The Angel

Pub/bar in/near St Giles

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(51.51548 -0.12772, 51.515 -0.127) 
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Pub/bar · St Giles · WC2H ·
JUNE
21
2018

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

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Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
British Museum British Museum was a station on the Central line, located in Holborn and taking its name from the nearby British Museum in Great Russell Street.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
L’Escargot L’Escargot is one of London’s oldest restaurants.
Queen’s Theatre The Queen’s Theatre is located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street.
St Giles St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Trident Studios Trident Studios was located at 17 St Anne’s Court between 1968 and 1981.

NEARBY STREETS
Adeline Place, WC1B Adeline Place was named after Adeline Marie Russell.
Archer Street, W1D Archer Street was Arch Street in 1675, Orchard Street in 1720 and Archer Street by 1746.
Arne Street, WC2E Arne Street was named after the 18th century composer Thomas Arne, who was born near here.
Bainbridge Street, WC2H Bainbridge Street takes its name from Henry Bainbridge, a local resident in the 17th century.
Banbury Court, WC2E Banbury Court is named for Nicholas Knollys, 3rd Earl of Banbury, who owned a house here called Banbury House.
Barter Street, WC1A Barter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Bateman Street, W1D Bateman Street was named for Sir James Bateman, local landowner and Lord Mayor of London in the 1670s.
Batemans Buildings, W1D Batemans Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bayley Street, WC1B Bayley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Beaumont Buildings, WC2E Beaumont Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Bedford Avenue, WC1B Bedford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Chambers, WC2E Bedford Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Square, WC1B Bedford Square was designed as a unified architectural composition in 1775-6 by Thomas Leverton.
Berners Place, W1T Berners Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berwick Road, W1F Berwick Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Berwick Street, W1F Berwick Street commemorates the Duke of Berwick, an illegitimate son of James II.
Betterton Street, WC2E Betterton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bloomsbury Square, WC1A The 4th Earl of Southampton was granted a building license for the construction of Bloomsbury Square in 1661.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1A Bloomsbury Street runs from Gower Street in the north to the junction of New Oxford Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in the south.
Bloomsbury Way, WC1A Bloomsbury Way is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bow Street, WC2B Bow Street was built in the shape of a bow between 1633 and 1677.
Bow Street, WC2E Bow Street was first developed by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford in 1633.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broad Court, WC2B Broad Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Bucknall Street, WC2H Bucknall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Burleigh Street, WC2R Burleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bury Place, WC1A Bury Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Cambridge Circus, WC2H Cambridge Circus is the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road.
Cape Yard, W1D A street within the W1D postcode
Carlisle Street, W1D Carlisle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Carlisle Walk, W1D Carlisle Walk is a road in the E8 postcode area
Carriage Hall, WC2E Carriage Hall is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Castlewood House, WC1A Residential block
Catton Street, WC2B Catton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Central Arcade, WC2E Central Arcade is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Centre Point, WC2H Centre Point is a controversial 1960s-built tower block.
Chapone Place, W1D Chapone Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Charing Cross Road, WC2H Charing Cross Road is a street running immediately north of St Martin-in-the-Fields to St Giles Circus.
Ching Court, WC2H Ching Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Clare Market, WC2E This is a street in the WC2E postcode area
Colville Place, W1T Colville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Coptic Street, WC2H Coptic Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Covent Garden, WC2E Covent Garden, is the name of a district, but also the name of the central square which formerly hosted a fruit-and-vegetable market.
Cranbourn Street, WC2H Cranbourne Street was named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset.
Crown Court, WC2E Crown Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dean Street, W1D Dean Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place was an alleyway one block north of Denmark Street.
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Drury Lane, WC2B Drury Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Dryden Street, WC2B Dryden Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dudley Court, WC2H Dudley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dyott Street, WC1A Dyott Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Earlham Street, WC2H Earlham Street is one of the spokes leading off of Seven Dials.
Earnshaw Street, WC2H Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street.
East Street, W1T East Street is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Endell Street, WC2H Endell Street, originally known as Belton Street, is a street that runs from High Holborn in the north to Long Acre and Bow Street in the south.
Evelyn Yard, W1T Evelyn Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Excel Court, WC2H Excel Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Falconberg Court, W1D Falconberg Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
Fisher Street, WC1R Fisher Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Flaxman Court, W1F Flaxman Court is a road in the W1F postcode area
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Floral Court, WC2E Floral Court is a location in London.
Floral Street, WC2E Floral Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Frith Street, W1D Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder.
Galen Place, WC1A Galen Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Garrick Street, WC2N Garrick Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Gerrard Place, W1D Gerrard Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gerrard Street, W1D Gerrard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gilbert Place, WC1A Gilbert Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Grape Street, WC2H Grape Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Chapel Street, W1D Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Newport Street, WC2H Great Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Queen Street, WC2B Great Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Great Russell Street, WC1A Great Russell Street commemorates the marriage of the daughter of the 4th Earl of Southampton to William Russell in 1669.
Great Windmill Street, W1F Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre.
Greek Court, W1D Greek Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Greek Street, W1D Greek Street leads south from Soho Square to Shaftesbury Avenue.
Greens Court, W1D Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Gresse Street, W1T Gresse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanover Place, WC2E Hanover Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Hanway Place, W1T Hanway Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanway Street, W1D Hanway Street was named after Major John Hanway.
Hanway Street, W1T Hanway Street is a location in London.
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road which is the highest point in the City of London - 22 metres above sea level.
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Hog Lane, WC2H Hog Lane was a lane that went from St Giles’ leper hospital (set up in the 12th century) to the monument to Eleanor at Charing Cross.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Horse and Dolphin Yard, W1D Horse and Dolphin Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
James Street, WC2E James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Jubilee Market, WC2E Jubilee Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Keeley Street, WC2B Keeley Street has a dual history
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
King Street, WC2E King Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Kingsgate Street, WC1R Kingsgate Street ran from High Holborn to Theobald’s Road.
Langley Court, WC2E Langley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Street, WC2H Langley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Litchfield Street, WC2H Litchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Compton Street, W1D Little Compton Street was a street in Soho.
Little Newport Street, WC2H Little Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Russel Street, WC1A Little Russel Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Little Russell Street, WC1A Little Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Long Acre, WC2E Long Acre is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Macklin Street, WC2B Macklin Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Manette Street, W1D Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities.
Martlett Court, WC2E Martlett Court is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Meard Street, W1D John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Mercer Street, WC2H Mercer Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Monmouth Street, WC2H Monmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Moor Street, W1D Moor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Morwell Street, WC1B Morwell Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Museum Street, WC1A Museum Street is so-named since it approaches the main entrance of the British Museum.
Neal Street, WC2H Neal Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Neals Yard, WC2H Neals Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Oxford Street, WC1A New Oxford Street was built in 1840 to ease congestion in St Giles High Street.
New Oxford Street, WC2H New Oxford Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Newman Passage, W1T Newman Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newman Street, W1T Newman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newport Court, WC2H Newport Court was laid out approximately on the site of the courtyard of Newport House.
Newport Place, W1D Newport Place was named after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on Newport Street in the 17th century.
Newton Street, WC1V Newton Street is named for Isaac Newton, scientist and mathematician.
Nottingham Court, WC2H Nottingham Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Odhams Walk, WC2H Odhams Walk is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Orange Street, WC1R Orange Street disappeared from the map to be replaced by St Martin’s College of Art (now Central Saint Martins).
Parker Mews, WC2B Parker Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Parker Street, WC2B Parker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Peabody Trust Estate, WC2B Peabody Trust Estate is a road in the SE24 postcode area
Peabody Trust Estate, WC2B Peabody Trust Estate is a road in the SE21 postcode area
Percy Street, WC1B Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Phoenix Street, WC2H Phoenix Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Pied Bull Court, WC1A Pied Bull Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Pied Bull Yard, WC1A Pied Bull Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Rathbone Place, W1T Rathbone Place honours Captain Rathbone who was the builder of the road and properties thereon from 1718 onwards.
Rathbone Square, W1T Rathbone Square is a location in London.
Rathbone Street, W1T Rathbone Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Richmond Buildings, W1D Richmond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Richmond Mews, W1D Richmond Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Romilly Street, W1D Romilly Street is a small street that runs behind Shaftesbury Avenue and takes its name from lawyer Samuel Romilly.
Rose Street, WC2N Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Royalty Mews, W1D Royalty Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Russell Chambers, WC2E Russell Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Russell Street, WC2E Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Russell Street, WC2E Russell Street is a road in the WC2E postcode area
Seven Dials, WC2H Seven Dials was built on the site of the Cock-and-Pie Fields, named for a nearby inn.
Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.
Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2H Shaftesbury Avenue was named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Shelton Street, WC2E Shelton Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Shelton Street, WC2H Shelton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Sheraton Street, W1D Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Shorts Gardens, WC2H Shorts Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Sicilian Avenue, WC1V Sicilian Avenue is a shopping parade that diagonally runs in between Southampton Row and Bloomsbury Way.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Slingsby Place, WC2E Slingsby Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Soho Place, Soho Place lies within the postcode.
Soho Square, W1D In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London.
Soho Street, W1D Soho Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Sounding Alley, WC2H Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
Southampton Place, WC1A Southampton Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Southampton Row, WC1V Southampton Row is a road in the WC1V postcode area
St Anne’s Court, W1D St Anne’s Court is an alleyway that connects Dean Street and Wardour Street.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Giles Square, WC2H St Giles Square is a modern piazza-style development.
St. Giles Square, WC2H St. Giles Square is a location in London.
Stacey Street, WC2H Stacey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Stedham Place, WC2H Stedham Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stephen Mews, W1T Stephen Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Stephen Street, W1T Stephen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Streatham Street, WC1A Streatham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stukeley Street, WC2B Stukeley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
Tavistock Street, WC2R Tavistock Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market Piazza, WC2E The Market Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market The Piazza, WC2E The Market The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market, WC2E The Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Piazza, WC2E The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Thomas Neal Centre, WC2H Thomas Neal Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tisbury Court, W1D Tisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Tottenham Court Road, W1T Tottenham Court Road is a major road running from the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, north to Euston Road - a distance of about three-quarters of a mile.
Tower Court, WC2H Tower Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tower Street, WC2H Tower Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Townsend House, W1D Residential block
Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Victoria House, WC1B Residential block
Walkers Court, Walkers Court lies within the postcode.
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Mews, W1F Wardour Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Portland Street.
Wardour Street, W1D The part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown.
Wardour Street, W1F Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street.
Wedgwood Mews, W1D Wedgwood Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Wellington Street, WC2E Wellington Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Wellington Terrace, WC2E Wellington Terrace is a street in Paddington.
West Central Street, WC2H West Central Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
West Street, WC2H West Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Wild Street, WC2B Wild Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Willoughby Street, WC1B Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street.
Windmill Street, W1T Windmill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Apartment 58 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ape and Bird This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bar Termini This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Be@One This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blocks Cafe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bloomsbury Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bourne & Hollingsworth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Byron Hamburgers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Carlisle Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circus This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clock House The Coach & Horses is a pub on the corner of Romilly Street and Greek Street.
Club 49 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Comptons Of Soho This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
Dog and Duck The Dog and Duck is on the corner of Frith Street and Bateman Street.
Duke Of Argyll This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fitzroy Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Garlic & Shots This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Golden Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hercules Pillar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hudsons House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jack Horner This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kopapa This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marquis Of Granby This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Molly Moggs Ale & Pie House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Museum Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
My Old Dutch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nellie Dean This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Ambassadors Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Newman Arms The Newman Arms has been a Fitzrovia fixture for centuries.
Nordic Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Philomena’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pillars Of Hercules This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Princess Louise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rising Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Salsa! This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Secrets This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Martin’s Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blue Post This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cambridge Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown & Two Chairmen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The London Cocktail Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The O’ Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Plough This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ship This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sussex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Tottenham This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Toucan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Wheatsheaf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Yard Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Greyhounds This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Troy Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Truckles Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Two Brewers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vinyl Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Hart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


St Giles

St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.

There has been a church at St Giles since Saxon times, located beside a major highway. The hospital of St Giles, recorded c. 1120 as Hospitali Sancti Egidii extra Londonium was founded, together with a monastery and a chapel, by Queen Matilda, wife of Henry I. St Giles (c. 650 – c. 710) was the patron saint of lepers and the hospital was home to a leper colony, the site chosen for its surrounding fields and marshes separating contagion from nearby London.

A village grew up to cater to the brethren and patients. The crossroads which is now St Giles Circus, where Oxford Street, Charing Cross Road, Tottenham Court Road and New Oxford St meet, was the site of a gallows until the fifteenth century. Grape Street, in the heart of the St Giles district, runs beside the site of the hospital’s vineyard.

The monastery was dissolved during the Reformation and a parish church created from the chapel. The hospital continued to care for lepers until the mid sixteenth century, when the disease abated and the hospital instead began to care for indigents. The parish was known as St Giles in the Fields and it is recorded in 1563 as Seynt Gyles in the Field.

The first post-Catholic parish church was built in 1631 and from the mid-seventeenth century church wardens note "a great influx of poor people into this parish".

The 1665 Great Plague started in St Giles and the first victims were buried in the St Giles churchyard. By September 1665, 8000 people were dying a week in London. By the end of the plague year there were 3216 listed plague deaths in St Giles parish, which had fewer than 2000 households. After the Restoration, the area was populated by Huguenot refugees who had fled persecution and established themselves as tradesmen and artisans, particularly in weaving and the silk trade.

The southern area of the parish, around present day Shaftesbury Avenue, was a wasteland named Cock and Pye Fields. Houses were not built there until 1666, after the Great Fire, and not fully developed until 1693, becoming known as Seven Dials. Thomas Neale built much of the area, giving his name to Neal Street and Neal’s Yard. St Giles and Seven Dials became known for their astrologers and alchemists, an association which lasts to this day. The village of St Giles stood on the main road from Holborn to Tyburn, a place of local execution. Convicted criminals were often allowed, in tradition, to stop at St Giles en route to Tyburn for a final drink - a St Giles Bowl - before hanging.

The ancient parish of St Giles in the Fields formed part of the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. The parish of St George Bloomsbury was split off in 1731, but the parishes were combined for civil purposes in 1774 and used for the administration of the Poor Law after the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834.

As London grew in the 18th and 19th centuries, so did the parish’s population, rising to 30 000 by 1831. The Rookery stood between the church and Great Russell Street, and Seven Dials near where Centre Point stands today, now home to the Centrepoint homeless charity. It was of one of the worst slums within Britain, a site of overcrowding and squalor, a semi-derelict warren. From Georgian affluence in the 18th century, the area declined rapidly, as houses were divided up, many families sharing a single room. Irish Catholic immigrants seeking to escape desperate poverty took up residence and the slum was nicknamed ’Little Ireland’ or ’The Holy Land’. The expression "a St Giles cellar" passed into common parlance, describing the worst conditions of poverty. Open sewers often ran through rooms and cesspits were left untended. Residents complained to the Times in 1849 : "We live in muck and filth. We aint got no priviz, no dust bins, no drains, no water-splies, and no drain or suer in the hole place." The rookery was a maze of gin shops, prostitutes’ hovels and secret alleyways that police had little of hope navigating. William Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson and Gustav Dore, among others, have drawn the area, novelists Henry Fielding and Charles Dickens have written about it extensively. Peter Ackroyd writes "The Rookeries embodied the worst living conditions in all of London’s history; this was the lowest point which human beings could reach".

From the 1830s to the 1870s plans were developed to demolish the slum as part of London wide clearances for improved transport routes, sanitation and the expansion of the railways. New Oxford Street was driven through the area to join the areas of Oxford Street and Holborn. The Rookery dwellers were not re-housed by the authorities. 5000 were evicted and many just moved into near by slums, such Devil’s Acre and Church Lane making those more overcrowded still. The unchanging character of the area, failing investment schemes and inability to sell new properties ensured that plans for wholesale clearance were stymied until the end of the century.

Upon the creation of the Metropolitan Board of Works in 1855 the combined parishes became the St Giles District and were transferred to the County of London in 1889.

The local government of London was reorganised in 1900 and St Giles became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn.

The Central London Railway opened Tottenham Court Tube Station, between the Church of St Giles in the Fields and St Giles Circus on 30 July 1900. Tottenham Court Road underwent improvements in the early 1930s to replace lifts with escalators.

In 2009, Transport for London began a major reconstruction of large parts of the station. Much of the St Giles area alongside St Giles High Street was cleared to make way for the new development including Crossrail expansion.

Since 1965. St Giles has been part of the London Borough of Camden.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
TUM image id: 1557403389
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Transmission
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tottenham Court Road (1927)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Royal Opera House, Bow Street frontage, with the statue of Dame Ninette de Valois in the foreground
Credit: Russ London
Licence: CC BY 2.0


London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sectional view of Wyld's Great Globe, which stood in Leicester Square, London 1851–62
Credit: Illustrated London News
Licence: CC BY 2.0


De Hems, 11 Macclesfield Street and the entrance to Horse & Dolphin Yard.
Credit: Colonel Warden
Licence: CC BY 2.0


British Museum station
Credit: London Transport Museum
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Musicians waiting for work on Archer Street.
Credit: Musicians Union
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Cecil Court after heavy rain
Credit: Christian Cross
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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