Oxford Circus

Underground station, existing between the 1900s and now

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Underground station · * · W1F ·
October
23
2020

Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

Oxford Circus, the busy intersection of Oxford Street and Regent Street, was constructed in the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash. Regent Street had been commissioned by Prince Regent, who was later to become King George IV, as a grand scheme to connect the Princes home at Carlton House with his newly acquired property at Regents Park. Nash designed a wide boulevard with a sweeping curve that became a clear dividing line between the less respectable Soho and the fashionable squares and streets of Mayfair. Born from the concept of Nash’s layout of the New Street in 1812, frontage alignments remain, with the rebuilt listed architecture of 1920s buildings.

The surrounding area contains important elements of the Nash heritage. All frontages on the Circus are Grade II Listed. The entirety of Regent Street is also listed and sits within a conservation area.

The circus is served by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.

Oxford Circus station has entrances on all four corners of the intersection. The station is an interchange between the Central, Victoria and Bakerloo lines. It is the fourth busiest station on the network and the busiest without connection to the National Rail service. It opened on the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900, with the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway’s platforms opening on 10 March 1906. The two companies had separate surface buildings and lift shafts. The station buildings, which remain today as exits from the station, were constructed on very confined plots on either side of Argyll Street on the south side of Oxford Street, just to the east of the circus itself. The stations were originally built as entirely separate, but connecting passages were swiftly provided at platform level. The surviving Central London Railway building to the east of Argyll Street is the best surviving example of the stations designed by Harry Bell Measures, and the Bakerloo line building to the west is a classic Leslie Green structure. Both station buildings are Grade II listed.

Almost from the outset, overcrowding has been a constant problem at the station and it has seen numerous improvements to its facilities and below-ground arrangements to deal with this difficulty. After much discussion between the then two separate operators, a major reconstruction began in 1912. This saw a new ticket hall, dealing with both lines, built in the basement of the Bakerloo station, the Bakerloo lifts removed, and new deep-level escalators opened down to the Bakerloo line level. Access to the Central line was by way of existing deep-level subways. The new works came into use on 9 May 1914 with the CLR lifts still available for passengers. By 1923 even this rearrangement was unable to cope, so a second rebuilding commenced. This saw a second set of escalators built directly down to the Central line, the CLR station building becoming an exit only. Then, on 2 October 1928, a third escalator leading to the Bakerloo platforms was opened. Unusually, lifts came back into prominence at an Underground station when, in 1942, a set of high-speed lifts came into use, largely used as an exit route from the Central line platforms directly to the Argyll Street exit building.

The Victoria line opened on 7 March 1969. To handle the additional passenger loads, a new ticket hall was constructed directly under the road junction. To excavate the new ticket hall below the roadway, traffic was diverted for five years (August 1963 to Easter 1968) on to a temporary bridge-like structure known as the ’umbrella’ covering the Regent Street/Oxford Street intersection. Services tunnels were constructed to carry water mains and telecom cables past the new ticket hall. Construction of the Victoria line station tunnels with their platforms, the new escalator shafts and the linking passages to the Central line platforms was carried out from access shafts sunk from nearby Cavendish Square, Upper Regent Street and Argyll Street. To this day, traffic passing through the Oxford Circus intersection literally travels over the roof of the ticket office.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

Reply
Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply

Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

Reply
Comment
Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

Reply
Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

Reply
Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Adam and Eve Inn The Adam and Eve was an inn on Oxford Street.
All Souls Church All Souls Church is an evangelical Anglican church situated at the north end of Regent Street.
Oxford Circus Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

THE STREETS OF OXFORD CIRCUS
Binney Street, W1K Binney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Blenheim Street, W1S Blenheim Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Cavendish Place, W1G Cavendish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Chandos Street, W1G Chandos Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Davies Mews, W1K Davies Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Davies Street, W1K Davies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Davis Street, W1K Davis Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Dering Street, W1S Dering Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Duke Street, W1K Duke Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Gilbert Street, W1K Gilbert Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Hanover Square, W1S Hanover Square was created as the ’Whig’ square with Cavendish Square being the ’Tory’ square.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Harewood Place, W1C Harewood Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Haunch Of Venison Yard, W1K Haunch Of Venison Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
John Prince’s Street, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
John Princes Street, W1G John Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Langham House, W1B Residential block
Langham Place, W1B Langham Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Margaret Street, W1G Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Marylebone Lane, W1C Marylebone Lane is a road in the W1C postcode area
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Old Cavendish Street, W1 Old Cavendish Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Street, W1C This is a street in the W1A postcode area
Oxford Street, W1D This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Princes Street, W1B Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Ramillies Place, W1F Ramillies Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ramillies Street, W1F Ramillies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Sandgate Trading Estate, W1K A street within the W1K postcode
Sedley Place, W1K Sedley Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Sedley Place, W1S Sedley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
South Molton Lane, W1K South Molton Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Molton Street, W1K South Molton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
St George Street, W1S St George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
St Georges Square, W1S St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
St. Anselm’s Place, W1K St. Anselm’s Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Swallow Place, W1B Swallow Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Tenterden Street, W1S Tenterden Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Weighhouse Street, W1K Weighhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
West One Shopping Centre, W1C West One Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is a road in the W1D postcode area
Woodstock Street, W1S Woodstock Street is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.

THE PUBS OF OXFORD CIRCUS
Argyll Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bonds This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Gigis Mayfair This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Maddox Club And Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Masons Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Spread Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Burlington Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Finery This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Phoenix This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Running Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
BT Tower
TUM image id: 1481989234
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Entrance to Pickering Place
TUM image id: 1499523671
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tottenham Court Road, W1T
TUM image id: 1466596673
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Bilingual Wardour Street
TUM image id: 1526420734
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Waterloo Place (1913)
TUM image id: 1466520232
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
BT Tower
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The Prince of Wales Theatre in 1903 shortly before its demolition for the building of the Scala Theatre in 1904.
Credit: Caroline Blomfield
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Piccadilly Theatre (2007)
Credit: Turquoisefish
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Wells Street, W1
Credit: The Underground Map
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Kemp’s Court is a small side street of Berwick Street Market and where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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