William IV Street, WC2R

Road in/near Charing Cross, existing between the 1860s and now

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(51.5095 -0.12526, 51.509 -0.125) 
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Road · Charing Cross · WC2R ·
JANUARY
18
2018

William IV Street runs from Charing Cross Road to the Strand.

Its Strand end has become closed to traffic.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
101 Strand, WC2R This shop was one of the first in London to have gas lighting fitted.
Ackermann’s Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Charing Cross Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
Embankment Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including, indeed, ’Embankment’.
Garrick Yard Garrick Yard, together with the more familiar Garrick Street to the northeast of here, both took their names from the Garrick Club which commemorates the famous 18th century actor, David Garrick.
Hungerford Bridge Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.
Hungerford Stairs The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.
Leicester Square Leicester Square, while indeed a square, is also the name for a tube station.
Northumberland House Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, the Dukes of Northumberland.
Queen’s Theatre The Queen’s Theatre is located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street.
Royal Society The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine.
Shipley’s Drawing School 101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.
The Adelphi The Adelphi is a small district surrounding the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street.
Wyld’s Great Globe Wyld’s Great Globe was an attraction situated in Leicester Square between 1851 and 1862.

NEARBY STREETS
Adam Street, WC2N Adam Street is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Adelaide Street, WC2R Adelaide Street was named for Queen Adelaide, Consort to King William IV.
Adelphi Terrace, WC2N Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Agar Street, WC2N Agar Street is named after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough
Banbury Court, WC2E Banbury Court is named for Nicholas Knollys, 3rd Earl of Banbury, who owned a house here called Banbury House.
Bear Street, WC2H Bear Street is a streetname with two possible derivations.
Bedford Chambers, WC2E Bedford Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Street, WC2E Bedford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Street, WC2R Bedford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Bedfordbury, WC2N Bedfordbury is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Blackmoor Street, WC2B Blackmoor Street was in the Drury Lane slum.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bow Street, WC2E Bow Street was first developed by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford in 1633.
Brydges Place, WC2N Brydges Place replaced Taylor’s Buildings in 1904 when the Colloseum was built.
Buckingham Street, WC2N Buckingham Street is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Burleigh Street, WC2R Burleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Cambridge Circus, WC2H Cambridge Circus is the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road.
Cannon Street, WC2N Cannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Carlton House Terrace, SW1Y Carlton House Terrace consists of a pair of terraces - white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St James’s Park.
Carriage Hall, WC2E Carriage Hall is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Carting Lane, WC2R Carting Lane is thought to be named after the carts that brought goods to and from the wharf formerly located here.
Catherine Street, WC2B Catherine Street runs from Russell Street in the north to Aldwych in the south.
Cecil Court, WC2N Cecil Court is a pedestrian street with Victorian shop-frontages.
Central Arcade, WC2E Central Arcade is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Chandos Place, WC2R Chandos Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Charing Cross Mansions, WC2H Charing Cross Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Charing Cross Road, WC2H Charing Cross Road is a street running immediately north of St Martin-in-the-Fields to St Giles Circus.
Charing Cross, SW1A Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma.
Ching Court, WC2H Ching Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Clare Market, WC2E This is a street in the WC2E postcode area
Cockspur Street, SW1A Cockspur Street is possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights.
Covent Garden, WC2E Covent Garden, is the name of a district, but also the name of the central square which formerly hosted a fruit-and-vegetable market.
Coventry Street, W1D Coventry Street is a short street connecting Piccadilly Circus to Leicester Square. On the London Monopoly board, it was named after the politician Henry Coventry, secretary of state to Charles II.
Cranbourn Street, WC2H Cranbourne Street was named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset.
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Duncannon Street, WC2N Duncannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Durham House Street, WC2N Durham House Street was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in medieval times.
Embankment Place, WC2N Embankment Place runs from Villiers Street, under a railway arch, on to Northumberland Avenue.
Exeter Street, WC2R Exeter Street is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Festival Pier, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Floral Court, WC2E Floral Court is a location in London.
Floral Street, WC2E Floral Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Garrick Street, WC2N Garrick Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Gerrard Place, W1D Gerrard Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gerrard Street, W1D Gerrard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Golden Jubilee Bridge, WC2N Golden Jubilee Bridge is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Great Newport Street, WC2H Great Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Hanover Place, WC2E Hanover Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Heathcock Court, WC2R Heathcock Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Henrietta Street, WC2E Henrietta Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron.
Hop Gardens, WC2N Hop Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Horse and Dolphin Yard, W1D Horse and Dolphin Yard once lay behind the Horse and Dolphin Inn.
Hungerford House, WC2N Residential block
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor.
Ivybridge Lane, WC2N Ivybridge Lane is named after a former ivy-covered bridge.
James Street, WC2E James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
John Adam Street, WC2N John Adam Street is named after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s.
Jubilee Market, WC2E Jubilee Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
King Street, WC2E King Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Kinnaird House is a block on Pall Mall.
Lancaster Place, WC2R Lancaster Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Court, WC2E Langley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Street, WC2H Langley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Leicester Place, WC2H Leicester Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Leicester Square, WC2H Leicester Square is a central tourist attraction of London.
Leicester Street, WC2H Leicester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Lisle Street, WC2H Lisle Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Litchfield Street, WC2H Litchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Newport Street, WC2H Little Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Long Acre, WC2E Long Acre is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Maiden Lane, WC2E Maiden Lane runs from Bedford Street in the west to Southampton Street in the east.
Maple Leaf Walk, WC2R Maple Leaf Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
May’s Court, WC2N May’s Court is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Meard Street, W1D John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Montreal Place, WC2R Montreal Place is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Moor Street, W1D Moor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
New Row, WC2E New Row is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
New Zealand House, SW1Y New Zealand House is a block on Haymarket
Newport Court, WC2H Newport Court was laid out approximately on the site of the courtyard of Newport House.
Newport Place, W1D Newport Place was named after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on Newport Street in the 17th century.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century.
Northumberland Avenue, SW1A Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east.
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N The part of Northumberland Avenue nearest to Trafalgar Square lies in the SW1 rather than WC2 postcode.
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland.
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street gets its name from William III, Prince of Orange - the reigning king when the street was built.
Oxendon Street, W1D Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby.
Pall Mall East, SW1A Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square.
Panton Street, W1D Panton Street was named after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century.
Robert Street, WC2N Robert Street is named after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s.
Romilly Street, W1D Romilly Street is a small street that runs behind Shaftesbury Avenue and takes its name from lawyer Samuel Romilly.
Rose Street, WC2N Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade was originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash.
Rupert Court, W1D Rupert Court was named for Prince Rupert of the Rhine, the First Lord of the Admiralty when the court was built in 1676.
Rupert Street, W1D Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I.
Russell Chambers, WC2E Russell Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Russell Street, WC2E Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Russell Street, WC2E Russell Street is a road in the WC2E postcode area
Savoy Court, WC2R Savoy Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Hill, WC2R Savoy Hill is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor.
Savoy Place, WC2N Savoy Place is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor - taking its name from Peter II, Count of Savoy.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Way, WC2R Savoy Way is located on the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245.
Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.
Slingsby Place, WC2E Slingsby Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street - named for Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton and landowner.
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Spring Gardens, WC2N Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace.
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street was named after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner.
St Martins Court, WC2H St Martins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane runs up to Seven Dials from St Martin’s-in-the-Fields.
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martin’s Place is a short stretch connecting Trafalgar Square to the bottom of Charing Cross Road.
St Martins Street, WC2H St Martins Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Strand Underpass, WC2R Strand Underpass is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Strand, WC2E Strand (or the Strand) runs just over 3⁄4 mile from Trafalgar Square eastwards to Temple Bar, where the road becomes Fleet Street inside the City of London.
Strand, WC2E Strand, as it nears the Aldwych, is home to many London theatres.
Strand, WC2N Strand begins its journey east at Trafalgar Square.
Strand, WC2R Strand is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place.
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site.
Tavistock Street, WC2B Tavistock Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Tavistock Street, WC2R Tavistock Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Arches, WC2N The Arches is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court, WC2R The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court is a road in the WC2R postcode area
The Market Piazza, WC2E The Market Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market The Piazza, WC2E The Market The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market, WC2E The Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Piazza, WC2E The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Tower Court, WC2H Tower Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tower Street, WC2H Tower Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Trafalgar Square, WC2N Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Victoria Embankment Gardens, WC2N Victoria Embankment Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Victoria Embankment, WC2N Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Wardour Street, W1D The W1D part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown.
Warwick House Street, SW1A Warwick House Street formerly approached Warwick House, built in the 17th century for Sir Philip Warwick.
Watergate Walk, WC2N Watergate Walk is named after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House.
Waterloo Place, SW1Y Waterloo Place, an extension of Regent Street, is awash with statues and monuments that honour heroes of the British Empire.
Wellington Street, WC2E Wellington Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Wellington Terrace, WC2E Wellington Terrace is a street in Paddington.
West Street, WC2H West Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Whitcomb Street, WC2H Whitcomb Street - named after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer.
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
York Buildings, WC2N York Buildings marks a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich.
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Ape and Bird This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clock House The Coach & Horses is a pub on the corner of Romilly Street and Greek Street.
Comptons Of Soho This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Golden Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Ambassadors Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
O’Neills This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Of Wales Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Martin’s Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blue Posts This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sussex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Greyhounds This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Two Brewers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Waxy O’Connors This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Waxy’s Little Sister This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Charing Cross

Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square

Charing Cross gives its name to several local landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station and is named after the now demolished Eleanor cross that stood there, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. It was where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

It was one of twelve places where Eleanor’s coffin rested overnight during the funeral procession from Lincolnshire to her final resting-place at Westminster. At each of these, Edward erected an Eleanor cross, of which only three now remain.

The original site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I. A Victorian replacement, in different style from the original, was later erected a short distance to the east outside the railway station.

Formerly, until 1931, Charing Cross also referred to the part of what is now Whitehall lying between Great Scotland Yard and Trafalgar Square. At least one property retains a Charing Cross postal address: Drummonds Bank, on the corner of Whitehall and The Mall, which is designated 49 Charing Cross (not to be confused with the separate Charing Cross Road).

Since the second half of the 18th century, Charing Cross has been seen by some as the exact centre of London, being the main point used for measuring distances from London.

The railway station opened in 1864, fronted on the Strand with the Charing Cross Hotel. The original station building was built on the site of the Hungerford Market by the South Eastern Railway, designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, with a single span wrought iron roof arching over the six platforms on its relatively cramped site.

Charing Cross tube station has entrances located in Trafalgar Square and The Strand. The station is served by the Northern and Bakerloo lines, originally separate tube stations called Strand and Trafalgar Square, and provides an interchange with the National Rail network. The station was served by the Jubilee Line between 1979 and 1999, acting as the southern terminus of the line during that period.



LOCAL PHOTOS
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William Shakespeare
TUM image id: 1509551019
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
TUM image id: 1556885410
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
TUM image id: 1557403389
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
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In the neighbourhood...

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Theatreland, Shaftesbury Avenue
Credit: IG/my.wandering.journey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


William Shakespeare
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Trafalgar Square was a former station on the Bakerloo Line before it combined with Strand station on the Northern Line to become the new Charing Cross underground station.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Strand stretches along the River Thames between Trafalgar Square and Aldwych
Credit: The Underground Map
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Buses outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. Date of photo unknown
Credit: Stockholm Transport Museum
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Royal Opera House, Bow Street frontage, with the statue of Dame Ninette de Valois in the foreground
Credit: Russ London
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London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sectional view of Wyld’s Great Globe, which stood in Leicester Square, London 1851–62
Credit: Illustrated London News
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