Westbourne Grove, W2

Road in/near Bayswater, existing between 1839 and now

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(51.51534 -0.19251, 51.515 -0.192) 
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Road · Bayswater · W2 ·
October
28
2020

Westbourne Grove began its existence as a footpath.

The cutting of the Great Western Railway line across the middle of Westbourne Green was begun in 1836. This caused a slight northward realignment of Harrow Road east of its junction with Black Lion Lane and the turnpike gate here was moved.

The railway obstructed the Paddington green end of a footpath called Bishop’s Walk. This was upgraded to became Bishop’s Road and a part extended westwards as Westbourne Grove.

Houses had been built in Westbourne Grove by 1842, when the Lock hospital, giving its name to the Lock Bridge where Harrow Road crossed the canal, stood opposite Westbourne Manor House to the north.


Main source: A History of the County of Middlesex | British History Online
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ’I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ’luxury’.

’When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

’When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play - and me of sorts - being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ’6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Duke of Cornwall The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Queen’s Cinema This cinema was situated at the top of Queensway, on the corner of Bishop's Bridge Road.
Red Lion Bridge Harrow Road once spanned the River Westbourne at this point.
Royal Oak Royal Oak is a station on the Hammersmith and City Line, between Westbourne Park and Paddington stations, and is the least used station on the Hammersmith and City line.
Westbourne House Two hundred years ago, the biggest house hereabouts...
Westbourne Lodge Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.
Whiteley’s Whiteley’s, pictured here in the 1920s, was designated a Grade II Listed Building in 1970.

NEARBY STREETS
Aldridge Court, W11 Aldridge Court is in Aldridge Road Villas.
Aldridge Road Villas, W11 Aldridge Road Villas is a surviving fragment of mid-Victorian residential development.
Alexander Mews, W2 Alexander Mews is a street in Paddington.
Alexander Street, W2 Alexander Street was built in 1853 by Alexander Hall of Watergate House, Sussex.
Artesian Road, W11 Artesian Road lies just over the boundary into Paddington from Notting Hill.
Arthur Court, W2 Arthur Court is at the north-west end of Queensway.
Bark Place, W2 This is a street in the W2 postcode area
Bridstow Place, W2 Bridstow Place is a street in Paddington.
Burdett Mews, W2 Burdett Mews is a street in Paddington.
Caradoc Close, W2 Caradoc Close is a street in Paddington.
Caroline Place, W2 Caroline Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
Celbridge Mews, W2 Celbridge Mews is a street in Paddington.
Cervantes Court, W2 Cervantes Court is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Corner, W2 Chepstow Corner is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Chepstow Place, W2 Chepstow Place runs from the junction of Westbourne Grove and Pembridge Villas in the north to Pembridge Square in the south.
Chepstow Road, W2 Chepstow Road is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Villas, W11 Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.
Courtnell Street, W2 Courtnell Street is a street in Paddington.
Dartmouth Close, W11 Dartmouth Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Dawson Place, W2 Dawson Place is a street in Paddington.
Elsie Lane Court, W2 This is a street in the W2 postcode area
Evesham House, W2 Residential block
Garway Road, W2 Garway Road is a street in Paddington.
Gloucester Gardens, W2 Gloucester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Hatherley Court, W2 Hatherley Court is a 1930s block.
Hatherley Grove, W2 Hatherley Grove is a street in Paddington.
Hereford Road, W2 Hereford Road was planned as a road of detached villas.
Ilchester Gardens, W2 Ilchester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Inverness Mews, W2 Inverness Mews is a street in Paddington.
Inverness Place, W2 Inverness Place is a street in Paddington.
Inverness Terrace, W2 Inverness Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Kensington Gardens Square, W2 Kensington Gardens Square is a street in Paddington.
Keyham House, W2 The twenty-storey Keyham House is on Westbourne Park Road.
Kildare Terrace, W2 Kildare Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Lambton Place, W11 Lambton Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Mews North, W11 Ledbury Mews North is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Mews West, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Ledbury Road, W2 Ledbury Road is a street in Paddington.
Leinster Square, W2 Leinster Square, along with Prince’s Square, was begun in 1856 and finished in 1864
Monmouth Road, W2 Monmouth Road contained cottages and semi-detached villas by 1846
Moorhouse Road, W2 Moorhouse Road is a street in Paddington.
Moscow Place, W2 Moscow Place is a street in Paddington.
Moscow Road, W2 Moscow Road is a street in Paddington.
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road was formerly Norfolk Road.
Newton Mews, W2 Newton Mews is shown on the 1900 map.
Newton Road, W2 William Kinnaird Jenkins laid out Newton Road in 1846.
Northumberland Place, W2 Northumberland Place is a street in Paddington.
Olympia Mews, W2 Olympia Mews is a street in Paddington.
Orsett Mews, W2 Orsett Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Place, W2 Pembridge Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Place, W2 Pembridge Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
Pembridge Square, W2 Pembridge Square was developed between 1856 and 1864.
Pembridge Villas, W11 Pembridge Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembroke House, W2 Residential block
Pencombe Mews, W11 Pencombe Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pickering Mews, W2 Pickering Mews is a street in Paddington.
Pickering Place, W2 Pickering Place eventually became the northern section of Queensway.
Pickering Terrace, W2 Pickering Terrace was later part of Porchester Road.
Poplar Place, W2 Poplar Place is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Gardens Mews, W2 Porchester Gardens Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Porchester Gardens, W2 Porchester Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Road, W2 Porchester Road has existed under a series of names since at least the 1750s.
Porchester Square, W2 Begun in 1850 and completed between 1855 and 1858, Porchester Square was one of the last areas of Bayswater to be built.
Porchester Terrace North, W2 Porchester Terrace North is a road in the W2 postcode area
Prince’s Square, W2 This is a street in the W2 postcode area
Princes Mews, W2 Princes Mews is a street in Paddington.
Princes Square, W2 Princes Square is a street in Paddington.
Princess Court, W2 Princess Court is a street in Paddington.
Queens Court, W2 Queens Court is a street in Paddington.
Queens Mews, W2 Queens Mews is a street in Paddington.
Queensborough Passage, W2 Queensborough Passage is a road in the W2 postcode area
Queensborough Studios, W2 Queensborough Studios is a road in the W2 postcode area
Queensborough Terrace, W2 Queensborough Terrace was built by the grandson of John Aldridge in the 1860s on part of the Aldridge lands.
Ralph Court, W2 Ralph Court backed Peter’s Court in Porchester Road.
Ranelagh Bridge, W2 Ranelagh Bridge is a road in the W2 postcode area
Redan House, W2 Residential block
Redan Place, W2 Redan Place is a street in Paddington.
Rede Place, W2 Rede Place is a street in Paddington.
Rosehart Mews, W11 Rosehart Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Salem Road, W2 Salem Road is a street in Paddington.
Shottsford, W2 Shottsford is one of the buildings of the Wessex Gardens Estate.
Shrewsbury Road, W2 Shrewsbury Road is a street in Paddington.
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road.
St Petersburgh Mews, W2 St Petersburgh Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
St Stephens Gardens, W2 St Stephens Gardens is a street in Paddington.
St Stephens Mews, W2 St Stephens Mews is a street in Paddington.
St Stephen’s Gardens, W2 St Stephen’s Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Sutherland Place, W2 Sutherland Place is a street in Paddington.
Swanleys, W2 Swanleys was built east of St Stephen’s Church in 1978.
Talbot Road, W2 Talbot Road straddles the W2/W11 postcodes.
The Colonnades, W2 The Colonnades is in Porchester Square.
The Whiteleys Centre, W2 The Whiteleys Centre is the former site of the Whiteleys department store.
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Gardens, W2 Westbourne Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 Westbourne Grove Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove Terrace, W2 Runs north from Westbourne Grove.
Westbourne Grove, W11 Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill.
Westbourne Park Road, W11 Westbourne Park Road runs between Notting Hill and the Paddington area.
Westbourne Park Road, W2 Houses at the Paddington end of Westbourne Park Road date from the 1850s.
Westbourne Park Villas, W2 Westbourne Park Villas is a street in Paddington.
Westbury House, W11 Westbury House was built on the corner of Westbourne Park Road and Aldridge Road Villas in 1965.
Windsor Court, W2 Windsor Court is a street in Paddington.

NEARBY PUBS
Beach Blanket Babylon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duke of Cornwall The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Royal Oak The Royal Oak pub gave its name to the nearby station.
The Cock & Bottle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Walmer Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Bayswater

Bayswater is one of London's most cosmopolitan areas - also one of London's biggest concentration of hotels.

Notably, there is a significant Arab population, a large number of Americans, a substantial Greek community attracted by London's Greek Orthodox Cathedral and the area is also a centre of London's Brazilian community.

Architecturally, the biggest part of the area is made up of Victorian mansion blocks, mostly, although not exclusively, divided up into flats. There are also purpose built apartment blocks dating from the inter-war period as well as more recent developments, and a there is large Council Estate, the 800 flat Hallfield Estate, designed by Sir Denys Lasdun and now largely sold off. There are some garden squares in the area.

Queensway and Westbourne Grove are busy High Streets, with a very large number of ethnic restaurants.

Bayswater tube station lies between Notting Hill Gate and Paddington.

The station was opened 1 October 1868, just 5 years after the London Underground started. It was renamed several times: to Bayswater (Queen's Road) & Westbourne Grove in 1923, to Bayswater (Queen's Road) in 1933.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Great Western Road (1959)
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Powis Square west side (1900s).
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In the neighbourhood...

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Notting Hill
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This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding at Westbourne Lodge, Paddington of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests. During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Mrs Siddons house at Westbourne Green c. 1800
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The Royal Oak pub in Bayswater gave its name to the nearby station
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Bourne Terrace - taken from Torquay Street. On the corner of Bourne Terrace is Saws Ltd at number 264 along with various blocks which no longer exist.
Credit: Bernard Selwwyn
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Cirencester Street, W2 The streets length was curtailed when the Warwick Estate was built.
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Lord Hills Road at the junction with Senior Street
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Customers of the Great Western pub, 57 Hampden Street, Paddington (c.1915). Everybody sports a button-hole, suggesting some sort of event.
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