Simon Close, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill

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(51.51222 -0.20039, 51.512 -0.2) 
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Road · Notting Hill · W11 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

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Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
St John’s, Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.

NEARBY STREETS
Artesian Road, W11 Artesian Road lies just over the boundary into Paddington from Notting Hill.
Arundel Gardens, W11 Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Bulmer Mews, W11 Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate.
Campden Hill Towers, W11 Campden Hill Towers is a block.
Chepstow Corner, W2 Chepstow Corner is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Chepstow Place, W2 Chepstow Place runs from the junction of Westbourne Grove and Pembridge Villas in the north to Pembridge Square in the south.
Chepstow Villas, W11 Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.
Clanricarde Gardens, W2 Clanricarde Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove.
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood.
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Road, W11 Colville Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Dawson Place, W2 Dawson Place is a street in Paddington.
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Road, W11 Denbigh Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Terrace, W11 Denbigh Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Evesham House, W2 Residential block
Farmer Street, W8 Farmer Street was formerly Farm Street.
Hereford Road, W2 Hereford Road was planned as a road of detached villas.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road.
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill.
Kensington Mall, W8 Kensington Mall is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Kensington Park Road, W11 Kensington Park Road is one of the main streets in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Gardens, W11 Ladbroke Gardens runs between Ladbroke Grove and Kensington Park Road.
Ladbroke Grove, W11 Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lambton Place, W11 Lambton Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Ledbury Mews North, W11 Ledbury Mews North is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Mews West, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Leinster Square, W2 Leinster Square, along with Prince’s Square, was begun in 1856 and finished in 1864
Linden Gardens, W11 Linden Gardens is a cul-de-sac and the first of James Ladbroke’s plots to be developed.
Linden Mews, W2 Linden Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lonsdale Road, W11 Lonsdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Monmouth Road, W2 Monmouth Road contained cottages and semi-detached villas by 1846
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road was formerly Norfolk Road.
Newcombe House, W2 Residential block
Notting Hill Gate, W8 Notting Hill Gate is a main shopping and retail street.
Ossington Street, W2 Ossington Street leads from Moscow Road at its north end to the Bayswater Road at its south end.
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Gardens, W11 Pembridge Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Place, W2 Pembridge Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Place, W2 Pembridge Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
Pembridge Road, W11 Pembridge Road is a street in London
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane.
Pembridge Square, W2 Pembridge Square was developed between 1856 and 1864.
Pembridge Villas, W11 Pembridge Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Pencombe Mews, W11 Pencombe Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens.
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace.
Princes Mews, W2 Princes Mews is a street in Paddington.
Rabbit Roe, W8 Rabbit Roe is a street in Kensington.
Rede Place, W2 Rede Place is a street in Paddington.
Rosehart Mews, W11 Rosehart Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Vernon Yard, W11 Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road.
Victoria Gardens, W11 Victoria Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Victoria Mews, W11 Victoria Mews is a location in London.
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 Westbourne Grove Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove, W11 Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove, W2 Westbourne Grove began its existence as a footpath.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.

NEARBY PUBS
Beach Blanket Babylon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ladbroke Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Notting Hill Arts Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Polpo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Gold This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Star This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Tavern The Portobello Tavern was located at 138 Portobello Road.
Prince Albert The Prince Albert has been a Notting Hill feature since the 1840s.
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sun in Splendour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Champion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cock & Bottle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Little Yellow Door This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Oxford The Oxford was located at 90-92 Portobello Road.
Uxbridge Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Walmer Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Children of Ruston Close
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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Kensington Park Hotel
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Munro Mews, W10
TUM image id: 1453906723
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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In the neighbourhood...

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Children of Ruston Close
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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square, W11 built in 1887 as a church. Photographed here in 2010.
Credit: Asteuartw
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Duke of Cornwall, Ledbury Road W11, around 1990. Now The Ledbury restaurant, holder of 2 Michelin Stars as of 2014.
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
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The Hippodrome, about 1840, showing St John’s Hill in the background.
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SARM Studios, a recording studio, was established by Chris Blackwell, the founder of Island Records. They were originally known as Basing Street Studios. It has also been known in the past as Island Studios. SARM is an aconym of Sound and Recording Mobiles. At the studios, built inside a former church that had been deconsecrated, Blackwell recorded a number of artists there for Island Records, such as Iron Maiden, Bob Marley, Steve Winwood, Free, Bad Company, Robert Palmer, Jimmy Cliff, Nick Drake, Fairport Convention, King Crimson, John Martyn, Mott the Hoople, Quintessence, Roxy Music, Brian Eno, Sparks, Cat Stevens, Spooky Tooth, Traffic, If, Jethro Tull, the Average White Band, and the Sensational Alex Harvey Band.
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
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