Park Row, SE10

Road in/near Greenwich

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(51.48327 -0.00297, 51.483 -0.002) 
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Road · Greenwich · SE10 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Park Row is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Greenwich Foot Tunnel The Greenwich Foot Tunnel crosses beneath the River Thames linking Greenwich on the south bank with Millwall (Island Gardens) on the north.

NEARBY STREETS
Anchor Iron Wharf, SE10 Anchor Iron Wharf are modern flats beside Ballast Quay
Ballast Quay, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Banning Street, SE10 Banning Street, formerly Chester Street, dates from 1845.
Bellot Gardens, SE10 Bellot Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Braddyll Street, SE10 Braddyll Street dates from 1852.
Caradoc Street, SE10 Caradoc Street was built between 1852 and 1855.
Carville Court, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Chrisp House, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
College Approach, SE10 College Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
College Way, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Collington Street, Collington Street connects Hoskins Street with Lassell Street.
Corvette Square, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Crane Street, SE10 Crane Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Creed Passage, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Crescent Arcade, SE10 Crescent Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Crowleys Wharf, SE10 Crowleys Wharf is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Cutty Sark Gardens, SE10 Cutty Sark Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Douglas Path, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Durnford Street, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Eastney Street, SE10 Eastney Street is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Enderby Street, SE10 Enderby Street began its life as Newcastle Street in 1853.
Feathers Place, SE10 Feathers Place is situated to the east of Greenwich town centre.
Frobisher Passage, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Frobisher Street, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Frys Court, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Gibson Street, SE10 Gibson Street is the southern continuation of Enderby Street.
Greenwich Church Street, SE10 Greenwich Church Street marks the entrance to Greenwich Market.
Greenwich Market, SE10 Greenwich Market is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Greenwich Park Street, SE10 Greenwich Park Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Hadrian Street, SE10 Hadrian Street was originally called Northumberland Street.
High Bridge Wharf, SE10 High Bridge Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
High Bridge, SE10 High Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Highbridge Wharf, SE10 Highbridge Wharf is a road in the E14 postcode area
Hoskins Street, SE10 Hoskins Street is a road in the SE10 postcode area
King William Lane, SE10 King William Lane is a road in the SE10 postcode area
King William Walk, SE10 King William Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Kossuth Street, SE10 Kossuth Street is named after Lajos Kossuth, Hungarian national hero who lived in London in the 1850s.
Lassell Street, SE10 Lassell Street began life around 1851.
Lemmon Road, SE10 Lemmon Road is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Maritime Museum Repository, SE10 Maritime Museum Repository is a road in the SE3 postcode area
Maze Hill, SE10 Maze Hill is believed to have taken its name from Sir Algernon May.
Mell Street, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Merchants House, SE10 Merchants House is a block on Merchants Row.
Merchants Row, SE10 Merchants Row is the northern extention of Hoskings Street.
Naval Walk, SE10 Naval Walk is a road in the BR2 postcode area
Nelson Arcade, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Nelson Road, SE10 Nelson Road is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Nevada Street, SE10 Nevada Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Old Royal Naval College, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Old Woolwich Public Baths, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Old Woolwich Road, SE10 Old Woolwich Road is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Orlop Street, SE10 Orlop Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Park Vista, SE10 Park Vista runs west from Maze Hill.
Pelton Road, SE10 Pelton Road was one of the Greenwich streets named after the coal industry of County Durham.
Rockfield House, SE10 Rockfield House overlooks the Cutty Sark in Greenwich.
Romney Road, SE10 Romney Road was built by Henry Sydney, 1st Earl of Romney.
St. Alfege Passage, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Stockwell Street Greenwich, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Stockwell Street, SE10 Stockwell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Thalia Close, SE10 Thalia Close runs off Feathers Place.
The Forum At Greenwich, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
The Old Royal Naval College, SE10 The Old Royal Naval College is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Thornley Place, SE10 Thornley Place was originally part of Braddyll Street.
Tom Smith Close, SE10 Tom Smith Close is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Trafalgar Grove, SE10 Trafalgar Grove is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Trafalgar Road, SE10 Trafalgar Road is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Trenchard Street, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Turnpin Lane, SE10 Turnpin Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Tuskar Street, SE10 Tuskar Street is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Vanbrugh Hill Health Centre, SE10 Vanbrugh Hill Health Centre is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Woodland Crescent, SE10 Woodland Crescent is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Woodland Grove, SE10 A street within the SE10 postcode
Woodland Walk, SE10 Woodland Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.
Woodlands Park Road, SE10 Woodlands Park Road is one of the streets of London in the SE10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Hardy This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bill’s Restaurant Limited This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Goddard’s at Greenwich This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Green Pea This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Greenwich Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Greenwich Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mitre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Brewery This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Olivers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pelton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Plume of Feathers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Royal Standard P.H This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Star and Garter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Gipsy Moth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Yacht Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Up The Creek This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Greenwich

Greenwich is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames.

Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was demolished to be replaced by the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained a military education establishment until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle established on Maze Hill in 1717, next to the park. From the Georgian period estates of houses were constructed above the town centre. The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.

Greenwich railway station opened on 24 December 1838 - one of the earliest stations in the London area. The Docklands Light Railway (DLR) was extended to Lewisham via Greenwich on 20 November 1999, the new platforms lying immediately to the south of the main-line station. At the eastern end, the DLR heads underground through the tunnel through Cutty Sark and under the River Thames.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
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Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
Crooms Hill (1937)
TUM image id: 1657290361
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Gloucester Circus (1960s)
TUM image id: 1657291606
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tram in Greenwich Church Street.
TUM image id: 1657290753
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
This image of Pluto, released on 23 July 2015, clearly shows the now familiar heart-shaped region nicknamed Tombaugh Regio. The photo is actually a combination of observations from the main camera on New Horizons (called LORRI) and the probe’s visible/infrared imager (known as Ralph) which provided data for the colours in the view. The enhanced colours allow scientists to identify differences in the composition and texture of Pluto’s surface, according to a NASA image description.
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Saturn and its rings, as seen from above the planet by the Cassini spacecraft
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The establishment of a Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London was proposed in 1674 by Sir Jonas Moore who, in his role as Surveyor-General of the Ordnance, persuaded King Charles II to create the observatory, with John Flamsteed installed as its director. Royal Observatory, Greenwich (ROG) played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and because the Prime Meridian passes through it, it gave its name to Greenwich Mean Time, the precursor to today’s Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The ROG has the IAU observatory code of 000, the first in the list.
Credit: Kjetil Bjørnsrud
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The Statue of Yuri Gagarin in Greenwich, London, is a zinc statue depicting the cosmonaut wearing a spacesuit and standing on top of a globe.
Credit: Anatoly Novikov
Licence:


Crooms Hill (1937)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Gloucester Circus (1960s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tram in Greenwich Church Street.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Maze Hill SE10
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Royal Standard (still) stands at the corner of Pelton Road and Christchurch Way in Greenwich.
Old London postcard
Licence:


Looking up Saunder’s Ness Road from approximately the boundary between Empire Wharf and Storer’s Wharf (1930s)
Credit: Isle of Dogs – Past Life, Past Lives
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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