Rhodes Farm

Farm in/near Euston, existing until 1844

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(51.52959 -0.13788, 51.529 -0.137) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Farm · * · NW1 ·
November
9
2020
Rhodes Farm was situated on Hampstead Road.

Even before the coming of the railways, London was expanding around the area of Rhodes Farm. Building had jumped over the New Road (now the Euston Road) though this road had been partly designed to limit the growth of London within it.

Nevertheless, Rhodes Farm was 20 acres in extent in the 1830s. The land was on the east of Hampstead Road, near Cardington Street and Somers Town. At that time, the countryside was open from the back of the British Museum to Kentish Town and further north.

In 1835, parliamentary permission was granted to take the London and Birmingham Railway from its proposed terminus in Chalk Farm a little further south. The Chalk Farm plans were abandoned, and the new terminal building was earmarked for a clearing called ’Euston Grove’ a patch of land which belonged to Rhodes Farm.

According to a contemporary painting, the farm survived until 1844.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Ossulston Estate, NW1 The Ossulston Estate is a multi-storey council estate built by the London County Council in Somers Town between 1927 and 1931.
Regent’s Park Estate The Regent’s Park Estate is a large housing estate in the London Borough of Camden.
Rhodes Farm Rhodes Farm was situated on Hampstead Road.
Somers Town Somers Town is a district close to three main line rail termini - Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross.
St James Gardens St James Gardens were used as a burial ground between 1790 and 1853.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Street, NW1 Albany Street runs from Marylebone Road to Gloucester Gate following the east side of Regent’s Park.
Aldenham Street, NW1 Aldenham Street – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, gave land for the endowment of Aldenham School, Hertfordshire.
Ampthill Square, NW1 Ampthill Square is a name which has existed in two different time periods.
Augustus House, NW1 Residential block
Augustus Street, NW1 Augustus Street - after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV).
Barclay Street, NW1 Barclay Street led from Aldenham Street northwards to Medburn Street.
Barnby Street, NW1 Barnby Street is a street in Camden Town.
Bridgeway Street, NW1 Bridgeway Street is a street in Camden Town.
Cambridge Gate Mews, NW1 Cambridge Gate Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cambridge Terrace Mews, NW1 Cambridge Terrace Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cambridge Terrace, NW1 Cambridge Terrace is a crescent off of the Outer Circle.
Cardington Street, NW1 Cardington Street is a rare London street in that it closed for good as late as 2017.
Chalton Street, NW1 Chalton Street was formerly Charlton Street.
Chester Close North, NW1 Chester Close North is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Chester Close South, NW1 Chester Close South is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Chester Court, NW1 Chester Court is a street in Camden Town.
Chester Gate, NW1 Chester Gate is a street in Camden Town.
Chester Terrace, NW1 Chester Terrace is the longest unbroken facade of the neo-classical terraces in Regent's Park.
Church Way, NW1 Church Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Churchway, NW1 Churchway is a street in Camden Town.
Clarence Gardens, NW1 Clarence Gardens is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Clarendon Grove, NW1 Clarendon Grove ran south from Clarendon Square.
Clarkson Row, NW1 Clarkson Row is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cobourg Street, NW1 Cobourg Street is a street in Camden Town.
Cranleigh Street, NW1 Cranleigh Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cumberland Market, NW1 Cumberland Market is a street in Camden Town.
Doric Way, NW1 Doric Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Drummond Crescent, NW1 Drummond Crescent is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Drummond Street, NW1 Drummond Street was the original site of Euston Station.
Endsleigh Gardens, WC1H Endsleigh Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Endsleigh Street, WC1H Endsleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Ernest Street, NW1 Ernest Street appears on the 1860 map as the name for part of Robert Street.
Euston Road, NW1 Euston Road runs from Marylebone Road to King's Cross. The road is part of the London Inner Ring Road and forms part of the London congestion charge zone boundary.
Euston Square, NW1 This is a street in the NW1 postcode area
Euston Street, NW1 Euston Street is a street in Camden Town.
Eversholt Street, NW1 Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town.
Everton Buildings, NW1 Everton Buildings is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Foundry Mews, NW1 Foundry Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
George Mews, NW1 George Mews lies within the NW1 postcode.
Grafton Place, NW1 Grafton Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Granby Terrace, NW1 Granby Terrace was previously called Granby Street.
Hampden Close, NW1 Hampden Close is a street in Camden Town.
Hampstead Road, NW1 Hampstead Road connects the Euston Road with Camden.
Harrington Square, NW1 Harrington Square is named after the Earl of Harrington, one of whose daughters married the seventh Duke of Bedford.
Harrington Street, NW1 Harrington Street leads north from Varndell Street.
Lancing Street, NW1 Lancing Street is a street in Camden Town.
Laxton Place, NW1 Laxton Place is a street in Camden Town.
Lidlington Place, NW1 Lidlington Place is a street in Camden Town.
Little Albany Street, NW1 Little Albany Street is a street in Camden Town.
Longford Street, NW1 Longford Street is a street in Camden Town.
Mayford, NW1 Mayford is a street in Camden Town.
Melton Street, NW1 Melton Street is a street in Camden Town.
Munster Square, NW1 Munster Square is a street in Camden Town.
Nash Street, NW1 Nash Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Netley Street, NW1 Netley Street was formerly called William Street.
North Gower Street, NW1 North Gower Street is a street in Camden Town.
Oakshott Court, NW1 Oakshott Court is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Osnaburgh Street, NW1 Osnaburgh Street is a street in Camden Town.
Phoenix Road, NW1 Phoenix Road is a street in Camden Town.
Polygon Road, NW1 Polygon Road is a street in Camden Town.
Prince Of Wales Passage, NW1 Prince Of Wales Passage is a street in Camden Town.
Prince Regent Mews, NW1 Prince Regent Mews is a street in Camden Town.
Purchese Street, NW1 Purchese Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Redhill Street, NW1 Redhill Street is a street in Camden Town.
Regents Park, NW1 Regents Park is a street in Camden Town.
Robert Street, NW1 Robert Street is a street in Camden Town.
Seymour House, NW1 Residential block
Somers Close, NW1 Somers Close is a road in the NW1 postcode area
St Annes, NW1 St Annes is a street in Camden Town.
St Mary Magdalene Church, NW1 St Mary Magdalene Church is a street in Camden Town.
Stanhope Parade, NW1 Stanhope Parade is a street in Camden Town.
Stanhope Street, NW1 Stanhope Street is a street in Camden Town.
Starcross Street, NW1 Starcross Street is a street in Camden Town.
Stephenson Way, NW1 Stephenson Way is a street in Camden Town.
Taviton Street, WC1H Taviton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
The Polygon, NW1 The Polygon was an earky housing estate, a Georgian building with 15 sides and three storeys that contained 32 houses.
Tolmers Square, NW1 Tolmers Square roughly covers the site of a reservoir of the New River Company.
Varndell Street, NW1 Varndell Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Werrington Street, NW1 Werrington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Whittlebury Street, NW1 Whittlebury Street once laid to the west of Euston station.
William Road, NW1 William Road dates from 1799 or before.
William Street, NW1 William Street appears on the 1860 map west of Hampstead Road.

NEARBY PUBS
Camden People’s Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cavali This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cock Tavern The Cock Tavern is on the corner of Phoenix Road and Chalton Street.
Doric Arch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Eastnor Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Elixir Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Euston Tap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Exmouth Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nelsons Wine Bar Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Arthur This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Queens Head & Artichoke This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Royal George This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Secrets This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shaker and Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Aloysius Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bree Louise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Squares Tavern & Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Victory This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unity Cup This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Euston

London Euston is the southern terminus of the West Coast Main Line - serving Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Glasgow.

Euston was the first inter-city railway station in London. It opened on 20 July 1837 as the terminus of the London and Birmingham Railway.

The site was selected in the early 1830s by George and Robert Stephenson, engineers of the London and Birmingham Railway. The area was then mostly farmland at the edge of the expanding city of London. The station was named after Euston Hall in Suffolk, the ancestral home of the Dukes of Grafton, who were the main landowners in the area.

Objections to the station by local farmers meant that, when the Act authorising construction of the line was passed in 1833, the terminus was relocated to Chalk Farm. However, these objections were overcome, and in 1835 an Act authorising construction of the station at its originally planned site was passed, and construction went ahead.

The original station was built by William Cubitt. It was designed by the classically trained architect Philip Hardwick and initially it had only two platforms, one for departures and one for arrivals. Also designed by Hardwick was a 72 foot-high Doric propylaeum, the largest ever built, erected at the entrance as a portico and which became known as the Euston Arch.

The station grew rapidly over the following years as traffic increased. It was greatly expanded in the 1840s, with the opening in 1849 of the spectacular Great Hall, designed by Hardwick's son Philip Charles Hardwick in classical style.

In the early 1960s it was decided that a larger station was required. Because of the restricted layout of track and tunnels at the northern end, enlargement could be accomplished only by expanding southwards over the area occupied by the Great Hall and the Arch. Amid much public outcry, the station building including the Arch was demolished in 1961-2 and replaced by a new building. Its opening in 1968 followed the electrification of the West Coast Main Line.

A few remnants of the older station remain: two Portland stone entrance lodges and a war memorial. A statue of Robert Stephenson by Carlo Marochetti, previously in the old ticket hall, stands in the forecourt.

On 12 May 1907 the City and South London Railway (C&SLR, now the Bank branch of the Northern Line) opened a station at Euston as the terminus of a new extension from its existing station at Angel.


LOCAL PHOTOS
BT Tower
TUM image id: 1481989234
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Camden Town 1920s.
TUM image id: 1557159163
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Agar Town (1857)
Credit: Percy Lovell
TUM image id: 1499434317
Licence: CC BY 2.0
All Saints, Camden Town, in 1828.
TUM image id: 1492970567
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Camden High Street
TUM image id: 1547918916
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Cobden Statue, corner of Eversholt Street and Camden High Street (1905)
Old London postcard
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10 Gower Street, Bloomsbury
Credit: Spudgun67
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Camden Town, from the Hampstead Road, Marylebone (1780)
Credit: Old and New London: Volume 5 (1878)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Mornington Crescent, northwest quadrant (1904). The view includes no.31 where Spencer Gore rented a room between 1909–12.
Credit: Camden Local Studies and Archives Centre
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The March Of The Guards To Finchley - outside the Adam and Eve Tea Rooms.
Credit: William Hogarth
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The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
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Harrington Street, NW1 about the turn of the twentieth century. This street runs parallel with Hampstead Road, one block west.
Old London postcard
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St. James Gardens
Credit: Google
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