Scott Ellis Gardens, NW8

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with housing mainly dating from the 1970s

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(51.52828 -0.17596, 51.528 -0.175) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · St John’s Wood · NW8 ·
July
21
2017

Scott Ellis Gardens was built by Thomas Scott-Ellis, 8th Baron Howard de Walden (1880-1946) who was a landowner, writer, Olympic athlete and patron of the arts.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Paddington Fire Station Paddington Fire Station was situated at 492-498 Edgware Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey House, NW8 Abbey House is a block adjacent to Abbey Road studios.
Abercorn Close, NW8 Abercorn Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Abercorn Walk, NW8 Abercorn Walk is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Aberdeen Place, NW8 Aberdeen Place was built on the site of a farm once owned by John Lyon, who founded Harrow School in 1571.
Alexandra Court, W9 Alexandra Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Alma Square, NW8 Alma Square commemorates the River Alma on whose banks the first Anglo-French victory of the Crimean War was won.
Bernhardt Crescent, NW8 Bernhardt Crescent is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Boldero Place, NW8 Boldero Place is a location in London.
Browning Close, W9 Browning Close is named after two poets.
Capland Street, NW8 Capland Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Cavendish Avenue, NW8 Cavendish Avenue was built on land owned by Cavendish family.
Cavendish Close, NW8 Cavendish Close leads off Cavendish Avenue.
Clarendon Terrace, W9 Clarendon Terrace is a street in Maida Vale.
Clifton Court, NW8 Clifton Court is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Clifton Gardens, W9 Clifton Gardens is a road in the W9 postcode area
Clifton Road, W9 Clifton Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Clive Court, W9 Clive Court is a residential block upon Maida Vale.
Cropthorne Court, W9 Cropthorne Court is a road in the W9 postcode area
Cunningham Place, NW8 Cunningham Place is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Denning Close, NW8 Denning Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Elizabeth Close, W9 Elizabeth Close commemorates Elizabeth Barrett Browning, the poet.
Elm Tree Road, NW8 Elm Tree Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Eyre Road, NW8 Eyre Road is a location in London.
Fairlop Place, NW8 Fairlop Place seems to continue the oak theme of the naming of Oak Tree Road - Fairlop Oak is a celebrated tree in Essex.
Fisherton Street, NW8 Fisherton Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Frampton Street, NW8 Frampton Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Garden Road, NW8 Garden Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Gateforth Street, NW8 Gateforth Street is a location in London.
Greenberry Street, NW8 Greenberry Street has a name which is possibly a corruption of Green Barrow Hill.
Grendon Street, NW8 Grendon Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Grove End Road, NW8 Grove End Road has a name reflecting the end of Lisson Grove.
Grove Hall Court, NW8 Grove Hall Court is on Hall Road.
Hall Road, NW8 Hall Road is named after the builder William Hall who died in either 1832 or 1833.
Hamilton Close, NW8 Hamilton Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Hamilton Gardens, NW8 Hamilton Gardens is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Hamilton Terrace, NW8 Hamilton Terrace is named after Charles Hamilton who was a Harrow School governor.
Hanover House, NW8 Hanover House is located on St Johns Wood High Street.
Henderson Drive, NW8 Henderson Drive is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Jerome Crescent, NW8 Jerome Crescent is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Lanark Mews, W9 Lanark Mews is a road in the W9 postcode area
Lanark Place, W9 Lanark Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Lanark Road, W9 Lanark Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Lisson Grove, NW8 Lisson Grove is a corruption of the local manor of Lileston. Originally the road was lined with trees.
Lodge Road, NW8 Lodge Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Maida Vale, W9 Maida Vale is the name of part of the A5 road running through northwest London and ultimately takes its name from a pub.
Melina Place, NW8 Melina Place runs west from Grove End Road.
North Bank, NW8 North Bank is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Northwick Close, NW8 Northwick Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Northwick Terrace, NW8 Northwick Terrace was named after Lord John Northwick, Harrow School governor.
Nugent Terrace, NW8 Nugent Terrace is named after George Nugent-Greville, Baron Nugent (1789-1850).
Oak Tree Road, NW8 Oak Tree Road connects St John’s Wood Road and Lodge Road.
Randolph Crescent, W9 Randolph Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Regents Court, W9 Regents Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Rodney Court, W9 Rodney Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Sandringham Court, W9 Sandringham Court is a residential block upon Maida Vale.
St John’s Wood High Street, NW8 St John’s Wood High Street is a shopping street of St John’s Wood.
St John’s Wood Road, NW8 St John’s Wood Road is a main road connecting Lord’s with Maida Vale.
Stranraer Place, W9 Stranraer Place was a former name for the eastern section of Sutherland Avenue.
Vale Close, W9 Vale Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Verulam Terrace, W9 Verulam Terrace is the former name for a section of the modern Hall Road.
Wellesley Court, W9 Wellesley Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Wellington Place, NW8 Wellington Place, like Wellington Road, is named for the Duke of Wellington who defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo in 1815.
Wellington Road, NW8 Wellington Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area


St John’s Wood

St John’s Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent’s Park.

St John’s Wood was once part of the Great Forest of Middlesex with the name deriving from its mediaeval owners, the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitallers), an Augustinian order. The order took over the land from the Knights Templar in 1323.

After the Reformation and the Dissolution of monastic orders, St John’s Wood became Crown land, and Henry VIII established Royal Hunting Grounds in what became known as Marylebone Park.

Until the end of the eighteenth century, the area was agricultural.

St John’s Wood was developed from the early 19th century onwards. It was one of the first London suburbs to be developed with a large amount of low density ’villa’ housing, as opposed to the terraced housing which was the norm in London up to the 19th century. Parts of St John’s Wood have been rebuilt at a higher density but it remains one of the most expensive areas of London.

St John’s Wood is the location of Lord’s Cricket Ground and for Abbey Road Studios where The Beatles recorded.

The Rolling Stones referenced St John’s Wood in their song Play With Fire. Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones lived on Carlton Hill, at the northern edge of St John’s Wood, in the 1960s.

St John’s Wood station was opened on 20 November 1939 on a new section of deep-level tunnel constructed between Baker Street and Finchley Road when the Metropolitan Line’s services on its Stanmore branch were transferred to the Bakerloo Line. It was transferred along with the rest of the Stanmore branch to the Jubilee Line when it opened in 1979. With the opening of St John’s Wood station, two nearby stations on the Metropolitan Line were closed. These were Lord’s (which had originally been opened in 1868 as St John’s Wood Road) and Marlborough Road.

The station building is located on the corner of Acacia Road and Finchley Road. The station is the nearest one to Lord’s Cricket Ground and Abbey Road Studios. For this reason Beatles memorabilia are sold at the station.

The platform design remains the same as when opened in 1939, and was designed by Harold Stabler.


LOCAL PHOTOS

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
A photographer called Iain Macmillan was a friend of John and Yoko and, during the morning of Friday 8 August 1969 found himself commissioned to take a photo of the Fab Four to adorn their latest studio release, an album called ’Abbey Road’. As the group waited outside the studio for the shoot to begin, Linda McCartney took a number of extra photographs.
Credit: Apple Corps
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The 1807 Hyatt map
Credit: British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Derived from a somewhat famous cover work by Iain Macmillan. Behind the art, the view is Abbey Road, NW8 looking north. The gates of the Abbey Road Studios are behind the white VW Beetle on the left.
Credit: Iain Macmillan
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Paddington Fire Station (c.1900)
Credit: London Metropolitan Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

St John’s Wood was once on the Bakerloo Line
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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