Clarkson Row, NW1

Road in/near Mornington Crescent

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(51.53314 -0.14136, 51.533 -0.141) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Mornington Crescent · NW1 ·
August
8
2017

Clarkson Row is a road in the NW1 postcode area





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Rhodes Farm Rhodes Farm was situated on Hampstead Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Street, NW1 Albany Street runs from Marylebone Road to Gloucester Gate following the east side of Regent’s Park.
Albert Street, NW1 Albert Street runs north-south in Camden Town.
Ampthill Square, NW1 Ampthill Square is a name which has existed in two different time periods.
Augustus House, NW1 Residential block
Augustus Street, NW1 Augustus Street - after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV).
Barnby Street, NW1 Barnby Street is a street in Camden Town.
Bayham Place, NW1 Bayham Place is a short cobbled street.
Beatty Street, NW1 Beatty Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Bridgeway Street, NW1 Bridgeway Street is a street in Camden Town.
Cardington Street, NW1 Cardington Street is a rare London street in that it closed for good as late as 2017.
Carlow Street, NW1 Carlow Street is a location in London.
Centric Close, NW1 Centric Close is a street in Camden Town.
Chester Close North, NW1 Chester Close North is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Church Studios, NW1 Church Studios is a street in Camden Town.
Compton Close, NW1 Compton Close is a street in Camden Town.
Cranleigh Street, NW1 Cranleigh Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crowndale Court, NW1 Crowndale Court is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crowndale Road, NW1 Crowndale Road was at first called Fig Lane and then Gloucester Place.
Cumberland Market, NW1 Cumberland Market is a street in Camden Town.
Cumberland Terrace, NW1 Cumberland Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Delancey Passage, NW1 Delancey Passage is a street in Camden Town.
Delancey Street, NW1 Delancey Street is a street in Camden Town.
Eversholt Street, NW1 Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town.
Forge Place, NW1 Forge Place is a street in Camden Town.
Gloucester Gate Mews, NW1 Gloucester Gate Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Gloucester Gate, NW1 Gloucester Gate is a street in Camden Town.
Godwin Court, NW1 Godwin Court is a street in Camden Town.
Granby Terrace, NW1 Granby Terrace was previously called Granby Street.
Hampstead Road, NW1 Hampstead Road connects the Euston Road with Camden.
Harrington Square, NW1 Harrington Square is named after the Earl of Harrington, one of whose daughters married the seventh Duke of Bedford.
Harrington Street, NW1 Harrington Street leads north from Varndell Street.
Hopkinsons Place, NW1 Hopkinsons Place is a street in Camden Town.
Hurdwick Place, NW1 Hurdwick Place is a street in Camden Town.
King’s Terrace, NW1 King’s Terrace was formerly Little King Street South and Little King Street North.
Lidlington Place, NW1 Lidlington Place is a street in Camden Town.
Lydford, NW1 Lydford is a street in Camden Town.
Mary Terrace, NW1 Mary Terrace is a street in Camden Town.
Mayford, NW1 Mayford is a street in Camden Town.
Millbrook Place, NW1 Millbrook Place is a street in Camden Town.
Miller Street, NW1 Miller Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Crescent, NW1 Mornington Crescent was named after Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington.
Mornington Street, NW1 Mornington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Terrace, NW1 Mornington Terrace is a street in Camden Town.
Oakley Square, NW1 Oakley Square is a street in Camden Town.
Park Village East, NW1 Park Village East was part of a proposed canal-side village.
Park Village Mews, NW1 Park Village Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Park Village West, NW1 Park Village West is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Plender Street, NW1 William Plender, 1st Baron Plender was an accountant and public servant who served as Sheriff of the County of London in 1927.
Pratt Mews, NW1 Pratt Mews dates from the 1790s.
Redhill Street, NW1 Redhill Street is a street in Camden Town.
Regents Park, NW1 Regents Park is a street in Camden Town.
Signmakers Yard, NW1 Signmakers Yard is a road in the NW1 postcode area
St Katharines Precinct, NW1 St Katharines Precinct is a street in Camden Town.
Stanley Buildings, NW1 Stanley Buildings is a street in Camden Town.
Swallowfield, NW1 Swallowfield is a street in Camden Town.
The Law Society Freepost, NW1 The Law Society Free post is a street in Camden Town.
Triton Mall, NW1 Triton Mall is a street in Camden Town.
Triton Square Mall, NW1 Triton Square Mall is a street in Camden Town.
Troutbeck, NW1 Troutbeck is a street in Camden Town.
Varndell Street, NW1 Varndell Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Werrington Street, NW1 Werrington Street is a street in Camden Town.

NEARBY PUBS
Alexander the Great This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Beatrice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Belushi’s Camden This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Eastnor Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Edinboro Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Elixir Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Koko This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lyttleton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Arthur This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blues Kitchen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Purple Turtle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sheephaven Bay This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Victory This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The York & Albany P.H This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Mornington Crescent

Mornington Crescent is a London Underground station in Camden Town, named after the nearby street.

The station was opened as part of the original route of the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (now the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line) on 22 June 1907. After opening, it was little used, and for many years it was open only on weekdays, and before 1966 Edgware-bound trains passed through without stopping.

On 23 October 1992 the station was shut so that the then 85-year-old lifts could be replaced. The intention was to open it within one year. However, the state of neglect meant other work had to be completed, and the station was closed for most of the 1990s, amidst talk of it closing permanently.

However, a concerted campaign to reopen the station was launched, as the station is held in fond regard due to the popular BBC Radio 4 panel game I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue, which frequently features the game round Mornington Crescent, a game which takes its name from the station.

Mornington Crescent, the game, consists of each panellist in turn announcing a landmark or street, most often a tube station on the London Underground system. The apparent aim is to be the first to announce "Mornington Crescent". Interspersed with the turns is humorous discussion amongst the panellists and host regarding the rules and legality of each move, as well as the strategy the panellists are using. Despite appearances, however, there are no rules to the game, and both the naming of stations and the specification of ’rules’ are based on stream-of-consciousness association and improvisation. Thus the game is intentionally incomprehensible.

The station was reopened on 27 April 1998 by the regular cast of I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue (Humphrey Lyttelton, Barry Cryer, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Graeme Garden) and a memorial plaque to the late Willie Rushton, one of the longest-serving panelists, was installed at the station in 2002.

Since its reopening, the station has been open at the same times as most other stations, including weekends, in an attempt to relieve the pressure on the increasingly busy nearby Camden Town station.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Camden Town 1920s.
TUM image id: 1557159163
Licence: CC BY 2.0
All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
TUM image id: 1492970567
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Camden High Street
TUM image id: 1547918916
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
TUM image id: 1499354315
Licence: CC BY 2.0
St. James Gardens
Credit: Google
TUM image id: 1530005129
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Camden Town 1920s.
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The Camden Head on Camden High Street, taken in 1903. The Camden Head is a public house and live venue which first opened towards the end of the 19th century.
Old London postcard
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All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
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Camden High Street
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Cobden Statue, corner of Eversholt Street and Camden High Street (1905)
Old London postcard
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Camden Town, from the Hampstead Road, Marylebone (1780)
Credit: Old and New London: Volume 5 (1878)
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Mornington Crescent, northwest quadrant (1904). The view includes no.31 where Spencer Gore rented a room between 1909–12.
Credit: Camden Local Studies and Archives Centre
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An STL bus entering Park Street from the High Street (1930). The former Brittania pub is on the extreme right. The pub was later a shop and its ornamental lamps have long disappeared. The bank building, seen between the two buses, belonged to the Westminster Bank, who amalgamated with the National Provincial to become the Natwest.
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Extract from Map of the parish of St Marylebone and parish of St Pancras in London, 1797
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Harrington Street, NW1 about the turn of the twentieth century. This street runs parallel with Hampstead Road, one block west.
Old London postcard
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