Mackennal Street, NW8

Road in/near St John’s Wood, existing between the 1820s and now

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Road · St John’s Wood · NW8 ·
July
23
2021

Mackennal Street received its name since Bertram Mackennal, a sculptor, lived nearby.

Originally it was Frederick Street, unimaginatively named in the 1820s.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
St John’s Wood St John’s Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent’s Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Acacia Place, NW8 Acacia Place is a short cul-de-sac off Acacia Road.
Acacia Road, NW8 Acacia Road dates from the 1830s.
Allitsen Road, NW8 Allitsen Road is a road in St John’s Wood, dating from the 1820s.
Aquila Street, NW8 Aquila Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Avenue Close, NW8 Avenue Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Barrow Hill Road, NW8 Barrow Hill Road marks the location of Barrow Hill.
Bentinck Close, NW8 Bentinck Close is possibly named after Lord George Bentinck (1802-1848), Conservative politician and racehorse owner.
Bridgeman Street, NW8 Bridgeman Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Broxwood Way, NW8 Broxwood Way is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Cavendish Avenue, NW8 Cavendish Avenue was built on land owned by Cavendish family.
Cavendish Close, NW8 Cavendish Close leads off Cavendish Avenue.
Cecil Grove, NW8 Cecil Grove is a location in London.
Charlbert Street, NW8 Charlbert Street was formerly Charles Street.
Charles Lane, NW8 Charles Lane is probably named after Charles Watkins, a property developer who was working locally in the 1820s.
Cicely Davies House, NW8 Cicely Davies House is one of five blocks of flats built for the St Marylebone Housing Association.
Circus Road, NW8 Circus Road reflects the circular shape of the original Eyre Estate building plan.
Cochrane Mews, NW8 Cochrane Mews runs off Circus Road and Cochrane Street.
Cochrane Street, NW8 Cochrane Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Culworth Street, NW8 Culworth Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Eamont Street, NW8 Eamont Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Elm Tree Road, NW8 Elm Tree Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
George Eyre House, NW8 George Eyre House was designed by architect Louis de Soissons.
Greenberry Street, NW8 Greenberry Street has a name which is possibly a corruption of Green Barrow Hill.
Hanover House, NW8 Hanover House is located on St Johns Wood High Street.
Henstridge Place, NW8 Henstridge Place (rather obscurely) refers to a ridge where stallions are kept.
Kingsmill Terrace, NW8 Kingsmill Terrace is named after a member of the Eyre family.
Newcourt Street, NW8 Newcourt Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Ordnance Hill, NW8 Ordnance Hill is so-named because the Board of Ordnance was the original lessee of St John’s Wood Barracks.
Ormonde Terrace, NW8 Ormonde Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Oslo Court, NW8 Oslo Court was built between 1936 and 1938 by architect Robert Atkinson.
O’ Neill House, NW8 O’Neill House is a block along Cochrane Street.
Prince Albert Road, NW8 Originally called Albert Road, it was renamed after the Prince Consort of Queen Victoria in 1938.
Prince Albert Road, NW8 Prince Albert Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Queen’s Terrace, NW8 Queen’s Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Queens Terrace, NW8 Queens Terrace is a location in London.
Rossetti Mews, NW8 Rossetti Mews is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Rudgwick Terrace, NW8 Rudgwick Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Shannon Place, NW8 Shannon Place is a location in London.
St Edmund’s Terrace, NW8 St Edmund’s Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St James’s Close, NW8 St James’s Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St John’s Wood Terrace, NW8 St John’s Wood Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St John’s Wood High Street, NW8 St John’s Wood High Street is a shopping street of St John’s Wood.
St Stephen’s Close, NW8 St Stephen’s Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St. Edmunds Terrace, NW8 St. Edmunds Terrace is a location in London.
St. James’s Terrace, NW8 St. James’s Terrace is a location in London.
Tatham Place, NW8 Tatham Place is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Titchfield Road, NW8 Titchfield Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Townshend Estate, NW8 Townshend Estate is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Townshend Road, NW8 Townshend Road was named after the commander who received the French surrender of Quebec in 1759.
Wellington Place, NW8 Wellington Place, like Wellington Road, is named for the Duke of Wellington who defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo in 1815.
Wellington Road, NW8 Wellington Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Wells Rise, NW8 This is a street in the NW8 postcode area
Woronzow Road, NW8 Woronzow Road was named after Count Woronzow, Russian ambassador from 1785-1806


St John’s Wood

St John’s Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent’s Park.

St John’s Wood was once part of the Great Forest of Middlesex with the name deriving from its mediaeval owners, the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitallers), an Augustinian order. The order took over the land from the Knights Templar in 1323.

After the Reformation and the Dissolution of monastic orders, St John’s Wood became Crown land, and Henry VIII established Royal Hunting Grounds in what became known as Marylebone Park.

Until the end of the eighteenth century, the area was agricultural.

St John’s Wood was developed from the early 19th century onwards. It was one of the first London suburbs to be developed with a large amount of low density ’villa’ housing, as opposed to the terraced housing which was the norm in London up to the 19th century. Parts of St John’s Wood have been rebuilt at a higher density but it remains one of the most expensive areas of London.

St John’s Wood is the location of Lord’s Cricket Ground and for Abbey Road Studios where The Beatles recorded.

The Rolling Stones referenced St John’s Wood in their song Play With Fire. Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones lived on Carlton Hill, at the northern edge of St John’s Wood, in the 1960s.

St John’s Wood station was opened on 20 November 1939 on a new section of deep-level tunnel constructed between Baker Street and Finchley Road when the Metropolitan Line’s services on its Stanmore branch were transferred to the Bakerloo Line. It was transferred along with the rest of the Stanmore branch to the Jubilee Line when it opened in 1979. With the opening of St John’s Wood station, two nearby stations on the Metropolitan Line were closed. These were Lord’s (which had originally been opened in 1868 as St John’s Wood Road) and Marlborough Road.

The station building is located on the corner of Acacia Road and Finchley Road. The station is the nearest one to Lord’s Cricket Ground and Abbey Road Studios. For this reason Beatles memorabilia are sold at the station.

The platform design remains the same as when opened in 1939, and was designed by Harold Stabler.


LOCAL PHOTOS

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
A photographer called Iain Macmillan was a friend of John and Yoko and, during the morning of Friday 8 August 1969 found himself commissioned to take a photo of the Fab Four to adorn their latest studio release, an album called Abbey Road. As the group waited outside the studio for the shoot to begin, Linda McCartney took a number of extra photographs.
Credit: Apple Corps
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The oldest parts of the Barrow Hill Estate in St Johns Wood date from 1937
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence:
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Abbey lodge as it appeared on the 1872 Ordnance Survey map. It faces Park Road with Hanover Gate to its north and Hanover Terrace behind.
Credit: Crown Copyright (expired)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Allitsen Road, NW8 was named after Frances Allitsen, a songwriter. During the Boer War, she composed the then-popular Theres A Land.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Oslo Court in St Johns Wood was built of reinforced concrete. Its basement was used through the war as a shelter for local residents as well as the flat owners. Olga Lehman (1912 2001) was an artist known for her murals and portraits and was permitted by the War Office to make sketches of London bomb damage, air raid shelters and ARP personnel.
Credit: Olga Lehman
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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