Kensington Place, W8

Road in/near Kensington

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(51.50778 -0.19597, 51.507 -0.195) 
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Road · Kensington · W8 ·
JANUARY
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2000

Kensington Place is a street in Kensington.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


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Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:21 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Remember the Lucas family think the eldest was about same age as me cant remember his name though seem to rember had several younger sisters may have been twins!!

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 18:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Went to that coranation party with my two younger brothers who both went to St Clements along with Alan Mullery the footballer. I went to St James before moving on to St Johns along with Alan who lived in Mary Place where we were both in the same class.

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donna    
Added: 25 Jan 2021 13:25 GMT   

Ladbroke Dwellings
Three generations of my family lived along this row of dwellings, ’Ladbroke Dwellings’. All the men who lived there worked at the Gasworks. Among the shops you mention was Wilson’s sweet shop run by Maggie and her sister, and Johns grocery store. I believe there was also a photograph studio there too.



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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.

NEARBY STREETS
Airlie Gardens, W8 Airlie Gardens is named after the 5th Earl of Airlie (1826-1881), who lived on nearby Campden Hill at Holly Lodge.
Aubrey Road, W8 Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s.
Aubrey Walk, W8 Aubrey Walk runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill.
Bedford Gardens, W8 Bedford Gardens is one of the prime residential streets in Kensington.
Berkeley Gardens, W8 Berkeley Gardens is a short street which runs between Brunswick Gardens and Kensington Church Street containing terraced houses on both sides with small front gardens.
Brunswick Gardens, W8 Brunswick Gardens runs north from Vicarage Gate - a wide tree-lined road with white stuccoed terraces on either side.
Bulmer Mews, W11 Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate.
Callcott Street, W8 Callcott Street is a small street between Uxbridge Street and Hillgate Place.
Campden Grove, W8 Campden Grove runs between Kensington Church Street and Hornton Street.
Campden Hill Close, W8 Campden Hill Close is a small cul-de-sac entered by a narrow driveway off Hornton Street.
Campden Hill Gardens, W8 Campden Hill Gardens runs northwards from Aubrey Walk.
Campden Hill Place, W11 Campden Hill Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Campden Hill Road, W8 Campden Hill Road is a street in Kensington.
Campden Hill Square, W8 Campden Hill Square is a residential square consisting of large family houses.
Campden Hill Towers, W11 Campden Hill Towers is a block.
Campden Hill, W8 Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington.
Campden Street, W8 Campden Street stretches between Campden Hill Road and Kensington Church Street.
Caroline Place Mews, W2 Caroline Place Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Caroline Place, W2 Caroline Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
Clanricarde Gardens, W2 Clanricarde Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Edge Street, W8 Edge Street is a street in Kensington.
Farm Place, W8 Farm Place was formerly called Earnest Street.
Farmer Street, W8 Farmer Street was formerly Farm Street.
Gloucester Walk, W8 Gloucester Walk is a road in the W8 postcode area
Hillgate Place, W8 Hillgate Place was formerly Dartmoor Street.
Hillgate Street, W8 Hillgate Street was formerly Johnson Street.
Hillsleigh Road, W8 Hillsleigh Road is a street in Kensington.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Kensington.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road.
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill.
Inverness Gardens, W8 Inverness Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Jameson Street, W8 Jameson Street was formerly St James or James Street.
Kensington Church Street, W8 Kensington Church Street is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Mall, W8 Kensington Mall is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 Kensington Palace Gardens is a street in west central London with some of the most expensive properties in the world.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Linden Gardens, W11 Linden Gardens is a cul-de-sac and the first of James Ladbroke’s plots to be developed.
Linden Mews, W2 Linden Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lucerne Mews, W8 Lucerne Mews is a street in Kensington.
Melon Place, W8 Melon Place is a street in Kensington.
Newcombe House, W2 Residential block
Notting Hill Gate, W8 Notting Hill Gate is a main shopping and retail street.
Observatory Gardens, W8 Observatory Gardens commemorates what was the world’s finest private observatory.
Orme Court, W2 Orme Court is a street in Paddington.
Orme Lane, W2 Orme Lane is a road in the W2 postcode area
Orme Square, W2 Orme Square is named after Edward Orme, formerly a printseller in Bond Street.
Ossington Street, W2 Ossington Street leads from Moscow Road at its north end to the Bayswater Road at its south end.
Palace Court, W2 Palace Court was built in the 1880s to connect the Bayswater Road to Moscow Road.
Palace Gardens Mews, W8 Palace Gardens Mews is a street in Kensington.
Palace Gardens Terrace, W8 Palace Gardens Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Palace Green, W8 Palace Green is a street in Kensington.
Peel Street, W8 Peel Street is a street in Kensington.
Pembridge Gardens, W11 Pembridge Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Pembridge Road, W11 Pembridge Road is a street in London
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane.
Rabbit Roe, W8 Rabbit Roe is a street in Kensington.
Sheffield Terrace, W8 Sheffield Terrace is a street in Kensington.
St Mary Abbots Vicarage, W8 St Mary Abbots Vicarage is a street in Kensington.
St Petersburgh Mews, W2 St Petersburgh Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
St Petersburgh Place, W2 St Petersburgh Place is a street in Paddington.
Thornwood Gardens, W8 Thornwood Gardens is a road in the W8 postcode area
Tor Court, W8 Tor Court is a block on Hornton Street
Tor Gardens, W8 Tor Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Uxbridge Street, W8 Uxbridge Street is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Court, W8 Vicarage Court is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gardens, W8 Vicarage Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gate, W8 Vicarage Gate is a street in Kensington.
Victoria Gardens, W11 Victoria Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Victoria Mews, W11 Victoria Mews is a location in London.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wycombe Square, W8 Wycombe Square is a road in the W8 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Churchill Arms The Churchill Arms was built in about 1824.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Ladbroke Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mall Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Notting Hill Arts Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Polpo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Albert The Prince Albert has been a Notting Hill feature since the 1840s.
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sun in Splendour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Champion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hillgate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Little Yellow Door This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Uxbridge Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Windsor Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Kensington

Kensington is a district of West London, England within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, located west of Charing Cross.

The focus of the area is Kensington High Street, a busy commercial centre with many shops, typically upmarket. The street was declared London's second best shopping street in February 2005 thanks to its range and number of shops.

The edges of Kensington are not well-defined; in particular, the southern part of Kensington blurs into Chelsea, which has a similar architectural style. To the west, a transition is made across the West London railway line and Earl's Court Road further south into other districts, whilst to the north, the only obvious dividing line is Holland Park Avenue, to the north of which is the similar district of Notting Hill.

Kensington is, in general, an extremely affluent area, a trait that it now shares with its neighbour to the south, Chelsea. The area has some of London's most expensive streets and garden squares.

Kensington is also very densely populated; it forms part of the most densely populated local government district (the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea) in the United Kingdom. This high density is not formed from high-rise buildings; instead, it has come about through the subdivision of large mid-rise Victorian and Georgian terraced houses (generally of some four to six floors) into flats.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Early map of Kensington Palace
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Ladbroke Square Garden
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Abingdon Arms Pub, Abingdon Road.
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In the neighbourhood...

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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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The Churchill Arms, Kensington
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Ladbroke Walk seen from Ladbroke Terrace (2006)
Credit: Thomas Erskine
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Archer Street which became the westernmost section of Westbourne Grove.
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Horbury Mews
Credit: Ivan Moskalev
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Notting Hill Gate - showing the two station buildings (Central and Metropolitan) opposite each other
Old London postcard
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