Kensington Palace

Large house in/near Queen’s Park, existing between 1605 and now

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Large house · * · W8 ·
MAY
6
2019
Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens. It has been a residence of the British Royal Family since the 17th century.

The palace is the official London residence of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, while the Duke and Duchess of Kent reside at Wren House.

Kensington Palace, earlier known as Nottingham House, has its origins in a Jacobean mansion built in 1605. Shortly after William and Mary assumed the throne as joint monarchs in 1689, they began searching for a residence better situated for the comfort of the asthmatic William. In summer 1689, William and Mary bought Kensington Palace from Daniel Finch, 2nd Earl of Nottingham.

George I spent lavishly on new royal apartments from 1718. William Kent painted a staircase and some ceilings. In 1722 he designed the Cupola Room, the principal state room, with feigned coffering in its high coved ceiling; in 1819, the Cupola Room was the site of the christening of Princess Alexandrina Victoria, who had been born at Kensington, in the apartments of the Duke and Duchess of Kent (the actual room being what is now the North Drawing Room).

In 1981, apartments 8 and 9 were combined to create the London residence of the newly married Prince and Princess of Wales, Charles and Diana, and it remained the official residence of Diana, Princess of Wales after her divorce until her death.

Today, the State Rooms are open to the public and managed by the independent charity Historic Royal Palaces; a nonprofit organisation that does not receive public funds. The offices and private accommodation areas of the Palace remain the responsibility of the Royal Household and are maintained by the Royal Household Property Section.

Kensington Palace is also used on an unofficial basis by Prince Harry, as well as his cousin Zara Phillips.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply
Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

Reply
Comment
Matthew Moggridge (matthew.moggridge@gmail.com)   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

Reply
Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

Reply
Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Ashbourne College Ashbourne College is an independent school and sixth form located in Kensington.
Biba Biba was a London fashion store of the 1960s and 1970s, started and primarily run by the Polish-born Barbara Hulanicki with help of her husband Stephen Fitz-Simon.
Derry and Toms Derry & Toms was a London department store.
Kensington Market Kensington Market was a three storey indoor market at 49 Kensington High Street, created in late 1967
Kensington Palace Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens. It has been a residence of the British Royal Family since the 17th century.
Kensington Roof Garden Kensington Roof Garden (formerly known as Derry and Toms Roof Gardens) covers 6000 square metres.
Royal Garden Hotel Royal Garden Hotel is a 5 star hotel in London, England.
St Mary Abbots St Mary Abbots is a church located on Kensington High Street and the corner of Kensington Church Street in London W8.

NEARBY STREETS
Ball Street, W8 Ball Street was created by the Kensington Improvement Scheme of 1868-71, carried out by the Metropolitan Board of Works.
Berkeley Gardens, W8 Berkeley Gardens is a short street which runs between Brunswick Gardens and Kensington Church Street containing terraced houses on both sides with small front gardens.
Brunswick Gardens, W8 Brunswick Gardens runs north from Vicarage Gate - a wide tree-lined road with white stuccoed terraces on either side.
Budge’s Walk, SW7 Budge’s Walk is a road in the SW7 postcode area
Campden Grove, W8 Campden Grove runs between Kensington Church Street and Hornton Street.
Derry Street, W8 Derry Street formerly known as King Street and laid out in the mid-1730s.
Drayson Mews, W8 Drayson Mews is a street in Kensington.
Flower Walk, SW7 Flower Walk is a named pathway within Kensington Gardens.
Gloucester Walk, W8 Gloucester Walk is a road in the W8 postcode area
Gordon Place, W8 Gordon Place is a street in Kensington.
Gregory Place, W8 Gregory Place is a street in Kensington.
Holland Street, W8 Holland Street is a street in Kensington.
Hornton Place, W8 Hornton Place is a street in Kensington.
Hornton Street, W8 Hornton Street is a street in Kensington.
Inverness Gardens, W8 Inverness Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Apartment, W8 Kensington Apartment is a road in the W8 postcode area
Kensington Church Court, W8 Kensington Church Court is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Church Street, W8 Kensington Church Street is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Church Walk, W8 Kensington Church Walk is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Court, W8 Kensington Court is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Gate, W8 Kensington Gate is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Mall, W8 Kensington Mall is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 Kensington Palace Gardens is a street in west central London with some of the most expensive properties in the world.
Lancer Square, W8 Lancer Square is a street in Kensington.
Lucerne Mews, W8 Lucerne Mews is a street in Kensington.
Macmillan House, W8 Residential block
Melon Place, W8 Melon Place is a street in Kensington.
Old Court Place, W8 Old Court Place is a street in Kensington.
Palace Avenue, W8 Palace Avenue is a road in the W8 postcode area
Palace Gardens Mews, W8 Palace Gardens Mews is a street in Kensington.
Palace Gardens Terrace, W8 Palace Gardens Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Palace Green, W8 Palace Green is a street in Kensington.
Palace Place Mansions, W8 Palace Place Mansions is a street in Kensington.
Pitt Street, W8 Pitt Street is a street in Kensington.
Prince Of Wales Terrace, W8 Prince Of Wales Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Rabbit Roe, W8 Rabbit Roe is a street in Kensington.
St Mary Abbots Vicarage, W8 St Mary Abbots Vicarage is a street in Kensington.
The Broad Walk, W8 The Broad Walk is a road in the W8 postcode area
The Broadwalk, W8 The Broadwalk is a road in the W2 postcode area
Vicarage Court, W8 Vicarage Court is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gardens, W8 Vicarage Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gate, W8 Vicarage Gate is a street in Kensington.
York Passage, W8 York Passage is a road in the W8 postcode area
Young Street, W8 Young Street, named after the developer of Kensington Square, was in use as a road by 1685.

NEARBY PUBS
Churchill Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Bones This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Elephant & Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mall Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Goat Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Notting Hill
TUM image id: 1510169244
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
TUM image id: 1556889569
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
TUM image id: 1490459429
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Abingdon Arms Pub, Abingdon Road.
TUM image id: 1489943648
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Bayswater Road
TUM image id: 1552860722
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chilworth Street, W2
TUM image id: 1483806751
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Marloes Road, W8
TUM image id: 1530121229
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
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