London Pub

Pub/bar in/near Bloomsbury

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Pub/bar · Bloomsbury · WC1H ·
JUNE
21
2018

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Foundling Hospital The Foundling Hospital in London was founded in 1741 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram.
Russell Square Russell Square station, now on London’s Piccadilly Line, was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906.
The Horse Hospital Built as stabling for the sick horses of cabbies, The Horse Hospital is now a unique Grade II listed arts venue in Bloomsbury.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Place, WC1H Abbey Place was in the centre of Bloomsbury, off what was originally the west side of Little Coram Street and directly behind the Russell Institution on Great Coram Street.
Alfred Mews, WC1E Alfred Mews is situated off Tottenham Court Road, running behind the gardens of North Crescent.
Alfred Place, WC1E Alfred Place was built in 1806 by a Marylebone stonemason called John Waddilove who named it after his son Alfred.
Barbon Close, WC1N Barbon Close lies off Great Ormond Street.
Bedford Place, WC1B Bedford Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Way, WC1H Bedford Way is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Bernard Street, WC1N Bernard Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Bloomsbury Place, WC1B The name of Bloomsbury Place is derived from William Blemund.
Boswell Street, WC1N Boswell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Bristol House, WC1B Residential block
Brunswick Centre, WC1N The Brunswick Centre is a grade II listed residential and shopping centre in Bloomsbury.
Brunswick Shopping Centre, WC1N Brunswick Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Brunswick Square, WC1N Brunswick Square is the result of a sale of land by the Foundling Hospital.
Burton Street, WC1H Burton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Byng Place, WC1E Byng Place is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Capper Street, WC1E Capper Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Cartwright Gardens, WC1H Cartwright Gardens is a crescent-shaped park and street located in Bloomsbury.
Chenies Mews, WC1E Chenies Mews is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Chenies Street, WC1E Chenies Street takes its name from the Buckinghamshire village where since 1556 members of the Russell family have been buried.
Clare Court, WC1H Clare Court is a block on Judd Street
Coach Road, W1T Coach Road is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Colonnade, WC1N Colonnade is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Colville Place, W1T Colville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Compton Place, WC1H Compton Place is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Coram Street, WC1N Coram Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Cosmo Place, WC1B Cosmo Place is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Darwin Walk, WC1E Darwin Walk is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Endsleigh Gardens, WC1H Endsleigh Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Endsleigh Place, WC1H Endsleigh Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Endsleigh Street, WC1H Endsleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Euston Road, NW1 Euston Road runs from Marylebone Road to King's Cross. The road is part of the London Inner Ring Road and forms part of the London congestion charge zone boundary.
Flaxman Terrace, WC1H Flaxman Terrace connects Burton Street with Cartwright Gardens.
Foundling Court, WC1N Foundling Court is sited on Marchmont Street
Gloucester Road, WC1N Gloucester Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Goodge Street, W1T Goodge Street was named after John Goodge a carpenter who along with his two nephews developed Crab Tree Fields to form Goodge Street in 1740.
Gordon Mansions, WC1E Gordon Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Gordon Square, WC1H The completion of Thomas Cubitt’s Gordon Square in 1860 marked the final development of Bloomsbury.
Gordon Street, WC1H Gordon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Gower Court, WC1E Gower Court is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Gower Place, WC1E Gower Place runs from Gordon Street to Gower Street.
Gower Street, WC1E Gower Street is named after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, the wife of John Russell, the 4th Duke of Bedford.
Great Ormond Street, WC1N Great Ormond Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Grenville Street, WC1N Grenville Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Guilford Street, WC1B Guilford Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Guilford Street, WC1N Guilford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Handel Street, WC1N Handel Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Henrietta Mews, WC1N Henrietta Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Herbrand Street, WC1N Herbrand Street is in the east of Bloomsbury, running south from Tavistock Place to Guilford Street.
Hunter Street, WC1N Hunter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Huntley Street, WC1E Huntley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Jenner House, WC1N Residential block
Kenton Street, WC1H Kenton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Keppel Street, WC1E Keppel Street links Store Street and Gower Street in the west to Malet Street in the east.
Kingsgate Est, WC1B A street within the WC1B postcode
Kirkman Place, W1T Kirkman Place is a small turning off Tottenham Court Road.
Lamp Office Court, WC1N Lamp Office Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Leigh Street, WC1H Leigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Little Guildford Street, WC1N Little Guildford Street was the middle part of what is now Herbrand Street, between Great Coram Street and Bernard Street, on the western edge of the Foundling estate.
Malet Place, WC1E Malet Place is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Malet Street, WC1E Sir Edward Malet was married to Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of Francis Russell who owned much of the surrounding area.
Marchmont Street, WC1N Marchmont Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Medway Court, WC1H Medway Court can be found on Leigh Street
Melton Street, NW1 Melton Street is a street in Camden Town.
Montague Place, WC1E Montague Place was developed in the decade after 1800.
Montague Street, WC1B Montague Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Neals Yard, WC1N Neals Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
New North Street, WC1N New North Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
North Crescent, WC1E North Crescent is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Odonnell Court, WC1N Odonnell Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Old Glocester Street, WC1N Old Glocester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Old Gloucester Street, WC1N Old Gloucester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Old Glouster Street, WC1N Old Glouster Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Ormond Close, WC1N Ormond Close is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Peabody Buildings, WC1N Peabody Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Powis Place, WC1N Powis Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Queen Annes Square, WC1N Queen Annes Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Queen Square, WC1N Queen Square was laid out by speculator Nicholas Barbon.
Queen’s Yard, W1T Queen’s Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Regent Square, WC1H Regent Square was laid out from 1822, with houses being built up to circa 1829.
Ridgmount Gardens, WC1E Ridgmount Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Ridgmount Street, WC1E Ridgmount Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Russell Court, WC1B Russell Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Russell Square House, WC1B Residential block
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields.
Sandwich Street, WC1H Sandwich Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Scala Street, W1T Scala Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Sidmouth Street, WC1H Sidmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
South Cloisters, WC1H South Cloisters is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Southampton Row, WC1B Southampton Row is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
St. Georges Road, WC1H A street within the WC1H postcode
Store Street, WC1E Store Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Tavistock House North, WC1H Tavistock House North is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tavistock House South, WC1H Tavistock House South is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tavistock House, WC1H Residential block
Tavistock Place, WC1H Tavistock Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tavistock Place, WC1H Tavistock Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Tavistock Square, WC1H Tavistock Square was built by property developer James Burton and the master builder Thomas Cubitt for Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford.
Taviton Street, WC1H Taviton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Third Floor, WC1E Third Floor is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Thornhaugh Street, WC1B Thornhaugh Street is a street in London
Thornhaugh Street, WC1H Thornhaugh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tiger House, WC1H Tiger House is a block on Burton Street
Torrington Place, WC1E Torrington Place was developed by James Sim in partnership with his two sons.
Torrington Square, WC1H Torrington Square was originally laid out as part of the Bedford Estate development in 1821-25.
Tottenham Court Road, W1T Tottenham Court Road is a major road running from the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, north to Euston Road - a distance of about three-quarters of a mile.
Tybalds Close, WC1N Tybalds Close is a location in London.
Upper Woborn Place, WC1H Upper Woborn Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Wakefield Street, WC1H Wakefield Street is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Wakefield Street, WC1N Wakefield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Westking Place, WC1H Westking Place runs north from Heathcote Street to Sidmouth Street.
Witley Court, WC1H Witley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Woburn Mews, WC1H Woburn Mews ran parallel between Woburn Place and Upper Bedford Place to the west of Woburn Place.
Woburn Place, WC1H Woburn Place is situated on the Bedford estate, running north from the east of Russell Square to the east of Tavistock Square.
Woburn Square, WC1H Woburn Square is just north of the centre of Bloomsbury.
Woburn Walk, WC1H Woburn Walk was also known as Woburn Buildings.
Woolf Mews, WC1H Woolf Mews is a road in the WC1H postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Callaghans This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
County Hotel Ground Floor Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Euston Tap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Gallery Coffee Shop This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George Birkbeck Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hare & Tortoise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lord John Russell P.H. This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marlborough Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marquis Cornwallis This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Museum Inn/Astor Museum This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Bloomsbury Set This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Night and Day Bar Imperial Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Norfolk Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tavistock Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The College Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fitzrovia This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Home Park This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Montague on the Gardens This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Place Theatre Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Queens Larder This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Slice Bar (Cupola House) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Bloomsbury

Bloomsbury is an area of the London Borough of Camden, in central London, between Euston Road and Holborn, developed by the Russell family in the 17th and 18th centuries into a fashionable residential area.

The earliest record of what would become Bloomsbury is the 1086 Domesday Book, which records that the area had vineyards and ’wood for 100 pigs’. But it is not until 1201 that the name Bloomsbury is first noted, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land.

The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. An 1878 publication, Old and New London: Volume 4, mentions the idea that the area was named after a village called Lomesbury which formerly stood where Bloomsbury Square is now, though this piece of folk etymology is now discredited.

At the end of the 14th century Edward III acquired Blemond’s manor, and passed it on to the Carthusian monks of the London Charterhouse, who kept the area mostly rural.

In the 16th century, with the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Henry VIII took the land back into the possession of the Crown, and granted it to Thomas Wriothesley, 1st Earl of Southampton.

In the early 1660s, the Earl of Southampton constructed what eventually became Bloomsbury Square. The area was laid out mainly in the 18th century, largely by landowners such as Wriothesley Russell, 3rd Duke of Bedford, who built Bloomsbury Market, which opened in 1730. The major development of the squares that we see today started in about 1800 when Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford removed Bedford House and developed the land to the north with Russell Square as its centrepiece.

Historically, Bloomsbury is associated with the arts, education, and medicine. The area gives its name to the Bloomsbury Group of artists, the most famous of whom was Virginia Woolf, who met in private homes in the area in the early 1900s, and to the lesser known Bloomsbury Gang of Whigs formed in 1765 by John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford.

The publisher Faber & Faber used to be located in Queen Square, though at the time T. S. Eliot was editor the offices were in Tavistock Square. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded in John Millais’s parents’ house on Gower Street in 1848.

The Bloomsbury Festival was launched in 2006 when local resident Roma Backhouse was commissioned to mark the re-opening of the Brunswick Centre, a residential and shopping area.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
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Cromer Street
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In the neighbourhood...

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The British Library
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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British Museum station
Credit: London Transport Museum
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Cromer Street
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10 Gower Street, Bloomsbury
Credit: Spudgun67
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Cab shelter, Russell Square
Credit: The Underground Map
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Tottenham Court Road, W1T
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Gamages in the late 19th century
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Heals, 196 Tottenham Court Road (1855) This building, which had just been completed then, has long gone. Heals, as a business, remained
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Cow chained to a lamppost, Torrington Square
Credit: FB Group Londonist Urban Oddities/Clive P L Young
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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