Portland Road, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between 1855 and now

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Road · Notting Hill · W11 ·
MAY
10
2021

Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other.

House prices in desirable areas of British cities have rocketed, changing some inner-city communities beyond recognition through the process of "super-gentrification". Across some areas of the UK, streets that once housed poor people are now beyond the means of all but the well-off.

The path to gentrification is clear when modern streets are compared with maps created by the Victorian social researcher Charles Booth a century ago. It’s particularly obvious in Portland Road in London’s Notting Hill.

There are the multi-million pound houses, three-stories high, without so much as a curtain out of place. There’s a beauty spa, a wine bar and a gallery selling artworks that cost tens of thousands of pounds. It’s hard to believe it used to be one of the worst slums in London.

The houses on Portland Road were built in the 1850s on waste land between the downmarket Norland estate, home to the squalid piggeries and potteries, and the fancy new Ladbroke Estate, which became Notting Hill.

Maps created by Booth in 1899 show how two-thirds of the residents of Portland Road were classified as poor.

By the time Booth’s map was updated in 1929, the residents towards the northern end of Portland Road had moved into a different category: "Degraded and semi-criminal".
Houses slipped into multiple occupation and became run down, with shared toilets and no bathrooms.

The abolition of rent control in 1957 was meant to encourage investment in property. But it led to ruthless landlords - like the infamous Peter Rachman - trying to cash in on the now lucrative housing market by bullying tenants into leaving. It triggered the gentrification of Portland Road and was the beginning of the end of the street’s working class community.

New ’super-gentrifiers’ are different to the pioneer gentrifiers, who sent their children to the local primary school and engaged with the existing community.

The one part of Portland Road that was never truly gentrified is the northern end, where social housing replaced run-down tenement buildings that had housed brewery workers.

Built in the 1930s, Winterbourne House and Nottingwood House are just a few hundred yards from properties worth millions of pounds. Flats cost an average of £340,000, compared with the average price for a house at the southern end of Portland Road of £3.5m. (2012)

A deprivation map produced by Kensington & Chelsea Borough Council in 2007 showed that while some of the top earners in the country live in the southern and central parts of Portland Road, some of the lowest 5% live at the north end.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Bangor Street (1911) Bangor Street was a street in Notting Dale which disappeared after the Second World War.
Bangor Street (turn of 20th century) The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner of Bangor Street that this photo was taken from.
Corner of Bangor Street and Sirdar Road The location became the Dolphin Pub.
Counters Creek sewer The effluent society
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kenilworth Castle The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mary Place Workhouse Notting Dale Workhouse stood on the site of what is now Avondale Park Gardens,
Notting Dale From Pigs and bricks to Posh and Becks...
St John’s Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Addison Avenue, W11 Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North.
Addison Place, W11 In the nineteenth century, Addison Place was known by two names - Phoenix Place and Crescent Mews East.
Ansleigh Place, W11 Ansleigh Place is an ex mews to the west of Notting Dale.
Aubrey Road, W8 Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s.
Avondale Park Gardens, W11 Avondale Park Gardens, unlike other roads in the area, was developed in the 1920s when it was laid out on the former workhouse site.
Avondale Park Road, W11 Avondale Park Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Bangor Street, W11 Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court.
Barandon Street, W11 Barandon Street connected Lancaster Road with Latimer Road station.
Bomore Road, W11 Bomore Road survived post-war redevelopment with a slight change in alignment.
Boxmoor Street, W11 Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11 Boyne Terrace Mews is a mews in Notting Hill, London W11.
Campden Hill Square, W8 Campden Hill Square is a residential square consisting of large family houses.
Clarendon Cross, W11 Clarendon Cross is a street in Notting Hill.
Clarendon Road, W11 Clarendon Road is one of the W11’s longest streets, running from Holland Park Avenue in the south to Dulford Street in the north.
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Freston Road, W11 The southern end of Freston Road stretches over into the W11 postcode.
Gorham Place, W11 Gorham Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Grenfell Road, W11 Grenfell Road follows the line of an old road: St Clement’s Road.
Heathfield Street, W11 Heathfield Street was a side turning off of Portland Road.
Hesketh Place, W11 Hesketh Place runs between Walmer Road and Avondale Park Road.
Hippodrome Mews, W11 Hippodrome Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Hippodrome Place, W11 Hippodrome Place was named after a lost racecourse of London.
Holland Park Avenue, W11 Holland Park Avenue is one of London’s most ancient thoroughfares.
Holland Park Mews, W11 Holland Park Mews runs between the two branches of the road known as Holland Park.
Holland Park Terrace, W11 Holland Park Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Park, W11 The roads known as Holland Park consist of three main branches.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Kensington.
Hume Road, W11 Hume Road ran from Norland Gardens to Norland Road.
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Hurstway Walk, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Kenilworth Street, W11 Kenilworth Street was demolished just after the Second World War.
Kenley Street, W11 Kenley Street, W11 was originally William Street before it disappeared.
Kenley Walk, W11 Kenley Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kingsdale Gardens, W11 Kingsdale Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Gardens, W11 Ladbroke Gardens runs between Ladbroke Grove and Kensington Park Road.
Ladbroke Grove, W11 Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles.
Lansdowne Mews, W11 Lansdowne Mews is a cul-de-sac in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Rise, W11 Lansdowne Rise, W11 was originally called Montpelier Road.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Mary Place, W11 Mary Place connects Walmer Road with Sirdar Road.
Mortimer Square, W11 Mortimer Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Place, W11 Norland Place began its life as Norland Stables.
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Square, W11 Norland Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Portland Gate, W11 Portland Gate is a road in the SW7 postcode area
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street.
Prince’s Yard, W11 This is a small cul-de-sac off of Princes Road.
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road.
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road.
Queensdale Road, W11 Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses.
Queensdale Walk, W11 Queensdale Walk is a small cul-de-sac with 2-storey cottages running south off Queensdale Road.
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Rosmead Road, W11 Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road.
Royal Crescent Mews, W11 Royal Crescent Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Royal Crescent, W11 The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park.
Runcorn Place, W11 Runcorn Place was once Thomas Place, and before even that ’The Mews’.
Saunders Grove, W11 Saunders Grove ran east from Norland Gardens.
Sirdar Road, W11 Sirdar Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Ann’s Road, W11 St Ann’s Road, along with St Ann’s Villas, runs north from Royal Crescent.
St Ann’s Villas, W11 St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road.
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Stoneleigh Place, W11 Stoneleigh Place, formerly called Abbey Road, was built across a brickfield in Notting Dale.
Stoneleigh Street, W11 Stoneleigh Street runs between Treadgold Street and Stoneleigh Place.
Swanscombe House, W11 Residential block
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Testerton Walk, W11 Testerton Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Threshers Place, W11 Threshers Place is a quiet street with a long story.
Treadgold Street, W11 Treadgold Street is part of the Avondale Park Gardens Conservation Area.
Walmer Road, W11 Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.
Whitchurch Road, W11 Whitchurch Road connects Bramley Road with Treadgold Street.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road.

NEARBY PUBS
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kenilworth Castle The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Ladbroke Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Latimer Arms The Latimer Arms was situated at 79 Norland Road.
Portobello Gold This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Stewart Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Academy This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.
The Mitre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Oxford The Oxford was located at 90-92 Portobello Road.


Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Children of Ruston Close
TUM image id: 1545251090
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Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
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Bassett Road, W10
TUM image id: 1563717408
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Oxford Gardens, W10
Old London postcard
TUM image id: 1563716750
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In the neighbourhood...

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Children of Ruston Close
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The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner of Bangor Street, W11 that this photo was taken from. Bangor Street disappeared from the streetscene of Notting Dale after the Second World War.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother, with Lady Petrie, opening Henry Dickens Court, W11 (1953) The Queen Mother is greeted by large crowds and is accompanied by Lady Petrie, Mayor of Kensington. Henry Dickens Court was built by the Council on a bomb site as part of the borough’s post war redevelopment plan. It was named after Henry Dickens, grandson of Charles Dickens, an Alderman on the Council and an active advocate of municipal housing.
Credit: Kensington Libraries
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The Tile Kiln, Notting Dale (1824)
Credit: Florence Gladstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Corner of Bangor Street and Sirdar Road, W11 (1911) This became the Dolphin Pub. The location was demolished to make way for the Henry Dickens Estate.
Credit: London City Mission magazine
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Hippodrome, about 1840, showing St John’s Hill in the background.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Guy Fawkes and friends in Addison Avenue, W11 (around 1960)
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Addison Place
Credit: Google Maps
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Addison Road, W14 (1909) Addison Road takes its name from the essayist Joseph Addison who lived nearby at Holland House.
Old London postcard
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