Camden Town

Underground station, existing between 1907 and now

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Underground station · * · NW1 ·
JUNE
23
2021

Camden Town tube station is a major junction on the Northern Line and one of the busiest stations on the London Underground network. It is particularly busy at weekends with tourists visiting Camden Market and Camden High Street.

Camden is well-known for Camden Market which is a major tourist attraction, particularly busy at weekends, selling variety of fashion, antiques, lifestyle and bizarre goods; they (and the surrounding shops) are popular with young people, in particular those searching for alternative clothing.

It is an area popular with overseas students who come to Camden to learn English and find a job in one of the local bars or restaurants. The oldest established language school is Camden College of English, which is located at the Chalk Farm side of the market.

The Regent’s Canal runs through the north end of Camden Town and is a popular walk in summer.

Camdem Town tube station began life as part of the original route of the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR) (now part of the Northern Line). As the line here branched into two routes, to Hampstead and to Highgate, the design of the station was rather unusual, shaped like a V. The line to Hampstead (now the Edgware Branch) is under Chalk Farm Road; the line to Highgate (now the High Barnet branch) is under Kentish Town Road. With the narrowness of the roads above, and the necessity to keep directly beneath them to avoid having to pay compensation to landowners during construction, on both lines the northbound platform is directly above the southbound one.

At the apex of the V is a junction allowing northbound trains to take either of the branches north, and likewise allow the trains south from the branches to join the single southbound track. This resulted in four connecting tunnels. When the CCE&HR and City & South London Railway lines were joined together after the City & South London Line became part of London Underground, a short extension from the Euston terminus of the City & South London was built to connect with each of the two northerly branches. This added another four tunnels to the junction, making it the most complex junction on the network.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Camden Road Camden Road is one of the few railway stations in England in which there is a police station.
Camden Town Camden Town tube station is a major junction on the Northern Line and one of the busiest stations on the London Underground network. It is particularly busy at weekends with tourists visiting Camden Market and Camden High Street.
Greek Orthodox Church of All Saints All Saints, Camden Town is a Greek Orthodox church known as the Greek Orthodox Church of All Saints.

THE STREETS OF CAMDEN TOWN
Abingdon Close, NW1 Abingdon Close is a more recent street of Camden.
Albert Street, NW1 Albert Street runs north-south in Camden Town.
Arlington Road, NW1 Arlington Road is misnamed from a noble derivation of Harlington, Middlesex.
Augustus House, NW1 Residential block
Barker Drive, NW1 Barker Drive built over railway sidings, takes its name from Tom Barker (1887-1970) who served as Mayor of Camden in the 1950s.
Barton Place, NW1 Barton Place was a mid-nineteenth century name for a section of Camden High Street.
Bayham Place, NW1 Bayham Place is a short cobbled street.
Bayham Street, NW1 Bayham Street is named for one of Lord’s Camden’s titles, Viscount Bayham.
Baynes Street, NW1 Baynes Street connects Royal College Street with St Pancras Way.
Bergholt Mews, NW1 Bergholt Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Broadfield Lane, NW1 Broadfield Lane is a location in London.
Bruges Place, NW1 Bruges Place is a street in Camden Town.
Buck Street, NW1 Buck Street leads from Kentish Town Road to Camden High Street.
Camden High Street, NW1 Camden High Street is the local high street for Camden Town.
Camden Lock Place, NW1 Camden Lock Place is a street in Camden Town.
Camden Lock, NW1 Camden Lock is a street in Camden Town.
Camden Mews, NW1 Camden Mews is a street in Camden Town.
Camden Park Road, NW1 Camden Park Road is a street in Camden Town.
Camden Street, NW1 Camden Street is a street in Camden Town.
Camden Terrace, NW1 Camden Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Camley Street, N1C Camley Street runs north from King’s Cross.
Camley Street, NW1 Camley Street is a street in Camden Town.
Cantelowes Road, NW1 Cantelowes Road is a street in Camden Town.
Carol Street, NW1 Carol Street is a street in Camden Town.
Castlehaven Road, NW1 Castlehaven Road was united as a street in 1938.
Centric Close, NW1 Centric Close is a street in Camden Town.
Chalk Farm Road, NW1 Chalk Farm Road is a street in Camden Town.
Church Studios, NW1 Church Studios is a street in Camden Town.
Clarence Way, NW1 Clarence Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cliff Road Studios, NW1 Cliff Road Studios is a street in Camden Town.
Cliff Road, NW1 Cliff Road is a street in Camden Town.
Cobham Mews, NW1 Cobham Mews is a street in Camden Town.
College Grove, NW1 College Grove is a road in the NW1 postcode area
College Place, NW1 College Place is a street in Camden Town.
Compton Close, NW1 Compton Close is a street in Camden Town.
Crofters Way, NW1 Crofters Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cumberland Terrace, NW1 Cumberland Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Delancey Passage, NW1 Delancey Passage is a street in Camden Town.
Delancey Street, NW1 Delancey Street is a street in Camden Town.
Early Mews, NW1 Early Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
East Yard, NW1 East Yard is a street in Camden Town.
Elm Friars Walk, NW1 Elm Friars Walk is a street in Camden Town.
Farrier Street, NW1 Farrier Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Forge Place, NW1 Forge Place is a street in Camden Town.
Georgiana Street, NW1 Georgiana Street is a street in Camden Town.
Gilbeys Yard, NW1 Gilbeys Yard is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Gloucester Avenue, NW1 Gloucester Avenue is a street in Camden Town.
Gloucester Crescent, NW1 Gloucester Crescent is a street in Camden Town.
Gloucester Gate Mews, NW1 Gloucester Gate Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Gloucester Gate, NW1 Gloucester Gate is a street in Camden Town.
Granary Street, NW1 Granary Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Granby Terrace, NW1 Granby Terrace was previously called Granby Street.
Greenland Place, NW1 Greenland Place followed the line of Church Path.
Greenland Road, NW1 Greenland Road is a street in Camden Town.
Greenland Street, NW1 Greenland Street was originally York Street.
Hartland Road, NW1 Hartland Road is a street in Camden Town.
Haven Street, NW1 Haven Street is a street in Camden Town.
Hawley Crescent, NW1 Hawley Crescent is a street in Camden Town.
Hawley Road, NW1 Hawley Road is a street in Camden Town.
Hopkinsons Place, NW1 Hopkinsons Place is a street in Camden Town.
Hurdwick Place, NW1 Hurdwick Place is a street in Camden Town.
Inverness Street, NW1 Inverness Street is a street in Camden Town.
Ivor Street, NW1 Ivor Street is a street in Camden Town.
James Cameron House, NW1 Residential block
Jamestown Road, NW1 Jamestown Road is a street in Camden Town.
Jeffrey’s Street, NW1 Jeffrey’s Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Jeffrey’s Place, NW1 Jeffrey’s Place is a dogleg running from Prowse Place to Jeffrey’s Street.
Kentish Town Road, NW1 Kentish Town Road is a street in Camden Town.
Lawfords Wharf, NW1 Lawfords Wharf is a street in Camden Town.
Leybourne Road, NW1 Leybourne Road is a street in Camden Town.
Lydford, NW1 Lydford is a street in Camden Town.
Lyme Street, NW1 Lyme Street is a street in Camden Town.
Lyme Terrace, NW1 Lyme Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Mandela Street, NW1 Mandela Street was named after Nelson Mandela.
Marquis Road, NW1 Marquis Road is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Mary Terrace, NW1 Mary Terrace is a street in Camden Town.
Middle Yard, NW1 Middle Yard is a street in Camden Town.
Millbrook Place, NW1 Millbrook Place is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Street, NW1 Mornington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mornington Terrace, NW1 Mornington Terrace is a street in Camden Town.
Murray Mews, NW1 Murray Mews is a street in Camden Town.
Murray Street, NW1 Murray Street is a street in Camden Town.
North Villas, NW1 North Villas is a street in Camden Town.
Oval Road, NW1 Oval Road is a street in Camden Town.
Park Village Mews, NW1 Park Village Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Park Village West, NW1 Park Village West is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Plender Street, NW1 William Plender, 1st Baron Plender was an accountant and public servant who served as Sheriff of the County of London in 1927.
Ploughmans Close, NW1 Ploughmans Close is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Pratt Mews, NW1 Pratt Mews dates from the 1790s.
Prowse Place, NW1 Prowse Place is a street in Camden Town.
Randolph Street, NW1 Randolph Street is a street in Camden Town.
Reachview Close, NW1 Reachview Close is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Reapers Close, NW1 Reapers Close is a street in Camden Town.
Redhill Street, NW1 Redhill Street is a street in Camden Town.
Regal Lane, NW1 Regal Lane is a street in Camden Town.
Regent’s Park Terrace, NW1 Regent’s Park Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Regent’s Place Plaza, NW1 Regent’s Place Plaza is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Regents Canal towpath, NW1 Regents Canal towpath is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Regents Park, NW1 Regents Park is a street in Camden Town.
Rochester Square, NW1 Rochester Square is a street in Camden Town.
Rossendale Way, NW1 Rossendale Way is a street in Camden Town.
Rousden Street, NW1 Rousden Street is a street in Camden Town.
Royal College Street, NW1 Royal College Street is a street in Camden Town.
Signmakers Yard, NW1 Signmakers Yard is a road in the NW1 postcode area
South Villas, NW1 South Villas is a street in Camden Town.
St Katharines Precinct, NW1 St Katharines Precinct is a street in Camden Town.
St Marks Crescent, NW1 St Marks Crescent is a street in Camden Town.
St Martins Almshouses, NW1 St Martins Almshouses is a street in Camden Town.
St Martins Close, NW1 St Martins Close is a street in Camden Town.
St Pancras Way, NW1 St Pancras Way is a street in Camden Town.
St Paul’s Crescent, NW1 St Paul’s Crescent is a road in the NW1 postcode area
St Paul;s Mews, NW1 St Paul’s Mews runs west from York Way.
St. Augustine’s Road, NW1 St. Augustine’s Road is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Stanley Buildings, NW1 Stanley Buildings is a street in Camden Town.
Stanmore Place, Stanmore Place lies within the postcode.
Stratford Villas, NW1 Stratford Villas is a street in Camden Town.
Stucley Place, NW1 Stucley Place is a street in Camden Town.
Swallowfield, NW1 Swallowfield is a street in Camden Town.
The Law Society Freepost, NW1 The Law Society Free post is a street in Camden Town.
The Marr, NW1 The Marr is a street in Camden Town.
The Stables Market, NW1 The Stables Market is a street in Camden Town.
Torbay Street, NW1 Torbay Street is a street in Camden Town.
Triton Mall, NW1 Triton Mall is a street in Camden Town.
Triton Square Mall, NW1 Triton Square Mall is a street in Camden Town.
Troutbeck, NW1 Troutbeck is a street in Camden Town.
Underhill Street, NW1 Underhill Street is a street in Camden Town.
Water Lane, NW1 Water Lane runs just north of the Grand Union Canal.
Waterside Place, NW1 Waterside Place is a street in Camden Town.
Weavers Way, NW1 Weavers Way is part of the Elm Village estate.
Wilmot Place, NW1 Wilmot Place might have been named after its builder.
Wrotham Road, NW1 Wrotham Road is situated in an area formerly known as Agar Town.

THE PUBS OF CAMDEN TOWN
Alexander the Great This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Belushi’s Camden This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Black Heart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bucks Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Camden Head The Camden Head is one of the oldest pubs in Camden, London, England having been established in 1787.
Devonshire Arms The mock Tudor Devonshire Arms in Camden, also known as The Dev or by its previous name The Hobgoblin, styles itself as "London’s most famous alternative venue".
Fifty Five Lounge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lockside Lounge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mother Red Caps At the main junction of Camden Town is a long-established business, once known as Mother Red Caps or Mother Damnable's, more recently the World's End.
Oxford Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Proud Camden Horse Hospital This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Quinns This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Spread Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blues Kitchen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Dublin Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Electric Ballroom This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Engineer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Golden Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hawley Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ice Wharf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lock Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Stanley This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Monarch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sheephaven Bay This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Stillery This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The World’s End This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The York & Albany P.H This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Undersolo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Camden Town 1920s.
TUM image id: 1557159163
Licence: CC BY 2.0
All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
TUM image id: 1492970567
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Camden High Street
TUM image id: 1547918916
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
TUM image id: 1499354315
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In the neighbourhood...

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Camden Town 1920s.
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The Camden Head on Camden High Street, taken in 1903. The Camden Head is a public house and live venue which first opened towards the end of the 19th century.
Old London postcard
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All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
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Entrance to the Fleet River, c. 1750
Credit: Samuel Scott
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Camden High Street
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Cobden Statue, corner of Eversholt Street and Camden High Street (1905)
Old London postcard
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Mornington Crescent, northwest quadrant (1904). The view includes no.31 where Spencer Gore rented a room between 1909–12.
Credit: Camden Local Studies and Archives Centre
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An STL bus entering Park Street from the High Street (1930). The former Brittania pub is on the extreme right. The pub was later a shop and its ornamental lamps have long disappeared. The bank building, seen between the two buses, belonged to the Westminster Bank, who amalgamated with the National Provincial to become the Natwest.
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Extract from Map of the parish of St Marylebone and parish of St Pancras in London, 1797
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