephant Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Emba Street, SE16 Emba Street is a location in London.
Farncombe Street, SE16 Farncombe Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Fountain Green Square, SE16 Fountain Green Square is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Fulford Street, SE16 Fulford Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Gataker House, SE16 Residential block
Gillison Walk, SE16 Gillison Walk is a location in London.
Globe Stairs, SE16 Globe Stairs is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Gomm Road, SE16 Gomm Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Hatteraick Road, SE16 Hatteraick Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Henley Close, SE16 Henley Close is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Jamaica Road, SE16 Jamaica Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Janeway Street, SE16 Janeway Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
John Roll Way, SE16 John Roll Way is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Keetons Road, SE16 Keetons Road is a location in London.
King Edward the Third Mews, SE16 King Edward the Third Mews is a location in London.
King Stairs Close, SE16 King Stairs Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Kirby Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Linsey Street, SE16 Linsey Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Llewellyn Street, SE16 Llewellyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Lockwood Square, SE16 Lockwood Square is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Lower Road, SE16 Lower Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Lucey Way, SE16 Lucey Way is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Marden Square, SE16 Marden Square is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Marigold Street, SE16 Marigold Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Mayflower Street, SE16 Mayflower Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Millpond Estate West Lane, SE16 Millpond Estate West Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Millpond Estate, SE16 Millpond Estate is a location in London.
Moodkee Street, SE16 Moodkee Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
National Terrace, SE16 National Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Neptune Street, SE16 Neptune Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
New Place Square, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Paradise Street, SE16 Paradise Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Perryn Road, SE16 Perryn Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Pottery Street, SE16 Pottery Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Priter Road, SE16 Priter Road is a location in London.
Prospect Street, SE16 Prospect Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Railway Avenue, SE16 Railway Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Renforth Street, SE16 Renforth Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Risdon Street, SE16 Risdon Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Rosebud Mews, SE16 Rosebud Mews is a location in London.
Rotherhithe Tunnel, SE16 Rotherhithe Tunnel is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Rotherhithe Tunnel, SE16 Rotherhithe Tunnel is a road in the E1W postcode area
Rupack Street, SE16 Rupack Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Scott Lidgett Crescent, SE16 Scott Lidgett Crescent is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Slippers Place, SE16 Slippers Place is a road in the SE16 postcode area
St Marychurch Street, SE16 St Marychurch Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
St Olav’s Square, SE16 St Olavs Square is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
St Olaves Court, SE16 St Olaves Court is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
St. James’s Road, SE16 St. James’s Road is a location in London.
St. Marychurch Street, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Stalham Street, SE16 Stalham Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Stork’s Road, SE16 This is a street in the SE16 postcode area
Thames Path, SE16 Thames Path is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Thames Tunnel Mills, SE16 Thames Tunnel Mills is a location in London.
Thurland Street, SE16 Thurland Street is a location in London.
Toussaint Walk, SE16 Toussaint Walk is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Tower Bridge Business Complex, SE16 Tower Bridge Business Complex is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Tranton Road, SE16 Tranton Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Tunnel Wharf, SE16 Tunnel Wharf is a location in London.
Waterside Close, SE16 Waterside Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Webster Road, SE16 Webster Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
West Lane, SE16 West Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Wharf, SE16 Wharf is a location in London.
William Ellis Way, SE16 William Ellis Way is a location in London.
Wilson Grove, SE16 Wilson Grove is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.


Bermondsey

The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at ’Vermundesei’, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Though Bermondsey’s name may derive from Beornmund’s island (whoever the Anglo-Saxon Beornmund was, is another matter), but Bermondsey is likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area, rather than a real island.

The area first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at Vermundesei, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Bermondsey appears in Domesday Book. It was then held by King William, though a small part was in the hands of Robert, Count of Mortain, the king’s half brother, and younger brother of Odo of Bayeux, then Earl of Kent.

Bermondsey Abbey was founded as a Cluniac priory in 1082, and was dedicated to St Saviour. Monks from the abbey began the development of the area, cultivating the land and embanking the riverside. They turned an adjacent tidal inlet at the mouth of the River Neckinger into a dock, named St Saviour’s Dock after their abbey. The Knights Templar also owned land here and gave their names to one of the most distinctive streets in London, Shad Thames (a corruption of ’St John at Thames’). Other ecclesiastical properties stood nearby at Tooley (a corruption of ’St Olave’s’) Street, located in the Archbishop of Canterbury’s manor of Southwark, where wealthy citizens and clerics had their houses, including the priors of Lewes and St Augustine’s, Canterbury, and the abbot of Battle.

As it developed over the centuries, Bermondsey underwent many changes. After the Great Fire of London, it was settled by the well-to-do and took on the character of a garden suburb especially along the lines of Grange Road, as Bermondsey Street became more urbanised. A pleasure garden was founded there in the 17th century, commemorated by the Cherry Garden Pier. Samuel Pepys visited ’Jamaica House’ at Cherry Gardens in 1664 and recorded in his diary that he had left it "singing finely".

Though not many buildings survive from this era, one notable exception is the church of St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey Street, completed in 1690 (although a church has been recorded on this site from the 13th Century). This church came through both 19th-century redevelopment and The Blitz unscathed. It is not just an unusual survivor for Bermondsey; buildings of this era are relative rarities in Inner London in general.

In the 18th century, the discovery of a spring from the river Neckinger in the area led to Bermondsey becoming a spa leisure resort, as the area between Grange and Jamaica Roads called Spa Road commemorates.

It was from the Bermondsey riverside that the painter J.M.W. Turner executed his famous painting of The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her Last Berth to be Broken Up (1839), depicting the veteran warship being towed to Rotherhithe to be scrapped.

By the mid-19th century parts of Bermondsey, especially along the riverside had become a notorious slum — with the arrival of industrial plants, docks and immigrant housing. The area around St Saviour’s Dock, known as Jacob’s Island, was one of the worst in London. It was immortalised by Charles Dickens’s novel Oliver Twist, in which the principal villain Bill Sikes meets a nasty end in the mud of ’Folly Ditch’ an area which was known as Hickmans Folly — the scene of an attack by Spring Heeled Jack in 1845 — surrounding Jacob’s Island. Dickens provides a vivid description of what it was like:

<CITE>... crazy wooden galleries common to the backs of half a dozen houses, with holes from which to look upon the slime beneath; windows, broken and patched, with poles thrust out, on which to dry the linen that is never there; rooms so small, so filthy, so confined, that the air would seem to be too tainted even for the dirt and squalor which they shelter; wooden chambers thrusting themselves out above the mud and threatening to fall into it — as some have done; dirt-besmeared walls and decaying foundations, every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage: all these ornament the banks of Jacob’s Island.</CITE>

Bermondsey Town Hall was built on Spa Road in 1881. The area was extensively redeveloped during the 19th century and early 20th century with the expansion of the river trade and the arrival of the railways. London’s first passenger railway terminus was built by the London to Greenwich Railway in 1836 at London Bridge. The first section to be used was between the Spa Road Station and Deptford High Street. This local station had closed by 1915.

The industrial boom of the 19th century was an extension of Bermondsey’s manufacturing role in earlier eras. As in the East End, industries that were deemed too noisome to be carried on within the narrow confines of the City of London had been located here — one such that came to dominate central Bermondsey, away from the riverfront, was the processing and trading of leather and hides. Many buildings from this era survive around Leathermarket Street including the huge Leather, Hide and Wool Exchange (now residential and small work spaces). Hepburn and Gale’s tannery (disused as of early 2007) on Long Lane is also a substantial survivor of the leather trade.

Peek, Frean and Co was established in 1857 at Dockhead, Bermondsey by James Peek and George Hender Frean. They moved to a larger plant in Clements Road in 1866, leading to the nickname ’Biscuit Town’ for Bermondsey, where they continued baking until the brand was discontinued in 1989. Wee Willie Harris (usually credited as the first British rock and roll player) came from Bermondsey. He was known as Britain’s Wild man of Rock N’ Roll). He also worked in Peak Freans.

To the east of Tower Bridge, Bermondsey’s 3½ miles of riverside were lined with warehouses and wharves, of which the best known is Butler’s Wharf. They suffered severe damage in World War II bombing and became redundant in the 1960s following the collapse of the river trade. After standing derelict for some years, many of the wharves were redeveloped under the aegis of the London Docklands Development Corporation during the 1980s. They have now been converted into a mixture of residential and commercial accommodations and have become some of the most upmarket and expensive properties in London. In 1997, US President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair visited the area to dine at the Pont de la Tour restaurant at Butler’s Wharf.

Millwall F.C. moved to a new stadium on Coldblow Lane in 1910, having previously played in Millwall, but have kept their original name despite playing at the opposite side of the River Thames to the Millwall area. They played at The Den until 1993, when they relocated to the New Den nearby. A public sports centre is also included in their stadium.

Reorganisation of lines and closure of stations left Bermondsey’s transport links with the rest of London poorer in the late twentieth century. This was remedied in 2000 with the opening of Bermondsey tube station on the Jubilee Line Extension.

Bermondsey tube station was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Thames Tunnel
TUM image id: 1554042170
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel (1960)
Credit: Ideal Homes
TUM image id: 1537131220
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Thames Tunnel
TUM image id: 1554042170
Licence: CC BY 2.0
One of the side roads leading from The Highway to Pennington Street. Possibly Artichoke Hill which is now much wider with new buildings on both sides.
TUM image id: 1556882495
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel (1960)
Credit: Ideal Homes
TUM image id: 1537131220
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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