Barons Court

Underground station, existing between 1905 and now

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Underground station · Barons Court · W14 ·
August
16
2020

Barons Court station serves the District and Piccadilly lines.

Barons Court lies between West Kensington and Hammersmith on the District line, and between Earl’s Court and Hammersmith on the Piccadilly line.

When the through tracks were laid on 9 September 1874, the area now known as Barons Court was an area of market gardens west of the hamlet of North End and largely owned by Sir William Palliser.

A decade previously, the 1865 Ordnance Survey Plan shows that most of the area remained in agricultural use, although the main arterial thoroughfares of North End Lane (upgraded and renamed Talgarth Road), North End Road and Old Greyhound Road (later renamed Greyhound Road), then existed.

The name of Barons Court is believed to have been devised by Palliser. Th style of the name to attract potential house buyers may have been suggested by nearby Earls Court or possibly in allusion to the Court Baron held by the Lord of the Manor, the Bishop of London.

By the time of the 1894/5 Ordnance Survey, the majority of local residential development had occurred. Significant developments between the two Surveys included the laying out of Hammersmith Cemetery, then known as Margravine Cemetery.

On 9 October 1905, the District Railway opened a station to serve the new developments and in preparation for the 1906 opening of the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (now the Piccadilly line), then under construction. There is now easy cross-platform interchange between the two lines: District and Piccadilly.

The station is now the final surface stop for eastbound trains on the Piccadilly line until emerging back into the open air at Arnos Grove. In the 1990s, the Grade II listed station was carefully restored to its original appearance.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

Reply
Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Barons Court Barons Court station serves the District and Piccadilly lines.
Gwendwr Garden Gwendwr Gardens is a small park in West Kensington.

THE STREETS OF BARONS COURT
Barons Keep, W14 Barons Keep is a gated community of flats off of Gliddon Road, Barons Court.
Barton Road, W14 Barton Road is a street in West Kensington.
Chalk Hill Road, W6 Chalk Hill Road is a road in the W6 postcode area
Comeragh Road, W14 Comeragh Road is a street in West Kensington.
Drum Street, W14 Drum Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Great Church Lane, W6 Great Church Lane is a street in Hammersmith.
Margravine Gardens, W6 Margravine Gardens runs west from Barons Court station.
Porten Road, W14 Porten Road is a location in London.
Rowan Road, W6 Rowan Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Shortlands, W6 Shortlands commemorates a local field name, first mentioned in the reign of Henry V.
St Paul’s Studios, W14 St Paul’s Studios was designed by Frederick Wheeler and built in 1891.
Talgarth Mansions, W14 Talgarth Mansions is a street in West Kensington.
Talgarth Road, W6 Talgarth Road is the local name for that part of the A4 lying in West Kensington.
Waterhouse Close, W6 Waterhouse Close is a street in Hammersmith.

THE PUBS OF BARONS COURT
Curtain Up This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Latymers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.




LOCAL PHOTOS
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Colet House
Credit: The Study Society
TUM image id: 1605092347
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The St Paul’s Studios block was aimed at the housing of ’bachelor artists’. These unmarried men would require a separate flat for their housekeepers and their artistic endeavours would require the large windows with natural light facing Colet Gardens. And it became so. The block was occupied within a year of being built by the very clientele it had been designed for. The block looked out onto a peaceful suburban scene until the turn of the 1960s. Quiet Colet Gardens, with its milk floats and schoolchildren, fell victim to the upgraded A4 scheme whereby the Cromwell Road was extended westwards to link to the Hammersmith Flyover via this very spot. Renamed as part of the Talgarth Road, the widened route became the main road west out of London towards Heathrow. Thundering lorries put paid to the artistic charms of St Paul’s Studios. Pictures is from the St Paul’s Studios 1891 sales brochure
Credit: Building News magazine
TUM image id: 1604753931
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The main block of Blythe House, seen from Hazlitt Road, Olympia. Blythe House was built between 1899 and 1903 as the main office of the Post Office Savings Bank, which had outgrown its previous headquarter in Queen Victoria Street. By 1902 the Bank had 12,000 branches and more than 9 million accounts.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Docben
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Colet House
Credit: The Study Society
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Talgarth Road’s crossroad with North End Road prior to widening (1950s)
Credit: Alisdair Macdonald
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Barons Keep is a gated community in West Kensington.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence:


The St Paul’s Studios block was aimed at the housing of ’bachelor artists’. These unmarried men would require a separate flat for their housekeepers and their artistic endeavours would require the large windows with natural light facing Colet Gardens. And it became so. The block was occupied within a year of being built by the very clientele it had been designed for. The block looked out onto a peaceful suburban scene until the turn of the 1960s. Quiet Colet Gardens, with its milk floats and schoolchildren, fell victim to the upgraded A4 scheme whereby the Cromwell Road was extended westwards to link to the Hammersmith Flyover via this very spot. Renamed as part of the Talgarth Road, the widened route became the main road west out of London towards Heathrow. Thundering lorries put paid to the artistic charms of St Paul’s Studios. Pictures is from the St Paul’s Studios 1891 sales brochure
Credit: Building News magazine
Licence:


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