Eversholt Street, NW1

Road in/near Somers Town, existing between the 1810s and now

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Road · Somers Town · NW1 ·
July
13
2021

Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town.

The origins of Eversholt Street lay in the 1750s when the New Road (later Euston Road) was established to bypass the congestion of London. North of this road were fields, brick works and market gardens. There was an informal path heading south from what later became Camden Town roughly along the line of the later street.

At the end of the 17th century, the Lord Chancellor John Somers acquired the local freehold. The immediate area was, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, known as Fig Mead.

The course of Eversholt Street began in the 1810s as the area developed. It provided a new route from the New Road with Camden Town. The name Eversholt Street was originally given only to its very northern, Bedford Estate part above Cranleigh Street (which was itself formerly Johnson Street). The Eversholt name refers to a village in Bedfordshire, most of the land in the village being owned by the Dukes of Bedford.

Eversholt Street is now part of a long series of streets going in the same direction with many names which starts at Bush House at the Aldwych. Kingsway becomes Southampton Row, then in turn Russell Square, Woburn Place, Tavistock Square, Upper Woburn Place and Eversholt Street.

North of the Euston Road, this part of Eversholt Street was originally Seymour Street.

At the Euston Road end of Eversholt Street/Seymour Street was, to the west of the street, the original Ampthill Square, proposed as a garden suburb by the land owner, the Duke of Bedford. Like many local names, Ampthill referred to Bedfordshire. Half of the square was bought by the London and Birmingham Railway for its tracks into Euston station and the station now dominates the southernmost section of Eversholt Street.

Ampthill Square was directly hit by a bomb during the Second World War. The Ampthill Square Estate was subsequently built in the 1960s.

Further along Eversholt Street, and before it was laid out, the first local housing was built at the Polygon in 1784. Mary Wollstonecraft lived there with her husband William Godwin, and died there in 1797 after giving birth to the future Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein. Dickens lived in the Polygon briefly as a child. The site of the Polygon is now occupied by a block of council flats called Oakshott Court.

The original name of this section of Eversholt Street was Upper Seymour Street.

In 1793 Frenchman Jacob Leroux leased land from the Somers family for building. Refugees from the French Revolution bought some of the houses and Somers Town began. Upper Seymour Street, once laid out, marked a western boundary.


Eversholt Street in Somers Town
(click image to enlarge)

Plans for a more ’select’ Somers Town deteriorated from Leroux’s plan as the surrounding land was subsequently sold off in smaller lots for cheaper housing, especially after the start of construction in the 1830s of the railway lines into Euston. In this period the area housed a large transient population of labourers and the population density of the area soared.

Briefly a small section of the street had the original name Crawley Street and finally a section which has always been called Eversholt Street.

Where the street becomes Camden High Street, there is a statue commemorating Richard Cobden at the junction where Mornington Crescent station is situated. Richard Cobden MP led the fight for the repeal of the Corn Laws in the 1840s. The statue was erected by public subscription three years after his death. The French emporer Napoleon III was the principal contributor - Cobden had been contributory in establishing a free trade agreement with France in 1860.

Eversholt Street continues northwards as Camden High Street.




Main source: Survey of London | British History Online
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply
Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

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Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

Reply
Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Agar Town Agar Town was a short-lived area, built in the 1840s, of St Pancras.
Ossulston Estate The Ossulston Estate is a multi-storey council estate built by the London County Council in Somers Town between 1927 and 1931.
Regent’s Park Estate The Regent’s Park Estate is a large housing estate in the London Borough of Camden.
Rhodes Farm Rhodes Farm was situated on Hampstead Road.
Somers Town Somers Town is a district close to three main line rail termini - Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross.
St James Gardens St James Gardens were used as a burial ground between 1790 and 1853.

NEARBY STREETS
Albert Street, NW1 Albert Street runs north-south in Camden Town.
Aldenham Street, NW1 Aldenham Street – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, gave land for the endowment of Aldenham School, Hertfordshire.
Ampthill Square, NW1 Ampthill Square is a name which has existed in two different time periods.
Augustus House, NW1 Residential block
Augustus Street, NW1 Augustus Street - after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV).
Barclay Street, NW1 Barclay Street led from Aldenham Street northwards to Medburn Street.
Barnby Street, NW1 Barnby Street is a street in Camden Town.
Bayham Place, NW1 Bayham Place is a short cobbled street.
Beatty Street, NW1 Beatty Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Bridgeway Street, NW1 Bridgeway Street is a street in Camden Town.
Brill Place, NW1 Brill Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cardington Street, NW1 Cardington Street is a rare London street in that it closed for good as late as 2017.
Carlow Street, NW1 Carlow Street is a location in London.
Chalton Street, NW1 Chalton Street was formerly Charlton Street.
Charrington Street, NW1 Charrington Street runs south to north and is a continuation of Ossulston Street.
Chenies Place, NW1 Chenies Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Christopher Place, NW1 Christopher Place is a street in Camden Town.
Church Way, NW1 Church Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Churchway, NW1 Churchway is a street in Camden Town.
Clarendon Grove, NW1 Clarendon Grove ran south from Clarendon Square.
Clarkson Row, NW1 Clarkson Row is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cooper’s Lane, NW1 Cooper’s Lane is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cranleigh Street, NW1 Cranleigh Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crowndale Court, NW1 Crowndale Court is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crowndale Road, NW1 Crowndale Road was at first called Fig Lane and then Gloucester Place.
Cumberland Market, NW1 Cumberland Market is a street in Camden Town.
Doric Way, NW1 Doric Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Drummond Crescent, NW1 Drummond Crescent is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Ernest Street, NW1 Ernest Street appears on the 1860 map as the name for part of Robert Street.
Godwin Court, NW1 Godwin Court is a street in Camden Town.
Goldington Crescent, NW1 Goldington Crescent is a street in Camden Town.
Goldington Street, NW1 Goldington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Granby Terrace, NW1 Granby Terrace was previously called Granby Street.
Hampden Close, NW1 Hampden Close is a street in Camden Town.
Hampstead Road, NW1 Hampstead Road connects the Euston Road with Camden.
Harrington Square, NW1 Harrington Square is named after the Earl of Harrington, one of whose daughters married the seventh Duke of Bedford.
Harrington Street, NW1 Harrington Street leads north from Varndell Street.
King’s Terrace, NW1 King’s Terrace was formerly Little King Street South and Little King Street North.
Lancing Street, NW1 Lancing Street is a street in Camden Town.
Lidlington Place, NW1 Lidlington Place is a street in Camden Town.
Mayford, NW1 Mayford is a street in Camden Town.
Medburn Street, NW1 Medburn Street is named after a farm between Elstree and Radlett in Hertfordshire.
Midland Road, NW1 Midland Road is a location in London.
Miller Street, NW1 Miller Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Crescent, NW1 Mornington Crescent was named after Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington.
Mornington Street, NW1 Mornington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Terrace, NW1 Mornington Terrace is a street in Camden Town.
Nash Street, NW1 Nash Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Oakley Square, NW1 Oakley Square is a street in Camden Town.
Oakshott Court, NW1 Oakshott Court is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Ossulston Street, NW1 Ossulston Street is a street in Camden Town.
Pancras Road, NW1 Pancras Road is a street in Camden Town.
Park Village East, NW1 Park Village East was part of a proposed canal-side village.
Penryn Street, NW1 Penryn Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Phoenix Road, NW1 Phoenix Road is a street in Camden Town.
Polygon Road, NW1 Polygon Road is a street in Camden Town.
Purchese Street, NW1 Purchese Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Redhill Street, NW1 Redhill Street is a street in Camden Town.
Richmond House, NW1 Richmond House is a block on Park Village East
Robert Street, NW1 Robert Street is a street in Camden Town.
Seymour House, NW1 Residential block
Somers Close, NW1 Somers Close is a road in the NW1 postcode area
St Pancras Cruising Club, N1C St Pancras Cruising Club is a road in the N1C postcode area
Stanhope Parade, NW1 Stanhope Parade is a street in Camden Town.
Stanhope Street, NW1 Stanhope Street runs parallel to Hampstead Road, one block west.
The Polygon, NW1 The Polygon was an earky housing estate, a Georgian building with 15 sides and three storeys that contained 32 houses.
Unity Mews, NW1 Unity Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Varndell Street, NW1 Varndell Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Watford Street, NW1 Watford Street was cleared away in the 1860s to make way to St Pancras station.
Werrington Street, NW1 Werrington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Whittlebury Street, NW1 Whittlebury Street once laid to the west of Euston station.
Wilsted Street, NW1 Wilsted Street was the original name for the lower end of Ossulston Street.

NEARBY PUBS
Beatrice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cock Tavern The Cock Tavern is on the corner of Phoenix Road and Chalton Street.
Doric Arch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Eastnor Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Elixir Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Koko This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lyttleton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Arthur This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Royal George This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Secrets This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Aloysius Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Purple Turtle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rocket This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sheephaven Bay This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Victory This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Somers Town

Somers Town is a district close to three main line rail termini - Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross.

Historically, the name Somers Town was used for the larger triangular area between the Pancras, Hampstead, and Euston Roads, but it is now taken to mean the rough rectangle bounded by Pancras Road, Euston Road and Eversholt Street.

Somers Town was named after Charles Cocks, 1st Baron Somers (1725–1806). The area was originally granted by William III to John Somers (1651–1716), Lord Chancellor and Baron Somers of Evesham.

In the mid 1750s the New Road was established to bypass the congestion of London; Somers Town lay immediately north of this east-west toll road. In 1784, the first housing was built at the Polygon amid fields, brick works and market gardens on the northern fringes of London. The site of the Polygon is now occupied by a block of council flats called Oakshott Court.

The Polygon deteriorated socially as the surrounding land was subsequently sold off in smaller lots for cheaper housing, especially after the start of construction in the 1830s of the railway lines into Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross. In this period the area housed a large transient population of labourers and the population density of the area soared. By the late 19th century most of the houses were in multiple occupation, and overcrowding was severe with whole families sometimes living in one room, as confirmed by the social surveys of Charles Booth and Irene Barclay.

When St Luke’s Church, near King’s Cross, was demolished to make way for the construction of the Midland Railway St Pancras Station and its Midland Grand Hotel, the estimated twelve thousand inhabitants of Somers Town at that time were deprived of that place of worship, as the church building was re-erected in Kentish Town. In 1868 the lace merchant and philanthropist George Moore funded a new church, known as Christ Church, and an associated school in Chalton Street with an entrance in Ossulston Street. The school accommodated about six hundred children. Christ Church and the adjacent school were destroyed in a World War II bombing raid and no trace remains today, the site being occupied by a children’s play area and sports court.

Improvement of the slum housing conditions, amongst the worst in the capital, was first undertaken by St Pancras Council in 1906 at Goldington Buildings, at the junction of Pancras Road and Royal College Street, and continued on a larger scale by the St Pancras House Improvement Society (subsequently the St Pancras & Humanist Housing Association, the present owner of Goldington Buildings) which was established in 1924. Further social housing was built by the London County Council, which began construction of the Ossulston Estate in 1927. There remains a small number of older Grade 2 listed properties, mostly Georgian terraced houses.

During the early 1970s the neighbourhood comprising GLC-owned housing in Charrington, Penryn, Platt and Medburn Streets was a centre for the squatting movement.

In the 1980s, some council tenants took advantage of the ’right to buy’ scheme and bought their homes at a substantial discount. Later they moved away from the area. The consequence was an influx of young semi-professional people, resulting in a changing population.

Major construction work along the eastern side of Somers Town was completed in 2008, to allow for the Eurostar trains to arrive at the refurbished St Pancras Station. This involved the excavation of part of the St Pancras Old Churchyard, the human remains being re-interred at St Pancras and Islington Cemetery in East Finchley.

Land at Brill Place, previously earmarked for later phases of the British Library development, became available when the library expansion was cancelled and was used as site offices for the HS1 terminal development and partly to allow for excavation of a tunnel for the new Thameslink station. It was then acquired as the site for the Francis Crick Institute (formerly the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation), a major medical research institute.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
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Camden Town 1920s.
TUM image id: 1557159163
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Agar Town (1857)
Credit: Percy Lovell
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All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
TUM image id: 1492970567
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Camden High Street
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The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
TUM image id: 1499354315
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In the neighbourhood...

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Camden Town 1920s.
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The Camden Head on Camden High Street, taken in 1903. The Camden Head is a public house and live venue which first opened towards the end of the 19th century.
Old London postcard
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Agar Town (1857)
Credit: Percy Lovell
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All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
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Camden High Street
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Camden Town, from the Hampstead Road, Marylebone (1780) This shows the fields of Rhodes Farm. later to become the site of Euston station.
Credit: Old and New London: Volume 5 (1878)
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Mornington Crescent, northwest quadrant (1904). The view includes no.31 where Spencer Gore rented a room between 1909–12.
Credit: Camden Local Studies and Archives Centre
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Extract from Map of the parish of St Marylebone and parish of St Pancras in London, 1797
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
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Harrington Street, NW1 about the turn of the twentieth century. This street runs parallel with Hampstead Road, one block west.
Old London postcard
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