Oxford Street, W1D

Road in/near Oxford Circus

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(51.51568 -0.13818, 51.515 -0.138) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Oxford Circus · W1D ·
JANUARY
20
2018

This is a street in the W1F postcode area




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

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Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

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Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

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Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

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Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Josh   
Added: 18 Apr 2021 21:00 GMT   

Winchfield House, SW15
Designed 1952-53. Constructed 1955-58

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Adam and Eve Inn The Adam and Eve was an inn on Oxford Street.
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
All Souls Church All Souls Church is an evangelical Anglican church situated at the north end of Regent Street.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
L’Escargot L’Escargot is one of London’s oldest restaurants.
Oxford Circus Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.
Queen’s Theatre The Queen’s Theatre is located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street.

NEARBY STREETS
Adam and Eve Court, W1D The court was named for the nearby Adam and Eve tavern.
All Souls Place, W1B All Souls Place is a short cul-de-sac in the shadow of All Souls Church, originating in the eighteenth century as a mews off Edward Street.
Argyll Street, W1F Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century.
Avery Row, W1K Avery Row was probably named after Henry Avery, an 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook.
Bateman Street, W1D Bateman Street was named for Sir James Bateman, local landowner and Lord Mayor of London in the 1670s.
Batemans Buildings, W1D Batemans Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bayley Street, WC1B Bayley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Beak Street, W1B Beak Street runs roughly east-west between Regent Street and Lexington Street.
Beak Street, W1F Beak Street is named after Thomas Beake, one of the Queen’s messengers.
Berners Mews, W1T Berners Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Place, W1T Berners Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Street, W1D William Berners completed building in 1763 what is today Berners Street.
Berners Street, W1T Berners Street runs from the junction of Oxford Street and Wardour Street to join up with Mortimer Street and the former Middlesex Hospital.
Berwick Road, W1F Berwick Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Berwick Street, W1F Berwick Street commemorates the Duke of Berwick, an illegitimate son of James II.
Bird Street, W1T Bird Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bourlet Close, W1W Bourlet Close is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Bridle Lane, W1F Bridle Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broadwick Street, W1F Broadwick Street runs west-east between Marshall Street and Wardour Street, crossing Berwick Street.
Bromley Place, W1T Bromley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Bywell Place, W1W Bywell Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Candover Street, W1W Candover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Cape Yard, W1D A street within the W1D postcode
Carlisle Street, W1D Carlisle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Carlisle Walk, W1D Carlisle Walk is a road in the E8 postcode area
Carnaby Street, W1F Carnaby Street became the heart of Swinging London.
Cavendish Place, W1G Cavendish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Cavendish Square, W1G Cavendish Square was laid out in 1717–18 at the beginning of the transformation of Harley family lands in Marylebone.
Cavendish Street, W1G Cavendish Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Chandos Street, W1G Chandos Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Chapone Place, W1D Chapone Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Charlotte Place, W1T Charlotte Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Charlotte Street, W1T Charlotte Street was laid out in the mid 18th century on open fields.
Colville Place, W1T Colville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
D’Arblay Street, W1F D’Arblay Street is a location in London.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dean Street, W1D Dean Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dean’s Mews, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
Deans Mews, W1G Deans Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Dering Street, W1S Dering Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Duchess Mews, W1B Duchess Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Duchess Street, W1B Duchess Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
Duchess Street, W1W Duchess Street runs from Mansfield Street to Hallam Street, across Portland Place.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dufours Place, W1F Dufours Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
East Street, W1T East Street is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Eastcastle Street, W1D Eastcastle Street was originally called Castle Street East.
Eastcastle Street, W1T The portion of Eastcastle Street to the east of Wells Street originally belonged to the Berners Estate.
Evelyn Yard, W1T Evelyn Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Falconberg Court, W1D Falconberg Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
Flaxman Court, W1F Flaxman Court is a road in the W1F postcode area
Foley Street, W1W Foley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Foubert’s Place, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Fouberts Place, W1F Fouberts Place is named after a Frenchman who had a riding school here in the reign of Charles II.
Frith Street, W1D Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder.
Ganton Street, W1F Ganton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Gerrard Place, W1D Gerrard Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gerrard Street, W1D Gerrard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Goodge Place, W1T Goodge Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Gosfield Street, W1W Gosfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Great Castle Street, W1B Great Castle Street was begun in 1722.
Great Castle Street, W1W Great Castle Street was one of the main streets of the Harley Estate.
Great Chapel Street, W1D Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Marlborough Street, W1B Great Marlborough Street runs east of Regent Street past Carnaby Street towards Noel Street.
Great Marlborough Street, W1F Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough.
Great Pulteney Street, W1F Great Pulteney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Titchfield Street, W1W Great Titchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Greek Court, W1D Greek Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Greek Street, W1D Greek Street leads south from Soho Square to Shaftesbury Avenue.
Greens Court, W1D Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Gresse Street, W1T Gresse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanover Square, W1S Hanover Square was created as the ’Whig’ square with Cavendish Square being the ’Tory’ square.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Hanway Place, W1T Hanway Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanway Street, W1D Hanway Street was named after Major John Hanway.
Hanway Street, W1T Hanway Street is a location in London.
Harcourt House, W1G Residential block
Harewood Place, W1C Harewood Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Holland Street, W1F Holland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Holles Street, W1C Holles Street runs north from Oxford Street, on the east side of the John Lewis store.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Horse and Dolphin Yard, W1D Horse and Dolphin Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
International House, W1S Residential block
John Prince’s Street, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
John Princes Street, W1G John Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
Kingly Court, W1B Kingly Court is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Kingly Street, W1F Kingly Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Lancashire Court, W1K Lancashire Court is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Langham House, W1B Residential block
Langham Place, W1B Langham Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Langham Street, W1W Langham Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Lexington Street Cos, W1F Lexington Street Cos is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Linen Hall, W1B Linen Hall is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Little Marlborough Street, W1B Little Marlborough Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Little Portland Street, W1W Little Portland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Little Titchen Street, W1W Little Titchen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Little Titchfield Street, W1W Little Titchfield Street is a road in the W1W postcode area
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Lowndes Court, W1F Lowndes Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Manette Street, W1D Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities.
Mansfield Street, W1G Mansfield Street connects New Cavendish Street and Queen Anne Street.
Margaret Court, W1W Margaret Court is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Margaret Street, W1B Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Margaret Street, W1G Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Margaret Street, W1W Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Market Place, W1W Market Place is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Marlborough Court, W1F Marlborough Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marshall Street, W1F Marshall Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marylebone Passage, W1W Marylebone Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Mayfair Mews, W1K A street within the W1S postcode
Meard Street, W1D John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Medici Courtyard, W1S Medici Courtyard is a location in London.
Mews Yard, W1K Mews Yard is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Middleton Buildings, W1W Middleton Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Middleton Place, W1W Middleton Place is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Milford House, W1G Residential block
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Morley House, W1W Residential block
Mortimer Street, W1T Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1T A street within the W1W postcode
Mortimer Street, W1W Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1W Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Morwell Street, WC1B Morwell Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Nassau Street, W1W Nassau Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
New Bond Street, W1J New Bond Street is the northernmost section of what is simply known as ’Bond Street’ in general use.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
Newburg Road, W1F Newburg Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newburgh Street, W1F Newburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newman Passage, W1T Newman Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newman Street, W1T Newman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Noel Street, W1F Noel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Old Cavendish Street, W1 Old Cavendish Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Circus, W1B Oxford Circus was originally called Regent Circus.
Oxford Street, W1C This is a street in the W1A postcode area
Oxford Street, W1D This is a street in the W1D postcode area
Palladium House, W1B Palladium House is a grade II listed (in 1981) Art Deco office building located on the corner of Great Marlborough Street and Argyll Street.
Percy Street, WC1B Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Poland Street, W1D Poland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Poland Street, W1F Poland Street is a location in London.
Portland Mews, W1F Portland Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Portland Place, W1B This is a street in the W1A postcode area
Princes Street, W1B Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Princess House, W1D Residential block
Queen Anne Mews, W1G Queen Anne Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Ramillies Place, W1F Ramillies Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ramillies Street, W1F Ramillies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Rathbone Place, W1T Rathbone Place honours Captain Rathbone who was the builder of the road and properties thereon from 1718 onwards.
Rathbone Square, W1T Rathbone Square is a location in London.
Rathbone Street, W1T Rathbone Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Regent Place, W1B Regent Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Regent Street, W1B This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Richmond Buildings, W1D Richmond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Richmond Mews, W1D Richmond Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Riding House Street, W1W Riding House Street commemorates a riding house and barracks of the First Troop of Horse Grenadier Guards.
Romilly Street, W1D Romilly Street is a small street that runs behind Shaftesbury Avenue and takes its name from lawyer Samuel Romilly.
Royalty Mews, W1D Royalty Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Salt Yard, W1T A street within the W1T postcode
Sandringham Court, W1F Sandringham Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.
Sheraton Street, W1D Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Soho Place, Soho Place lies within the postcode.
Soho Square, W1D In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London.
Soho Street, W1D Soho Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
St Anne’s Court, W1F St Anne’s Court is an alleyway that connects Dean Street and Wardour Street.
St George Street, W1S St George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
St Georges Square, W1S St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Stephen Mews, W1T Stephen Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Stephen Street, W1T Stephen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
Swallow Place, W1B Swallow Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Tenterden Street, W1S Tenterden Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Tisbury Court, W1D Tisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Tottenham Court Road, W1T Tottenham Court Road is a major road running from the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, north to Euston Road - a distance of about three-quarters of a mile.
Townsend House, W1D Residential block
Union Street, W1W The easternmost section of Riding House Street was previously known as Union Street.
Upper James Street, W1F Upper James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Upper John Street, W1F Upper John Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Walkers Court, Walkers Court lies within the postcode.
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Mews, W1F Wardour Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Portland Street.
Wardour Street, W1F Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street.
Wedgwood Mews, W1D Wedgwood Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Wells Mews, W1W Wells Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Wells Street, W1D Wells Street - ’Welses Lane’ - is first recorded in 1692.
Windmill Street, W1T Windmill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is a road in the W1D postcode area


Oxford Circus

Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

Oxford Circus, the busy intersection of Oxford Street and Regent Street, was constructed in the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash. Regent Street had been commissioned by Prince Regent, who was later to become King George IV, as a grand scheme to connect the Princes home at Carlton House with his newly acquired property at Regents Park. Nash designed a wide boulevard with a sweeping curve that became a clear dividing line between the less respectable Soho and the fashionable squares and streets of Mayfair. Born from the concept of Nash’s layout of the New Street in 1812, frontage alignments remain, with the rebuilt listed architecture of 1920s buildings.

The surrounding area contains important elements of the Nash heritage. All frontages on the Circus are Grade II Listed. The entire of Regent Street is also listed and sits within a conservation area.

The circus is served by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.

Oxford Circus station has entrances on all four corners of the intersection. The station is an interchange between the Central, Victoria and Bakerloo lines. It is the fourth busiest station on the network and the busiest without connection to the National Rail service. It opened on the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900, with the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway’s platforms opening on 10 March 1906. The two companies had separate surface buildings and lift shafts. The station buildings, which remain today as exits from the station, were constructed on very confined plots on either side of Argyll Street on the south side of Oxford Street, just to the east of the circus itself. The stations were originally built as entirely separate, but connecting passages were swiftly provided at platform level. The surviving Central London Railway building to the east of Argyll Street is the best surviving example of the stations designed by Harry Bell Measures, and the Bakerloo line building to the west is a classic Leslie Green structure. Both station buildings are Grade II listed.

Almost from the outset, overcrowding has been a constant problem at the station and it has seen numerous improvements to its facilities and below-ground arrangements to deal with this difficulty. After much discussion between the then two separate operators, a major reconstruction began in 1912. This saw a new ticket hall, dealing with both lines, built in the basement of the Bakerloo station, the Bakerloo lifts removed, and new deep-level escalators opened down to the Bakerloo line level. Access to the Central line was by way of existing deep-level subways. The new works came into use on 9 May 1914 with the CLR lifts still available for passengers. By 1923 even this rearrangement was unable to cope, so a second rebuilding commenced. This saw a second set of escalators built directly down to the Central line, the CLR station building becoming an exit only. Then, on 2 October 1928, a third escalator leading to the Bakerloo platforms was opened. Unusually, lifts came back into prominence at an Underground station when, in 1942, a set of high-speed lifts came into use, largely used as an exit route from the Central line platforms directly to the Argyll Street exit building.

The Victoria line opened on 7 March 1969. To handle the additional passenger loads, a new ticket hall was constructed directly under the road junction. To excavate the new ticket hall below the roadway, traffic was diverted for five years (August 1963 to Easter 1968) on to a temporary bridge-like structure known as the ’umbrella’ covering the Regent Street/Oxford Street intersection. Services tunnels were constructed to carry water mains and telecom cables past the new ticket hall. Construction of the Victoria line station tunnels with their platforms, the new escalator shafts and the linking passages to the Central line platforms was carried out from access shafts sunk from nearby Cavendish Square, Upper Regent Street and Argyll Street. To this day, traffic passing through the Oxford Circus intersection literally travels over the roof of the ticket office.


LOCAL PHOTOS
BT Tower
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Transmission
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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Leicester Square (1880)
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Newport Court streetsign
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In the neighbourhood...

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BT Tower
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The Prince of Wales Theatre in 1903 shortly before its demolition for the building of the Scala Theatre in 1904.
Credit: Caroline Blomfield
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Fairyland, 92 Tottenham Court Road London circa 1905
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Transmission
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Piccadilly Theatre (2007)
Credit: Turquoisefish
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De Hems, 11 Macclesfield Street and the entrance to Horse & Dolphin Yard.
Credit: Colonel Warden
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The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
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Musicians waiting for work on Archer Street.
Credit: Musicians Union
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Tottenham Court Road, W1T
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Bilingual Wardour Street
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