Verulam Terrace, W9

Road in/near St John’s Wood, existed in the 1860s

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.52885 -0.18025, 51.528 -0.18) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · St John’s Wood · W9 ·
December
13
2020

Verulam Terrace is the former name for a section of the modern Hall Road.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

Reply
Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Reply
The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

Reply
Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

Reply
Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

Reply
Comment
Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

Reply
Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

Reply
Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Maida Vale Maida Vale took its name from a public house named after John Stuart, Count of Maida, which opened on the Edgware Road soon after the Battle of Maida, 1806.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey House, NW8 Abbey House is a block adjacent to Abbey Road studios.
Abercorn Close, NW8 Abercorn Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Abercorn Place, NW8 Abercorn Place is on the Harrow School Estate and is named after James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn, a governor of the school.
Abercorn Walk, NW8 Abercorn Walk is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Aberdeen Place, NW8 Aberdeen Place was built on the site of a farm once owned by John Lyon, who founded Harrow School in 1571.
Alexandra Court, W9 Alexandra Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Alma Square, NW8 Alma Square commemorates the River Alma on whose banks the first Anglo-French victory of the Crimean War was won.
Ashworth Road, W9 Ashworth Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Barbara Brosnan Court, NW8 Barbara Brosnan Court is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Biddulph Mansions, W9 Biddulph Mansions is a corner block on Elgin Avenue.
Biddulph Road, W9 Biddulph Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Browning Close, W9 Browning Close is named after two poets.
Castellain Mansions, W9 Castellain Mansions is a block on Castellain Road.
Castellain Road, W9 Castellain Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Cavendish Avenue, NW8 Cavendish Avenue was built on land owned by Cavendish family.
Cavendish Close, NW8 Cavendish Close leads off Cavendish Avenue.
Circus Road, NW8 Circus Road reflects the circular shape of the original Eyre Estate building plan.
Clarendon Terrace, W9 Clarendon Terrace is a street in Maida Vale.
Clifton Court, NW8 Clifton Court is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Clifton Road, W9 Clifton Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Clive Court, W9 Clive Court is a residential block upon Maida Vale.
Cropthorne Court, W9 Cropthorne Court is a road in the W9 postcode area
Cunningham Place, NW8 Cunningham Place is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Denning Close, NW8 Denning Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Elgin Mews South, W9 Elgin Mews South is a street in Maida Vale.
Elizabeth Close, W9 Elizabeth Close commemorates Elizabeth Barrett Browning, the poet.
Elm Tree Road, NW8 Elm Tree Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Eyre Road, NW8 Eyre Road is a location in London.
Fisherton Street, NW8 Fisherton Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Frampton Street, NW8 Frampton Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Garden Road, NW8 Garden Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Grove End Road, NW8 Grove End Road has a name reflecting the end of Lisson Grove.
Grove Hall Court, NW8 Grove Hall Court is on Hall Road.
Hall Road, NW8 Hall Road is named after the builder William Hall who died in either 1832 or 1833.
Hamilton Close, NW8 Hamilton Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Hamilton Gardens, NW8 Hamilton Gardens is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Hamilton Terrace, NW8 Hamilton Terrace is named after Charles Hamilton who was a Harrow School governor.
Henderson Drive, NW8 Henderson Drive is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Hill Road, NW8 Hill Road runs west from Abbey Road.
Lanark Mews, W9 Lanark Mews is a road in the W9 postcode area
Lanark Place, W9 Lanark Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Lanark Road, W9 Lanark Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Lauderdale Mansions South, W9 Lauderdale Mansions South is a block of 142 apartments in Lauderdale Road, Maida Vale.
Lauderdale Road, W9 Lauderdale Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Maida Vale, W9 Maida Vale is the name of part of the A5 road running through northwest London and ultimately takes its name from a pub.
Melina Place, NW8 Melina Place runs west from Grove End Road.
Neville Court, NW8 Neville Court is a location in London.
Northwick Close, NW8 Northwick Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Northwick Terrace, NW8 Northwick Terrace was named after Lord John Northwick, Harrow School governor.
Nugent Terrace, NW8 Nugent Terrace is named after George Nugent-Greville, Baron Nugent (1789-1850).
Randolph Avenue, W9 Randolph Avenue was first planned in 1827 by John Gutch, surveyor to the Bishop of London.
Randolph Crescent, W9 Randolph Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Regents Court, W9 Regents Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Rodney Court, W9 Rodney Court is a street in Maida Vale.
Sandringham Court, W9 Sandringham Court is a residential block upon Maida Vale.
Scott Ellis Gardens, NW8 Scott Ellis Gardens was built by Thomas Scott-Ellis, 8th Baron Howard de Walden (1880-1946) who was a landowner, writer, Olympic athlete and patron of the arts.
St John’s Wood Road, NW8 St John’s Wood Road is a main road connecting Lord’s with Maida Vale.
Stranraer Place, W9 Stranraer Place was a former name for the eastern section of Sutherland Avenue.
Sutherland Avenue, W9 Sutherland Avenue is one of the main streets of Maida Vale.
Vale Close, W9 Vale Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Violet Hill, NW8 This is a street in the NW8 postcode area
Warrington Crescent, W9 Warrington Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Wellesley Court, W9 Wellesley Court is a street in Maida Vale.


St John’s Wood

St John’s Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent’s Park.

St John’s Wood was once part of the Great Forest of Middlesex with the name deriving from its mediaeval owners, the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitallers), an Augustinian order. The order took over the land from the Knights Templar in 1323.

After the Reformation and the Dissolution of monastic orders, St John’s Wood became Crown land, and Henry VIII established Royal Hunting Grounds in what became known as Marylebone Park.

Until the end of the eighteenth century, the area was agricultural.

St John’s Wood was developed from the early 19th century onwards. It was one of the first London suburbs to be developed with a large amount of low density ’villa’ housing, as opposed to the terraced housing which was the norm in London up to the 19th century. Parts of St John’s Wood have been rebuilt at a higher density but it remains one of the most expensive areas of London.

St John’s Wood is the location of Lord’s Cricket Ground and for Abbey Road Studios where The Beatles recorded.

The Rolling Stones referenced St John’s Wood in their song Play With Fire. Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones lived on Carlton Hill, at the northern edge of St John’s Wood, in the 1960s.

St John’s Wood station was opened on 20 November 1939 on a new section of deep-level tunnel constructed between Baker Street and Finchley Road when the Metropolitan Line’s services on its Stanmore branch were transferred to the Bakerloo Line. It was transferred along with the rest of the Stanmore branch to the Jubilee Line when it opened in 1979. With the opening of St John’s Wood station, two nearby stations on the Metropolitan Line were closed. These were Lord’s (which had originally been opened in 1868 as St John’s Wood Road) and Marlborough Road.

The station building is located on the corner of Acacia Road and Finchley Road. The station is the nearest one to Lord’s Cricket Ground and Abbey Road Studios. For this reason Beatles memorabilia are sold at the station.

The platform design remains the same as when opened in 1939, and was designed by Harold Stabler.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Mortimer Place, NW6
TUM image id: 1492961898
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Sutherland Avenue, W9
TUM image id: 1453139016
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amberley Mews - "The Blue Lamp"
TUM image id: 1545401678
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The 1807 Hyatt map
Credit: British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Dada style Maida Vale block of flats
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Derived from a somewhat famous cover work by Iain Macmillan. Behind the art, the view is Abbey Road, NW8 looking north. The gates of the Abbey Road Studios are behind the white VW Beetle on the left.
Credit: Iain Macmillan
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

This Edwardian view of Marlborough Road station gives a good idea of the general arrangement; the building was directly over the railway cutting. The thoroughfare Marlborough Road was renamed Marlborough Place in the 1930s but the station retained the old name until closure
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Paddington Fire Station (c.1900)
Credit: London Metropolitan Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

St John’s Wood was once on the Bakerloo Line
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Print-friendly version of this page