Bayswater Road, W2

Road in/near Bayswater, existing until now

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Road · Bayswater · W2 ·
MAY
26
2021

Bayswater Road is the main road running along the northern edge of Hyde Park.

Like Oxford Street to the east, Bayswater Road follows the course of the old Roman road linking London with Silchester.

The eastern end of Bayswater Road starts at the Marble Arch junction, and in the west continues into Notting Hill Gate. It is mostly within the City of Westminster but a small portion of the road’s western end lies in Kensington and Chelsea.

By 1828, the main road (then known as Uxbridge Road) facing Kensington Gardens, had been built up between St Petersburg Place and Porchester Terrace.


The area at the bottom of Queensway (1829)
(click image to enlarge)

Along the west side of Black Lion Lane (later known as Queensway), there were houses as far as the corner of Moscow Road and more spacious villas, at first called Westbourne Terrace, further north almost reaching Pickering Place at the southern end of Westbourne Green. The east side of Black Lion Lane was still open, apart from a few large houses at the Uxbridge Road end.

A lot of this development was due to the tollbooth at the junction of Black Lion Lane and the Uxbridge/Bayswater Road, attracting the business of horse-drawn traffic waiting to pay the toll and deciding to refresh at the various inns and shops there.

Villas lined Porchester Terrace only as far as the corner of Craven Hill, which itself had cottages only on the north side. Fields survived along the Uxbridge Road from St. Agnes Villas to Bayard’s Watering Place, whence Elm Lane led northward, with some houses between it and the stream, along the line of the later Craven Terrace to the east end of Craven Hill.

By 1830, the area around Black Lion Lane was known as Bayswater.

In 1862 a ’great and aristocratic town’ had grown up, faster than all other suburbs, during the previous ten years. Houses were said to be better built and sited than before and, being near Kensington Gardens, to have a decided edge over "the solemn and obnubilated grandeur of the ill drained Belgravian flats".

Building covered the whole of Bayswater by 1865, helped by the arrival of the Metropolitan District Railway at Bayswater station (on Queensway) that decade.

Wealthy residents, who were quick to arrive, already in 1862 ranged from East India merchants to people who had moved from formerly more fashionable quarters. In 1885, Bayswater was nicknamed Asia Minor. Indian fruits and vegetables were on sale in local shops for former military and administrative professionals who had lived in the subcontinent. Other people which found themselves here late in the nineteenth century were a Jewish population and Greeks.

The fictional upper-middle class Forsyte family live in John Galsworthy’s The Forsyte Saga lived on the Bayswater Road.

Flat began to appear in place of houses during the twentieth century and by the 1960s, hotels were moving in.

Since the 1980s Bayswater has been the focus of a wave of settlement by people from the Middle East spreading from the southern end of the Edgware Road.

On Sunday mornings, over one hundred artists display their original works of art on the edge of Hyde Park close to the Italian Gardens.




Main source: A History of the County of Middlesex | British History Online
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

Reply
Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bayard’s Bridge Bayard’s Bridge took the Uxbridge Road over the River Westbourne.
Long Water The Long Water is a recreational lake in Kensington Gardens, created in 1730 at the behest of Queen Caroline.
Upton Farm Upton Farm began in 1725 and was gone by 1839.

NEARBY STREETS
Bathurst Mews, W2 Bathurst Mews is a street in Paddington.
Bathurst Street, W2 Bathurst Street is a street in Paddington.
Brook Mews North, W2 Brook Mews North is a through road between Craven Terrace and Craven Hill.
Brook Mews, W2 A street within the W2 postcode
Chilworth Street, W2 Chilworth Street is an east-west street in W2.
Cleveland Square, W2 Cleveland Square is a notable square in Paddington.
Clifton Place, W2 Clifton Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
Conduit Mews, W2 Conduit Mews is a street in Paddington.
Conduit Passage, W2 Conduit Passage is a street in Paddington.
Craven Hill Gardens, W2 Craven Hill Gardens is a residential garden estate which has two small garden squares.
Craven Hill, W2 Craven Hill is a street in Paddington.
Craven Road, W2 The Earl of Craven owned the land on which the road was later built.
Craven Terrace, W2 Craven Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Devonshire Terrace, W2 Devonshire Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Elms Lane, W2 Elms Lane in Bayswater was situated on the west bank of the Westbourne stream.
Elms Mews, W2 Elms Mews is a street in Paddington.
Fosbury Mews, W2 Fosbury Mews is a street in Paddington.
Garson House, W2 Garson House is a block on Gloucester Terrace
Gloucester Mews, W2 Gloucester Mews is a street in Paddington.
Gloucester Square, W2 Gloucester Square is a road in the W2 postcode area
Horse Ride, W2 Horse Ride is a road in the E11 postcode area
Hyde Park Gardens Mews, W2 Hyde Park Gardens Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Inverness Terrace, W2 Inverness Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Lancaster Gate, W2 Lancaster Gate is a street in Paddington.
Lancaster Mews, W2 Lancaster Mews is a street in Paddington.
Lancaster Terrace, W2 Lancaster Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Lancaster Walk, W2 Lancaster Walk is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lanchester Mews, W2 Lanchester Mews is a road in the SE14 postcode area
Leinster Gardens, W2 Leinster Gardens began its life in the early 1840s.
Leinster Mews, W2 Leinster Mews is a street in Paddington.
Leinster Terrace, W2 Leinster Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Olympia Mews, W2 Olympia Mews is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Gardens Mews, W2 Porchester Gardens Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Porchester Gardens, W2 Porchester Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Gate, W2 Porchester Gate is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Terrace, W2 Porchester Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Queen’s Gardens, W2 This is a street in the W2 postcode area
Queens Gardens, W2 Queens Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Queensborough Passage, W2 Queensborough Passage is a road in the W2 postcode area
Queensborough Terrace, W2 Queensborough Terrace was built by the grandson of John Aldridge in the 1860s on part of the Aldridge lands.
Radnor Lodge, W2 Radnor Lodge is a street in Paddington.
Radnor Mews, W2 Radnor Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Smallbrook Mews, W2 Smallbrook Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Spire House, W2 A street within the W2 postcode
Spring Street, W2 Spring Street is a street in Paddington.
Stanhope Terrace, W2 Stanhope Terrace is a road in the W2 postcode area
Sussex Place, W2 Sussex Place is a street in Paddington.
Sussex Square, W2 Sussex Square is a road in the W2 postcode area
Talbot Square, W2 Talbot Square is a street in Paddington.
Upbrook Mews, W2 Upbrook Mews is built on top of the former Westbourne River.
Westbourne Street, W2 Westbourne Street is a street in Paddington.


Bayswater

Bayswater is one of London’s most cosmopolitan areas - also one of London’s biggest concentration of hotels.

Notably, there is a significant Arabic population in Bayswater, a large number of Americans, a substantial Greek community attracted by London’s Greek Orthodox Cathedral and the area is also a centre of London’s Brazilian community.

Architecturally, the biggest part of the area is made up of Victorian mansion blocks, mostly, although not exclusively, divided up into flats. There are also purpose built apartment blocks dating from the inter-war period as well as more recent developments, and a there is large Council Estate, the 800 flat Hallfield Estate, designed by Sir Denys Lasdun and now largely sold off. There are some garden squares in the area.

Queensway and Westbourne Grove are busy High Streets, with a very large number of ethnic restaurants.

Bayswater tube station lies between Notting Hill Gate and Paddington.

The station was opened 1 October 1868, just 5 years after the London Underground started. It was renamed several times: to Bayswater (Queen’s Road) & Westbourne Grove in 1923, to Bayswater (Queen’s Road) in 1933.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
Early map of Kensington Palace
TUM image id: 1557149096
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
TUM image id: 1490459429
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chilworth Street, W2
TUM image id: 1483806751
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fountains Abbey (2020)
TUM image id: 1583775118
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Serpentine Gallery with the 2008 Pavilion. Every year since 2000 the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens has commissioned a temporary summer pavilion by a leading architect. The series presents the work of an international architect or design team who has not completed a building in England at the time of the Gallery’s invitation. Each Pavilion is completed within six months and is situated on the Gallery’s lawn for three months for the public to explore.
Credit: Wiki Commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain, in Hyde Park, London (2006). Although described as an oval stone fountain, it has the form of a large, oval stream bed of about 50 by 80 metres. The 545 individual pieces of Cornish granite were cut by S. McConnell & Sons, in Kilkeel, Northern Ireland.
Credit: Wiki Commons/CGP Grey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Chilworth Street, W2
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Fountains Abbey (2020)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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