South Bank

Suburb, existing until now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.507 -0.113, 51.507 -0.113) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: Adjust the MAP YEAR and ZOOM to tweak historical maps
Suburb · South Bank · ·
December
23
2011






CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

Reply
Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply
Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

Reply

Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

Reply
Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

Reply
Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply
Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

Reply
Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

Reply
Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
101 Strand, WC2R This shop was one of the first in London to have gas lighting fitted.
Ackermann’s Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
Hole In the Wall The Hole In The Wall is a local Waterloo institution.
Hungerford Bridge Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.
Shipley’s Drawing School 101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.

THE STREETS OF SOUTH BANK
Addington Street, SE1 Addington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Addiscombe Court Road, CR0 Addiscombe Court Road is named after house called Addiscombe Court.
Aquinas Street, SE1 Aquinas Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Barge House Street, SE1 Barge House Street is a renamed section of Upper Ground Street.
Belvedere Road, SE1 Belvedere Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Brad Street, SE1 Brad Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Broadwall, SE1 Broadwall is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cardinal Cap Alley, SE1 Cardinal Cap Alley is an alley in Bankside.
Casson Square, SE1 Casson Square is a square of South Bank buildings.
Coin Street, SE1 Coin Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Concert Hall Approach, SE1 Concert Hall Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cornwall Road, SE1 Cornwall Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Doon Street, SE1 Doon Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Duchy Street, SE1 Duchy Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Enterprise House, SE1 Residential block
Exton Street, SE1 Exton Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Forum Magnum Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gabriels Wharf, SE1 Gabriels Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Greet Street, SE1 Greet Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Henry House, SE1 Henry House is a residential block.
Lebanon Gardens, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Lebanon Road, CR0 Lebanon Road may have received its name from the ’forest and other trees’ of the former Brickwood House.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Miller Walk, SE1 Miller Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
National Film Theatre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Old Barge House Alley, SE1 This is an article about Old Barge House Alley.
Oxo Tower Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Platts Lane, WC1R Platts Lane is a location in London.
Riverside Walk, SE1 Riverside Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Roupell Street, SE1 Roupell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Samford Street, SE1 Samford Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Secker Street, SE1 Secker Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
South Bank, SE1 South Bank is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southbank Centre Square, SE1 Southbank Centre Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Southbank, SE1 Southbank is a road in the SE9 postcode area
Stamford Street Apartments, SE1 This block stands on Stamford Street.
Stamford Street, SE1 Stamford Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Queen’s Steps, SE1 The Queen’s Steps is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Theed Street, SE1 Theed Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Upper Ground, SE1 Upper Ground is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge, as well as being the bridge itself, lends its name to the southern approach road.
Waterloo Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Wayerloo Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Whitehouse Apartments, SE1 Whitehouse Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Whittlesey Street, SE1 Whittlesey Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area

THE PUBS OF SOUTH BANK
Doggetts coat & badge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Founders arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Namco Funscape This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Mulberry Bush This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Understudy This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Wellington Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The White Hart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.




LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
TUM image id: 1556885410
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Farringdon Street, EC4M
TUM image id: 1530111130
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Hole In The Wall, Waterloo
Credit: Virtual Tourist
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Sea Life London Aquarium is located on the ground floor of County Hall on the South Bank of the River Thames, near the London Eye. It opened in March 1997 as the London Aquarium and hosts about one million visitors each year.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Middle Temple Lane looking towards Victoria Embankment (2008) The buildings are mainly occupied by barristers’ chambers
Credit: Wiki Commons/J D Mack
Licence: CC BY 2.0


At the southern end of Carmelite Street in the City of London stood the Victorian-era Whitefriars Fire Station.
Credit: Wiki Commons
Licence:


Deep beneath the former Eurostar terminal at Waterloo Station, Leake Street, once a dismal, tunnel for vehicular traffic now enjoys a new lease of life as an ever changing, unofficial art gallery.
Credit: Instagram/@njcoxx
Licence:


Postcard of the then-new Victoria Embankment (1890s) The Victoria Embankment was primarily designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette. It incorporates the main low level interceptor sewer and the underground District Line over which a wide road and riverside walkway were built.
Old London postcard
Licence:


York Road, South Bank (2013) York Road started its life in 1824. Part of the land was sold to the London and South Western Railway in 1848 when the line was extended from Nine Elms. Waterloo Station, which was raised above the marshy ground on a series of arches, was designed by Sir William Tite and opened on 11 July 1848.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Mikey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Oswaldestre House, Norfolk Street.
Credit: Bedford Lemere and Company
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View of the junction of Howard Street and Norfolk Street (1880).
Credit: John Crowther
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy