Cobley’s Farm

Farm in/near North Finchley, existing until 1905

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Farm · North Finchley · ·
December
7
2017

Cobley’s Farm, also known as Fallow Farm, stood near to the "elbow" of Bow Lane.

The area of Fallow Corner and of Cobley’s (Fallow) Farm (so called by the 17th century) was first recorded in 1429. By the 18th century there was a small hamlet of houses and the access roads from these to the main road formed the distinct Bow Lane. The route of the road was originally part of a lengthy track leading across from Muswell Hill through Coldfall Wood to the northern portion of Church End. Bow Lane, which was named for its shape, was constructed in 1814 after the enclosure of Finchley Common.

Opposite Cobley’s Farm it diverged, the northern portion ultimately doubling back to the Great North Road from Fallow Corner in the form of a "bow," and the western portion proceeding across the fields of the farm to Church End, reaching Ballards Lane by the side of Willow Lodge. The northern of these two branches was known as Fallow Lane.

Fallow Farm was in the possession of the Cobley family in the year 1680. An earlier lease of the farm is in existence, dated 1648. Originally a small farm at the northern corner (Fallow Corner) of Finchley Common, it was gradually expanded by the enclosure of common land. It attained its greatest dimensions as a result of the Enclosure Acts of 1814.

Cobley’s Farm was of considerable extent, occupying the full stretch of land from the Great North Road to Ballards Lane and to Short Lane - the name of the last lane has now vanished.

Between 1806 and 1827 the clown Joseph Grimaldi lived here. It was whilst “ghost writing” Grimaldi’s memoirs that Charles Dickens probably first stayed at the farm during 1836 and 1837. Later, in 1843, he returned and wrote portions of Martin Chuzzlewit, conceiving the character of ’Sairey’ Gamp whilst out walking in Finchley.

The farm continued in the possession of the Cobley family till the closing years of the nineteenth Century. The then owner, Mr Richard Cobley, removed to Cheshunt on the death of his mother. He continued to visit the farm and supervise the work thereon till the buildings were pulled down and the farm broken up for development.

The farm’s fields were released for building, as the Etchingham Park Estate, between 1878 and 1920.

The sale of the farm and the mooted arrival here of electric trams prompted a spate of activity at Fallow Corner in the very early years of the 20th century. Neighbouring Wimbush Farm was sold and its farmhouse demolished. The 13-acre grounds of another large house, Fallow Lodge, were divided into 101 plots and built on. Fallow Court Avenue was laid out around it.

The farm as a working entity halted in 1905.

In 1903 a county school opened and in 1908 a cottage hospital, which was extended in 1922 and renamed Finchley memorial hospital. The few remaining gaps were built on around this time, including the site of Fallow Farm’s farmhouse. Fallow Cottage was sold in 1939 to Wood and Wallers, who knocked it down and built flats on its site.

Note: Article largely derived from "The Finchley Press/Muswell Hill Mercury & Highgate Post" on 20 May 1927


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MARY RUSHTON-BEALES   
Added: 25 Jan 2021 17:58 GMT   

MY GRANDMA GREW UP HERE - 100 WILLIFIELD WAY
MY GRANDMA WINIFRED AND HER BROTHERS ERIC AND JEFF LIVED AT 100 WILLIFIELD WAY. THEY WERE PART OF THE HAMPSTEAD GARDEN SUBURB SOCIAL EXPERIMENT. GRANDMA ALWAYS TALKED ABOUT WILLIFIELD WAY AND HER LIFE IN HAMPSTEAD GARDEN SUBURB WITH GREAT AFFECTION. SHE WAS CONVINCED THAT THEY HAD BETTER EDUCATION BECAUSE THEY LIVED THERE. NOT LONG AGO MY BROTHER AND I TOOK THE TRAIN TO THIS PART OF LONDON AND WALKED DOWN THE ROAD. THE HOUSE IS STILL THERE

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Claigmar Vineyard The Claigmar Vineyard produced Middlesex grapes - and maybe wine.
Cobley’s Farm Cobley’s Farm, also known as Fallow Farm, stood near to the "elbow" of Bow Lane.
Victoria Park One of many Victoria Parks in London, much of this park was originally part of Colby’s Farm.

NEARBY STREETS
Avondale Road, N3 Avondale Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Berkeley Court, N3 Berkeley Court is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Bow Lane, N12 Bow Lane, which was named for its shape, was constructed in 1814 after the enclosure of Finchley Common.
Bow Lane, N3 Mostly in London N12, a very small section of Bow Lane drifts into N3.
Brownlow Road, N3 Brownlow Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Chaplin Square, N12 Chaplin Square is a road in the N12 postcode area
Chislehurst Avenue, N12 Chislehurst Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Clifton Road, N3 Clifton Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Crowder Close, N12 Crowder Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Dickens Avenue, N3 Dickens Avenue is a road in the N3 postcode area
Etchingham Court, N3 Etchingham Court consists of blocks of flats which date from 1935.
Etchingham Park Road, N3 Part of the old Etchingham estate in Finchley was leased to Frederick Wheeler who built substantial brick houses in Etchingham Park Road.
Glebe Road, N12 Glebe Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Glebe Road, N12 Glebe Road is a road in the N12 postcode area
Glebe Road, N3 Glebe Road is a location in London.
Glebelands Close, N12 Glebelands Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Granville Place, N12 Granville Place is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Granville Road, N12 Granville Road connects the High Road with Ballards Lane.
Graywood Court, N12 Graywood Court is a road in the N12 postcode area
Gruneisen Road, N3 Gruneisen Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Heatherdene Close, N12 Heatherdene Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Holdenhurst Avenue, N12 Holdenhurst Avenue is a road in the N3 postcode area
Leisure Way, N12 Leisure Way is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Long Lane, N3 Long Lane runs from Church End to East Finchley.
Montpelier Road, N3 Montpelier Road is a road in the N3 postcode area
Oakfield Road, N3 Oakfield Road is a road in the N3 postcode area
Park Avenue, N3 Park Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Park Close, N3 Park Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Park Crescent, N3 Park Crescent is a road in the N3 postcode area
Park View Road, N3 Park View Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Parkside, N3 Parkside is a road in the N3 postcode area
Queens Avenue, N3 Queens Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Queens Road, N3 Queens Road is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Seymour Road, N3 Seymour Road is a road in the N3 postcode area
Squires Lane, N3 Squires Lane - formerly Squires Place - runs across Finchley. .
Strawberry Vale, N2 Strawberry Vale is now simply a road - it was once an estate.
The Ridgeway, N3 The Ridgeway is a road in the N3 postcode area
Vines Avenue, N3 Vines Avenue was built over an orchard belonging to the nineteenth century Claigmar Vineyard.
Willow Way, N3 Willow Way is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.
Woodlands Avenue, N3 Woodlands Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N3 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Finchley Bowling Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Greek Chef This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Original Brewing Co This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


North Finchley

North Finchley is centred on Tally Ho Corner, the junction of the roads to East Finchley, Finchley Central and Whetstone.

The name of the whole of the modern area covering North Finchley and neighbouring Whetstone was North End, a name first used in 1462.

The rapid enclosure of the countryside in the first years of the nineteenth century meant the end of Finchley Common in 1816, opening up North Finchley from urbanisation - this still took a while nevertheless.

21 cottages were built in Lodge Lane during 1824 and by the 1830s there were other houses - even a chapel by 1837.

By 1839 North Finchley had a blacksmith (on Lodge Lane and not the High Road).

In 1851 there was a regular bus service from the ’Torrington’ to Charing Cross and next came the local railway lines. Christ Church was opened in 1870 and a new parish was formed in 1872.

In 1905 the Metropolitan Electric Tramways started a route between Highgate and Whetstone - a tram depot was opened in Woodberry Grove. Trams and buses together promoted North Finchley’s development.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

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Claigmar Vineyard, Finchley, 1921.
Credit: Britain From Above/Historic England
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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