Lisson Grove, NW1

Road in/near Queen’s Park, existing until now

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(51.52238 -0.16531, 51.522 -0.165) 
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Road · * · NW1 ·
JUNE
26
2020

The southern end of Lisson Grove was the location of a hamlet and open space, both called Lisson Green.

10166
Lisson Green is described as a hamlet in the Domesday book.

Originally Lisson Grove was part of the medieval manor of Lilestone which stretched north to Hampstead. Lisson Green broke away as a new manor in 1236 and had its own manor house.

’Lissing Green’ becames a recreation area for Londoners. By the 1790s, the Green was a large open space stretching down to Chapel Street and the Old Marylebone Road. Beside it on Lisson Grove, the Lissing Green/Lissom Grove village was part of a network of country lanes, on the east side of Edgware Road. At the southern end of the Green was the Yorkshire Stingo inn from whence stagecoaches set off for all parts.

Earlier, in 1771, Lisson Green was bought by James Stephens and Daniel Bullock, manufacturers of white lead. They set up the White Lead Manufactory next to the Nursery Garden, with unrecorded consequences to health. But until the late 18th century the district remained essentially rural.

In 1821 Sir Edward Baker, who gave his name to Baker Street, purchased land from Daniel Bullock and built houses on it. The result was to wipe out Lisson Green.

The arrival of the Regent’s Canal in 1810 and the railway at Marylebone in 1899 led to rapid urbanisation of Lisson Grove. As the nineteenth century wore on, the area developed into a slum - there was extreme poverty and the squalor of the homes was notorious. The area was known for drinking, crime and prostitution.

Following the First World War, Prime Minister David Lloyd George announced the ’Homes Fit for Heroes’ scheme. Lisson Grove was to benefit from the plan. In 1924, the Metropolitan Borogh of St Marylebone completed the Fisherton Street Estate of seven blocks built in red-brick neo-Georgian style grouped around courtyards. Noted for their innovation, they were some of the first social housing to include an indoor bathroom and toilet.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

Reply
Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

Reply

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Edgware Road Edgware Road station was a station on the world’s first underground railway.
Hyett’s hand-drawn 1807 map William Hyett produced an amazingly accurate map of the London countryside in 1807, using just pen and paper.

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NEARBY PUBS
Barrack Field This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Larrik This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Temperance This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Thornbury Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Two Point Bar & Kitchen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Windsor Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Montagu House, Portman Square
TUM image id: 1510140427
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fountains Abbey (2020)
TUM image id: 1583775118
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Portman Square, W1H
TUM image id: 1510141130
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Abbey lodge as it appeared on the 1872 Ordnance Survey map. It faces Park Road with Hanover Gate to its north and Hanover Terrace behind.
Credit: Crown Copyright (expired)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

view of Balcombe Street, Marylebone (2007) In 1975, there was a siege in Balcombe Street where the Provisional IRA took two hostages and a six day siege with the Metropolitan Police ensued
Credit: Geograph/Oxyman
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Shillibeer Place sign
Credit: London Transport Museum
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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