Tate Modern

Gallery in/near South Bank, existing between the 2000s and now

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Gallery · South Bank · ·
JUNE
1
2014

Tate Modern is the most-visited modern art gallery in the world, with around 4.7 million visitors per year.

Tate Modern is Britain's national gallery of international modern art and forms part of the Tate group (together with Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool, Tate St Ives and Tate Online). It is based in the former Bankside Power Station, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Tate holds the national collection of British art from 1900 to the present day and international modern and contemporary art.

The galleries are housed in the former Bankside Power Station, which was originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, the architect of Battersea Power Station, and built in two stages between 1947 and 1963. The power station closed in 1981. In 1992 The Tate Gallery at the British National Art Museum proposed a competition to build a new building for modern art. The purpose for the new building would help with the ever-expanding collection on modern and contemporary art. In 1995 it was announced that Herzog & de Meuron had won the competition with their simple design. The architects decided to reinvent the current building instead of demolishing it. The Tate modern is an example of adaptive reuse, the process of finding new life in old buildings. The building itself still resembles the 20th century factory in style from the outside and that is reflected on the inside by the taupe walls, steel girders and concrete floors. The façade of the building is made out of 4.2 million bricks that are separated by groups of thin vertical windows that help create a dramatic light inside. The history of the site as well as information about the conversion was the basis for a 2008 documentary Architects Herzog and de Meuron: Alchemy of Building & Tate Modern. This challenging conversion work was carried by Carillion. The southern third of the building was retained by the French power company EDF Energy as an electrical substation (in 2006, the company released half of this holding).

Tate Modern currently has seven floors, originally numbered 1 to 7, they were renumbered 0 to 6 in 2012. Levels 0 to 4 contain gallery space.

The main collection displays consist of four wings each taking up approximately half a complete floor of the main building. Each wing has a named theme or subject. Within each wing there are some rooms that change periodically showing different works in keeping with the overall theme or subject of the wing.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Holy Trinity the Less Holy Trinity the Less was a parish church, destroyed in the Great Fire of London.
St James Garlickhythe James Garlickhythe is a Church of England parish church in Vintry ward of the City of London, nicknamed "˜Wren’s lantern" owing to its profusion of windows.
St John the Evangelist Friday Street St John the Evangelist Friday Street was a church in Bread Street Ward of the City of London.
St Mary Mounthaw St Mary Mounthaw or Mounthaut was a parish church in Old Fish Street Hill.
St Mary Somerset St. Mary Somerset was a church in the City of London first recorded in the twelfth century. Destroyed in the Great Fire, it was one of the 51 churches rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren.
St Michael Paternoster Royal St Michael Paternoster Royal is a church in the City of London.
St Michael Queenhithe St. Michael Queenhithe was a church in the City of London located in what is now Upper Thames Street.
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London.
St Thomas the Apostle St Thomas the Apostle was a parish church in Knightrider Street in the City of London.
Walbrook Wharf Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.

NEARBY STREETS
America Street, SE1 America Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 Anchor Terrace is a large symmetrical building on the east side of Southwark Bridge Road, situated very close to the River Thames.
Bank End, SE1 Bank End is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bankside Lofts, SE1 Bankside Lofts is a block in Southwark.
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bear Lane, SE1 Bear Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bell Wharf Lane, EC4R Bell Wharf Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Benbow House, SE1 Benbow House is a block on New Globe Walk
Blackfriars Bridge, EC4V Blackfriars Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Bridge, SE1 Blackfriars Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Lane, EC4V Blackfriars Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Underpass, EC4V Blackfriars Underpass is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Bridge Walk, EC4V Bridge Walk is a road in the SE8 postcode area
Brinton Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Broken Wharf, EC4V Broken Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Burrell Street, SE1 Burrell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cannon Bridge, EC4R Cannon Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Canvey Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardinal Cap Alley, SE1 Cardinal Cap Alley is an alley in Bankside.
Chancel Street, SE1 Chancel Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Clink Street, SE1 Clink Street is best known as the historic location of the Clink Prison.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cloak Lane, EC4N Cloak Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
College Hill, EC4R College Hill is named after Sir Richard Whittington’s college, set up here in the early 1400s.
College Street, EC4R College Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Colombo Street, SE1 Colombo Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Columbo House, SE1 Columbo House is a block on Blackfriars Road.
Cousin Lane, EC4R Cousin Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Dolben Street, SE1 Dolben Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dorset House 27-45, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Dowgate Hill, EC4R Dowgate Hill is a continuation of Walbrook along the west side of Cannon Street Station, leading to Dowgate Dock.
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Europoint House, SW8 Europoint House is a location in London.
Ewer Street, SE1 Ewer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Farringdon Road, EC4V Farringdon Road is a road in the EC4P postcode area
Farringdon Road, EC4V Farringdon Road is a road in the EC4A postcode area
Gambia Street, SE1 Gambia Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Garlick Hill, EC4N Garlick Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Grande Vitesse Industrial Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Guildford Street, SE1 Great Guildford Street runs north-south in Southwark.
Great St Thomas Apostle, EC4R Great St Thomas A postle, a rather odd streetname, between Garlick Hill and Queen Street.
Great St Thomas, EC4R Great St Thomas is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Hatfields, SE1 Hatfields is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
High Timber Street, EC4V High Timber Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Holland Street, SE1 Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane.
Hopton Street, SE1 Hopton Street was known as Green Walk until the late nineteenth century.
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Invicta Plaza, SE1 Invicta Plaza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Isabella Street, SE1 Isabella Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Joan Street, SE1 Joan Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
John Carpenter Street, EC4Y John Carpenter was town clerk of the City of London in the fifteenth century, and founder of the City of London School.
Junction Approach, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Lambeth Hill, EC4V Lambeth Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Lavington Street, SE1 Lavington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Little Trinity Lane, EC4V Little Trinity Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Meymott Street, SE1 Meymott Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Millennium Bridge, EC4V Millennium Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Milroy Walk, SE1 Milroy Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
New Court, EC4V New Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Nicholson Street, SE1 Nicholson Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Oystergate Walk, SE1 Oystergate Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Paris Garden, SE1 Paris Garden is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Park Street, SE1 Park Street runs one block south of Bankside.
Paul’s Walk, EC4V Paul’s Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Peter’s Hill, EC4V Peter’s Hill is the northern access to the Millennium Bridge.
Platts Lane, WC1R Platts Lane is a location in London.
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Street, SE1 Price’s Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Puddle Dock, EC4V Puddle Dock is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Queen St Place, EC4R Queen St Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Queen Street Place, EC4R Queen Street Place is a location in London.
Queen Street, EC4R Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street and Cheapside.
Queen Victoria Street, EC4V Queen Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Queen Victoria Street, EC4V Queen Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Queenhithe, EC4V Queenhithe is a small and ancient ward of the City of London, situated by the River Thames and a minor street.
Redcross Way, SE1 Redcross Way was previously called Red Cross Street.
Rennie Street, SE1 Rennie Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Robinson Road, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rochester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Scoresby Street, SE1 Scoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Soho Wharf, SE1 Soho Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Solomon Way, E1 Solomon Way is a location in London.
Southwalk Street, SE1 Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, EC4V Southwark Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
Southwark Street, SE1 Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east.
Stew Lane, EC4V Stew Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Stoney Street, SE1 Stoney Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sumner Street, SE1 Sumner Street runs from Great Guildford Street to Southwark Bridge Road.
Tallis House 2 Tallis Street, EC4Y Tallis House 2 Tallis Street is a location in London.
Thames Reach, SE28 Thames Reach is a location in London.
The Blue Fin Building, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Hop Exchange, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Three Barrels Walk, EC4V Three Barrels Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Trig Lane, EC4V A street within the EC4V postcode
Upper Thames Street, EC4V Upper Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
White Lion Hill, EC4V White Lion Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Zoar Street, SE1 Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara.

NEARBY PUBS
Bankside house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blackfriars wine bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Doggetts coat & badge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Founders arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Katzenjammers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mar i terra This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mermaid Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old thameside inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince william henry This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose & crown p h This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Anchor The Anchor is a pub on the south bank of the River Thames, close to Southwark Cathedral and London Bridge station.
The Banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The boot & flogger This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The mad hatter hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The market porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pelt Trader, Arch 3 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pepys This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The rake This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The southwark tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vinopolis city of wine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White hart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zorita’s Kitchen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


South Bank






LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amen Court, EC4M
TUM image id: 1493474208
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ayres Street
TUM image id: 1544924072
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Farringdon Street, EC4M
TUM image id: 1530111130
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Postal area SE1
Licence: CC BY 2.0


"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957)
Licence:


Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Amen Court, EC4M
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Anchor Terrace, SE1 A large symmetrical building on Southwark Bridge Road, Anchor Terrace was built in 1834 for senior employees of the nearby Anchor Brewery. The building was converted into luxury flats in the late 1990s.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Jwslubbock
Licence:


Ayres Street
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Farringdon Street, EC4M
Licence: CC BY 2.0


No 37 Cheapside on the corner of Friday Street (c.1880) The ’Society for Photographing Relics of Old London’ was formed when the Oxford Arms - a traditional galleried pub - was about to be pulled down as part of the new Old Bailey development in 1875. The society subsequently campaigned to record disappearing sights, hurriedly commissioning photographs to capture buildings for posterity. Between 1875 and 1886 they produced photographic records of further buildings under threat, which were issued with descriptive text by the painter (and founder of the Society) Alfred Marks. The focus was architectural, not social; the photographs deliberately exclude signs, notices, people and traffic, to concentrate on the appearance of the bricks and mortar. Few of the streets in their images remain. This section of Friday Street was demolished after the Second World War.
Credit: Society for Photographing Relics of Old London
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