Royal Aeronautical Society

Club in/near Mayfair, existing between 1866 and now

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Club · Mayfair · W1J ·
December
10
2020

The Royal Aeronautical Society, also known as the RAeS, is a British-founded multidisciplinary professional institution dedicated to the global aerospace community.

The objectives of Society include: to support and maintain high professional standards in aerospace disciplines; to provide a unique source of specialist information and a local forum for the exchange of ideas; and to exert influence in the interests of aerospace in the public and industrial arenas.

The Society was founded in January 1866 with the name The Aeronautical Society of Great Britain. Early or founding members included James Glaisher, Francis Wenham, the Duke of Argyll, and Frederick Brearey. In the first year, there were 65 members. In 1868 the Society held a major exhibition at London’s Crystal Palace - John Stringfellow’s steam engine was shown there. The Society sponsored the first wind tunnel in 1870-71, designed by Wenham and Browning.

In 1918, the organization’s name was changed to the Royal Aeronautical Society.

During the 1940s, the RAeS responded to the wartime need to expand the aircraft industry. The Society established a Technical Department to bring together the best available knowledge and present it in an authoritative and accessible form – a working tool for engineers who might come from other industries and lack the specialised knowledge required for aircraft design. This technical department became known as the Engineering Sciences Data Unit (ESDU) and eventually became a separate entity in the 1980s.

In 1987 the Society of Licensed Aircraft Engineers and Technologists, previously called the Society of Licensed Aircraft Engineers, was incorporated into the Royal Aeronautical Society.

The Royal Aeronautical Society is now a worldwide society with an international network of nearly 70 branches. Many practitioners of aerospace disciplines use the Society’s designatory post-nominals such as FRAeS, CRAeS, MRAeS, AMRAeS and ARAeS.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
25 Park Lane 25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon.
48 Belgrave Square 48 Belgrave Square was occupied for the same family for 170 years.
An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus, Mr Gladstone Travelling with Ordinary Passengers, 1885
Down Street Down Street, also known as Down Street (Mayfair), is a disused station on the London Underground, located in Mayfair.
Halkin Hotel The Halkin (styled as The Halkin by COMO) is a 5-star hotel.
Hyde Park Corner At the other end of Park Lane from Marble Arch, Hyde Park Corner has struck terror into many a learner driver.
InterContinental London InterContinental London Park Lane is a luxury 5-star hotel.
Londonderry House Londonderry House was an aristocratic townhouse situated on Park Lane.
Memorial Gates The Memorial Gates are a war memorial located at the Hyde Park Corner end of Constitution Hill in London.
Parkside Park Side was situated on the north side of Knightsbridge.
RAF Bomber Command Memorial The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial is a memorial commemorating the crews of RAF Bomber Command who embarked on missions during the Second World War.
Royal Aeronautical Society The Royal Aeronautical Society, also known as the RAeS, is a British-founded multidisciplinary professional institution dedicated to the global aerospace community.
Royal Air Force Club The Royal Air Force Club (often referred to as the RAF Club) is situated at 128 Piccadilly.
Royal Artillery Memorial The Royal Artillery Memorial is a stone memorial at Hyde Park Corner, dedicated to the First World War casualties of the Royal Regiment of Artillery.
Shepherd Market Shepherd Market was described by Arthur Bingham Walkley in 1925 as one of the oddest incongruities in London.
St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge is a Grade II* listed Anglican church.
The Athenaeum Hotel The Athenaeum is a family-owned five-star hotel overlooking Green Park.
The Berkeley The Berkeley is a five star deluxe hotel, located in Wilton Place.
Wellington Arch Wellington Arch is located to the south of Hyde Park at the western corner of Green Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Achilles Way, W1K Achilles Way is named for the nearby Wellington as Achilles statue in Hyde Park.
Ann’s Close, SW1X Ann’s Close is approached through an entrance under a building on Kinnerton Street.
Apsley Way, SW1X Apsley Way is the formal name for the pathway which runs under Wellington Arch.
Ashburton Place, W1J Ashburton Place connects Clarges Street and Bolton Street.
Audley Square, W1K Audley Square is named after Hugh Audley.
Berkeley Street, W1J Berkeley Street runs from Piccadilly to Berkeley Square.
Bolton Street, W1J Bolton Street runs from Curzon Street in the north to Piccadilly in the south.
Bradbrook House, SW1X Bradbrook House is a residential block on Duplex Ride.
Brick Street, W1J Brick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Carrington Street, W1J Carrington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Charles Street, W1J Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield Gardens, W1J Chesterfield Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield Street, W1J Chesterfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Clarges Mews, W1J Clarges Mews is a mews at the top of Clarges Street.
Clarges Street, W1J Clarges Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Constitution Hill, SW1A Constitution Hill connects Buckingham Palace with Hyde Park Corner.
Curzon Square, W1K Curzon Square is a road in the W1K postcode area
Curzon Street, W1J Curzon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Deanery Street, W1K Deanery Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Derby Street, W1J Derby Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Dorchester Ride, W1K Dorchester Ride is a road in the W1K postcode area
Down Street Mews, W1J Down Street Mews is a largely hidden side street in Mayfair.
Down Street, W1J Down Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Duke of Wellington Place, SW1X Duke of Wellington Place is the official name for the road which skirts the central Hyde Park Corner island on the south and east sides.
Duplex Ride, SW1X Duplex Ride is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Frederic Mews, SW1X Frederic Mews is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Garrick House, W1J Residential block
Grosvenor Crescent Mews, SW1X Grosvenor Crescent Mews is a gated mews.
Grosvenor Crescent, SW1X Grosvenor Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Grosvenor Place, SW1X Grosvenor Place is the main road connecting Hyde Park Corner with Victoria.
Half Moon Street, W1J Half Moon Street runs between Piccadilly and Curzon Street.
Halkin Street, SW1X Halkin Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Hamilton Mews, W1J Hamilton Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hamilton Place, W1J Hamilton Place lies just to the north of Hyde Park Corner.
Headfort Place, SW1X Headfort Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Hertford Street, W1J Hertford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Hyde Park Corner, W1J Hyde Park Corner is a major road junction at the southeastern corner of Hyde Park.
Kinnerton Place North, SW1X Kinnerton Place North is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Kinnerton Place South, SW1X Kinnerton Place South is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Kinnerton Street, SW1X Kinnerton Street - a small winding street - was originally the service road for Wilton Place and Wilton Crescent.
Kinnerton Yard, SW1X Kinnerton Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Knightsbridge, SW1X Knightsbridge is a main thoroughfare running along the south side of Hyde Park.
Lanesborough Place, SW1X Lanesborough Place is a small street serving The Lanesborough Hotel.
Lovers’ Walk, W1K Lovers’ Walk is a road in the W1K postcode area
Market Mews, W1J Market Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Mayfair Place, W1J Mayfair Place runs behind Devonshire House.
Old Barrack Yard, SW1X Old Barrack Yard is a narrow street of terraced cottages.
Old Park Lane, W1J Old Park Lane is a road in the W1J postcode area
Park Towers, W1J Park Towers is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Pembroke Close, SW1X Pembroke Close is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Piccadilly, W1J Piccadilly is a major road in the West End.
Pitt’s Head Mews, W1K Pitt’s Head Mews is a road in the W1J postcode area
Queen Street, W1J Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Red Lion Yard, W1J Red Lion Yard is a road in the W1K postcode area
Shepherd Market, W1J Shepherd Market was developed between 1735 and 1746 by Edward Shepherd from an open area called Brook Field
Shepherd Street, W1J Shepherd Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Stanhope Gate, W1K Stanhope Gate is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Stanhope Row, W1J Stanhope Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Stratton Street, W1J Stratton Street forms an L shape between Piccadilly and Berkeley Street.
Studio Place, SW1X Studio Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Tilney Street, W1K Tilney Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Trebeck Street, W1J Trebeck Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Waverton Street, W1J Waverton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
White Horse Street, W1J White Horse Street runs from Piccadilly to Shepherd Street.
William Mews, SW1X William Mews is a partially redeveloped, private Mews off Lowndes Square.
William Mews, SW1X A street within the SW1X postcode
Wilton Crescent, SW1X Wilton Crescent is notable for its affluent and politically important list of residents, present and historic.
Wilton Place, SW1X Wilton Place was built in 1825 to connect Belgravia with Knightsbridge.
Wilton Row, SW1X Wilton Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Yarmouth Place, W1J Yarmouth Place lies off Brick Street.

NEARBY PUBS
Burger & Lobster This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Drama This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Henry’s Cafe Bar Piccadilly This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Market Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose & Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shepherds Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Mayfair

Mayfair (originally called The May Fair) is an area of central London, by the east edge of Hyde Park. Mayfair boasts some of the capital’s most exclusive property of all types.

Mayfair is named after the annual fortnight-long May Fair that took place on the site that is Shepherd Market today. In 1764, the May Fair was banned at Shepherd Market because the well-to-do residents of the area disliked the fair’s disorderliness, and it moved to Fair Field in Bow in the East End of London.

The district is now mainly commercial, with many former homes converted into offices for major corporations headquarters, embassies and also hedge funds and real estate businesses. There remains a substantial quantity of residential property as well as some exclusive shopping and London’s largest concentration of luxury hotels and many restaurants. Rents are among the highest in London and the world.

The freehold of a large section of Mayfair also belongs to the Crown Estate.

The renown and prestige of Mayfair could have grown in the popular mind because it is the most expensive property on the British Monopoly set. Victor Watson, the head of Waddingtons at the time, and his secretary Marjory Phillips, chose the London place names for the British version — Ms Phillips apparently went for a walk around London to choose suitable sites.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The 52 bus
TUM image id: 1556876554
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
TUM image id: 1586353394
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Wellington Statue on the Arch in the 1850s
Credit: Unknown
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Exterior of the memorial in 2013.
Credit: Tim Rademacher
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The 52 bus
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wellington Arch photographed on 10 January 2017. Wellington Arch was built as an original entrance to Buckingham Palace, later becoming a victory arch proclaiming Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon. Crowned by the largest bronze sculpture in Europe, it depicts the Angel of Peace descending on the ’Quadriga’ - or four-horsed chariot - of War. The pathway that runs underneath the arch has a formal name - Apsley Way.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Letter to Chuck Berry from Carl Sagan
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Grosvenor Gardens Mews East
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Hyde Park Corner in 1842, looking east towards Piccadilly. The entrance to Hyde Park through Decimus Burton’s Ionic Screen is on the left, and behind it, in darker stone, is Apsley House.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The distinctive Leslie Green red tiling of the former Down Street station frames the entrance to a mews which predates the station - Down Street Mews.
Credit: The Underground Map
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